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LLVM's Go Front-End Was Finally Dropped From The Official Source Tree

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  • LLVM's Go Front-End Was Finally Dropped From The Official Source Tree

    Phoronix: LLVM's Go Front-End Was Finally Dropped From The Official Source Tree

    Most probably didn't even realize LLVM had a Go language front-end, but this past week it was dropped from the official source mono repository...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...ps-LLGO-Golang

  • #2
    Of course they did.

    If Weboob is offensive, a compiler with a copy of a book with characters aptly named Injun Joe and Nigger Jim is right out

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    • #3
      Good, let Go die already.

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      • #4
        Note that the official (and kinda, maybe, semi active) llvm go port is available at https://go.googlesource.com/gollvm/, the llgo port wasn't really supported by the Go project afaik.

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        • #5
          There's also TinyGo but that seems a little bit different to me. The TinyGo project uses LLVM so that Go code can be used in small places like microcontrollers but I think they've had to make some significant changes that strip out Go functionality to accomplish this. The project did just this month become an official Google sponsored project though which makes me think they're doing something well.

          Originally posted by xnor View Post
          Good, let Go die already.
          Not sure why the hate against a programming language. I'm starting to learn to program right now with a Python course I've purchased and when I finish that I plan on going through the Go programming course I've also purchased.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by xnor View Post
            Good, let Go die already.
            Go is way too mundane to evoke such hate. When people complain about it, it's usually because they're trying to promote some other, more "fun", language where they can better "express themselves" and their managers refuse.

            Originally posted by kenjitamura View Post
            Not sure why the hate against a programming language. I'm starting to learn to program right now with a Python course I've purchased and when I finish that I plan on going through the Go programming course I've also purchased.
            1. You can never really master more than a couple of big programming languages (C++, Java...) so even the thought of having to learn another language genuinely scares the shit out of most programmers.
            2. Your first language tends to define your preferences in syntax and tolerance to different kinds of boilerplate. People coming from C and the modula family never have problems with Go. People coming from Python tend to complain about the lack of generics. People coming from C++ miss their leaky abstractions. And then there's the two LISP guys... Just remember not to form eye contact or show them your back and you should be fine.
            Last edited by c117152; 02-17-2020, 10:20 PM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by c117152 View Post
              2. Your first language tends to define your preferences in syntax and tolerance to different kinds of boilerplate.
              Many adult people who are programmers learned BASIC as their first programming language during their childhood or teenage years in the 80/90-ties of the 20th century.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by atomsymbol View Post

                Many adult people who are programmers learned BASIC as their first programming language during their childhood or teenage years in the 80/90-ties of the 20th century.
                Yeah and that little bit of exposure to BASIC ruined a lot of potential programmers.

                As for GO I’m in the let it die camp. As noted it takes a huge amount of effort to really master a language and in GO’s case I don’t see a lot on offer to justify the effort. At least not for general purpose programming. The average programmer would be better off looking into Python & C++ first and then looking at newer languages like Swift, Rust or something else. I just don’t see the world flocking to GO.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by c117152 View Post
                  2. Your first language tends to define your preferences in syntax and tolerance to different kinds of boilerplate. People coming from C and the modula family never have problems with Go. People coming from Python tend to complain about the lack of generics. People coming from C++ miss their leaky abstractions. And then there's the two LISP guys... Just remember not to form eye contact or show them your back and you should be fine.
                  Well, I'm coming from "limited/not-very-using-templates" C++, on university. Professionally, I'm full Java developer. And, on go I had very missed inheritance with polymorphism, at beginning. However go's interfaces without inheritance with polymorphism, heavily enforce clean code principles, ie. SOLID. And, I still miss generics, as some code is pretty much generic, ie. collection operations.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by wizard69 View Post
                    Yeah and that little bit of exposure to BASIC ruined a lot of potential programmers.
                    Those machines only had 16-128 KiB of RAM, parts of which were allocated to the screen and mapped to ROM containing for example bitmaps of ASCII&other characters.

                    The usual screen size was 32x24 or 40x25 characters, which makes it impossible to have structured code with more than a few indentation levels. BASIC does not require indentation levels (though some later BASIC variants for bigger screens might support preserving whitespace characters in the source code).

                    Originally posted by wizard69 View Post
                    As for GO I’m in the let it die camp. As noted it takes a huge amount of effort to really master a language and in GO’s case I don’t see a lot on offer to justify the effort. At least not for general purpose programming. The average programmer would be better off looking into Python & C++ first and then looking at newer languages like Swift, Rust or something else. I just don’t see the world flocking to GO.
                    As far as modern programming languages are concerned, Go is as good as any other modern mainstream language.

                    Go has minimalistic language specification, so the effort needed to learn it is smaller compared to C++.

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