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Statsfs: A Proposed Linux File-System For Kernel Statistics

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  • #21
    Originally posted by k1e0x View Post
    It also may break compatibility with other Unix'es.
    So this somehow "breaks" compatibility, but the other 200 or so Linux-specific features don't? How is that, exactly...?

    People who write portable software for "Unixes" target the POSIX API as a baseline and then detect the availability of everything else, with portable fallbacks.

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    • #22
      What was wrong with sysctl? It was deprecated in Linux in exchange of what?

      It's pretty convenient to get both stats from kernel and for altering runtime parameters .

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      • #23
        Originally posted by Britoid View Post

        No one cares about those.
        I am glad that nobody cares about your opinion either

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        • #24
          Originally posted by zxy_thf View Post
          The current "mount" output is horrible for human to read.
          I counted the output on my system and there're already 11 different file systems out there.
          findmnt is your friend.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by Britoid View Post

            No one cares about those.
            Well this is kind of an aside point my main issue is, it just feels like a bad way to do it but as far as compat goes... macOS is Unix, and people do seem to care about that.. being as it has more commercial software than Linux you might say they care more. Making yourself more different than Unix means you may have fewer programs as people will have a harder time porting.

            True they have different display engines but for instance Qt can display on both.. so it could be things like htop, but perhaps someone would like to make a system statistic Qt program. If it roughly collects the information the same way on the backed the UI is more trivial and your software can be used by a larger user base.

            ("Sends other UNIX boxes to /dev/null" Official Apple Ad ~ 2003)
            Last edited by k1e0x; 28 May 2020, 02:10 PM.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by zxy_thf View Post
              The current "mount" output is horrible for human to read.
              If you want to see the mount points of your block devices, use lsblk. Should every single tool give human friendly output, just because some people decide to bang their head against a brick wall instead of using the correct tool for the job?

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              • #27
                Originally posted by aht0 View Post
                What was wrong with sysctl? It was deprecated in Linux in exchange of what?
                Have you ever used anything in /proc/sys/, like e.g. /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches or /proc/sys/vm/laptop_mode? If so, you've already been using the replacement.

                The syscall was error prone and pointless.

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by Larry$ilverstein View Post

                  Have you ever used anything in /proc/sys/, like e.g. /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches or /proc/sys/vm/laptop_mode? If so, you've already been using the replacement.

                  The syscall was error prone and pointless.
                  Yeaaah... I think I like sysctl. Having this stuff on the file system is just dumb.

                  unit=value

                  makes a lot more sense than

                  echo "value" > filesystem/path/unit.

                  I get the argument is done but.. mistakes of the past need not carry forward.
                  Last edited by k1e0x; 28 May 2020, 02:27 PM.

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by k1e0x View Post
                    Having this stuff on the file system is just dumb.

                    unit=value

                    makes a lot more sense than

                    echo "value" > filesystem/path/unit.
                    Why?

                    Originally posted by k1e0x View Post
                    I get the argument is done but.. mistakes of the past need not carry forward.
                    sysctl was removed because /proc/sys was objectively better in every way except number of syscalls required and even that will be improved if the Greg K.H. readfile() syscall gets merged. The performance of reading/writing kernel tunables is irrelevant 99.9% of the time anyway.

                    You can hand wave and parade your JavaScript dev sensibilities as much as you want, but at the end of the day, every single kernel engineer involved took the opposite view to you.
                    Last edited by Larry$ilverstein; 28 May 2020, 05:22 PM.

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by Larry$ilverstein View Post

                      Why?



                      sysctl was removed because sysfs was objectively better in every way except number of syscalls required and even that will be improved if the Greg K.H. readfile() syscall gets merged. The performance of reading/writing kernel tunables is irrelevant 99.9% of the time anyway.

                      You can hand wave and parade your JavaScript dev sensibilities as much as you want, but at the end of the day, every single kernel engineer involved took the opposite view to you.
                      Oh actually I'm a system admin.. you know your end user and customer. One that is complaining because they have to deal with these nonsensical and painful implementations. You should pay attention to your users because they may not recommend Linux platforms if they find it too hard to work with. Kernel engineers aren't the ones actually deploying and living with this mess.

                      sysctl is straight forward, I want to get or set system tuneables. Get/Set is a straight forward metaphor and a very common one. It's used in all kinds of things even old BIOS and web forms resemble it. You toggle the value on a page, you don't browse a file structure and edit it.

                      /proc/sys is like.. wait a min.. so the kernel value.. what parent folder was that in.. why again am I looking in the file system.. ok I'll write that file.. I guess it set? it didn't display any output like sysctl.. better check it with cat. It feels wrong/clumsy to me.
                      Last edited by k1e0x; 28 May 2020, 05:07 PM.

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