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Perl 5.32 Released With Unicode 13.0 Support, Performance Enhancements

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  • Perl 5.32 Released With Unicode 13.0 Support, Performance Enhancements

    Phoronix: Perl 5.32 Released With Unicode 13.0 Support, Performance Enhancements

    Perl is out this weekend with Perl 5.32 as the latest version of this interpreted programming language...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-5.32-Released

  • #2
    Sweeeeeeet. Still the best 4GL out there ...

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    • #3
      Originally posted by dkasak View Post
      Sweeeeeeet. Still the best 4GL out there ...
      then we shall have to agree to disagree!

      The Perl Is Glue mantra from yesteryear has become unstuck

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      • #4
        Perl was so fun to learn in university last year. Coming from a C and C++ background and being in a scripting class it was a God sent. Perl scripting > bash scripting imo.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by kylew77 View Post
          Perl was so fun to learn in university last year. Coming from a C and C++ background and being in a scripting class it was a God sent. Perl scripting > bash scripting imo.
          Interesting, I didn't think anyone still learnt Perl these days, and that Python was what was taught at universities.
          Yeah, Bash scripting isn't so good, its mainly for smaller things, it's not fast, its not feature rich, and if you use Bash-isms then it doesn't run on other shell interpreters.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by uid313 View Post

            Interesting, I didn't think anyone still learnt Perl these days, and that Python was what was taught at universities.
            Yeah, Bash scripting isn't so good, its mainly for smaller things, it's not fast, its not feature rich, and if you use Bash-isms then it doesn't run on other shell interpreters.
            You can deal with Bash-isms pretty easily. Just declare your shebang as `#!/usr/bin/env bash` and it should work on 100%-1 systems - GNU+Linux, FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD, OSX, Cygwin, MSYS2... the only one that doesn't work I heard is Void Linux, because it keeps env somewhere else.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by uid313 View Post

              Interesting, I didn't think anyone still learnt Perl these days, and that Python was what was taught at universities.
              Absolutely. Python is very prevalent in universities. That is almost why it is a *good* idea to learn Perl today because there will potentially be a skills shortage.

              Especially since some Perl code can get particularly messy it is much more preferable to have a Perl expert in your ranks for any of the truly weird stuff.
              Luckily I am finding recent Perl is being written with simplicity in mind (even though the language itself hasn't really changed much).

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              • #8
                Originally posted by uid313 View Post

                Interesting, I didn't think anyone still learnt Perl these days, and that Python was what was taught at universities.
                Yeah, Bash scripting isn't so good, its mainly for smaller things, it's not fast, its not feature rich, and if you use Bash-isms then it doesn't run on other shell interpreters.
                Not sure about universities, but I learned a couple of basics on Perl in programming class on my college in 2013 or so. And my teacher was about 27 years old IIRC, so not an old dude stuck in his ways or something.
                Last edited by Vistaus; 06-23-2020, 12:02 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by kpedersen View Post
                  Luckily I am finding recent Perl is being written with simplicity in mind (even though the language itself hasn't really changed much).
                  I think it's a shame the language is in decline because conventions seem to have matured and the language evolution that stagnated for so long seems to be picking up speed. Nowadays you're supposed to use "use strict; use warnings;" everywhere, and most new code does. All of our ETL code at work is in Perl, and even though I haven't used the language extensively since the 1990s when I have questions about ETL I can usually find the answer myself without asking him - he just writes nice, clear code.

                  The use of a lot of the obscure special variables is now frowned upon or even officially deprecated in newer releases, and I think that was Perl's biggest wart. Also Perl 5.20 from five years ago added the traditional style of function signatures that other languages support - the old style of:

                  Code:
                  sub foo {
                     my ($a, $b) = $_;
                     ...
                  }
                  still works and isn't hard to learn but feels weird to anyone coming from C/Java/C#/Python/Ruby/JS/Lisp.

                  There is also work just starting to bring a full object-oriented system into the Perl core, instead of forcing the use of a module like Moose or Moo. https://gist.github.com/Ovid/68b3325...51612c7a294ede

                  I also think Perl benefits by the fact that the Perl 6 language was split off and renamed Raku. Both languages can now evolve independently and there will be less confusion. I've been toying with Raku and it's the most fun language I've ever used, but before the rename searches for "Perl6" or "Perl 6" + some feature usually returned Perl 5 results in every single search engine. "Raku" + some feature is starting to work properly now.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

                    Not sure about universities, but I learned a couple of basics on Perl in programming class on my college in 2013 or so. And my teacher was about 27 years old IIRC, so not an old dude stuck is his ways or something.
                    I learnt some Perl back in the 90s reading source code to files published on hackers.com. Experimenting, toying, writing little scripts. It was much nicer, easier and more productive than C. It was a pretty interesting approach to put regular expressions so close to the language. But I used PHP more, then later learnt other languages including Python.
                    I don't have so found memories of Perl, the code could get pretty unreadable with lots of weird sigils prefixed on variables.
                    I liked PHP and Python more, however Perl was still way more pleasant than C.

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