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Android Studio 4.0 Released With Overhauled CPU Profiler, Clangd For C++ Code

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  • Android Studio 4.0 Released With Overhauled CPU Profiler, Clangd For C++ Code

    Phoronix: Android Studio 4.0 Released With Overhauled CPU Profiler, Clangd For C++ Code

    Android Studio 4.0 is out today with this IDE bringing a number of improvements for developing Google Android apps...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...oid-Studio-4.0

  • #2
    They finally improved C++ SFINAE stuff handling in this IDE, however I still don't like Android Studio too much.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by nadro View Post
      They finally improved C++ SFINAE stuff handling in this IDE, however I still don't like Android Studio too much.
      What is it about Android Studio you don't like? Not that you have a choice, but it's based on the IDE I like most: IntelliJ Idea. It seems, to me, that it does its job very well, but I'd be interested in hearing your thoughts.

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      • #4
        I don't like it because it doesn't run on my Raspberry Pi 4. It's supposedly written in Java to be cross-platform, yet, it doesn't work everywhere, so what's the point? On my x86 laptop, it'll run, but being Java based, it runs the CPU fan too much and takes a while to load.

        Qt Creator is miles better. Runs perfectly on my Raspberry Pi, doesn't use up gobs of CPU power.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by bug77 View Post
          What is it about Android Studio you don't like? Not that you have a choice, but it's based on the IDE I like most: IntelliJ Idea. It seems, to me, that it does its job very well, but I'd be interested in hearing your thoughts.
          I see following disadvantages in Android Studio:
          - is slow (setup: Ryzen 1600X, 16GB 3200MHz RAM, Samsung EVO 1TB)
          - there is a problem with refreshing build system for removed/added C++ files to the project
          - "find in files" window is good only in multi monitor setups
          - integration with a gradle plugin (however this point is more related to how a gradle works, than pure AS)
          I still prefer Visual Studio Code and even Xcode than Android Studio. To be honest I never used pure IntelliJ Idea, but I heard a lot of good opinions about this IDE, so I think that Google broken something in Android Studio, probably related to gradle (maybe except "find in files" window, because I think that this window looks the same in IntelliJ Idea). But I see also advantage, it's a much better than Eclipse.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by nadro View Post
            I see following disadvantages in Android Studio:
            - is slow (setup: Ryzen 1600X, 16GB 3200MHz RAM, Samsung EVO 1TB)
            - there is a problem with refreshing build system for removed/added C++ files to the project
            - "find in files" window is good only in multi monitor setups
            - integration with a gradle plugin (however this point is more related to how a gradle works, than pure AS)
            I still prefer Visual Studio Code and even Xcode than Android Studio. To be honest I never used pure IntelliJ Idea, but I heard a lot of good opinions about this IDE, so I think that Google broken something in Android Studio, probably related to gradle (maybe except "find in files" window, because I think that this window looks the same in IntelliJ Idea). But I see also advantage, it's a much better than Eclipse.
            I don't find it slower than Idea working with Java or Kotlin. The emulator on the other hand is murder if you use it on Windows.
            Find in files looks perfectly fine, I'm not sure why you say it requires a multi-monitor setup. Perhaps you don't like it being a floating dialog?
            And as far as the gradle plugin is concerned, that's toughr to get right than, say Maven integration. Where Maven uses a XML file (with an associated XSD), Gradle uses Groovy or Kotlin and they're both way, way more dynamic in nature. It may be because I remember how things were in Android Studio 1.0 beta, but today I can't complain much about Gradle integration.

            Keep in mind Android development is something I do on the side, so my opinions are based on that. If I were to do it 8h/day, I may think differently about Android Studio.

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