Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

It's 2020 And GCC Has Finally Converted From SVN To Git

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #21
    Originally posted by CommunityMember View Post

    I presume you have a custom patch set for your self-built Linux kernel to remove each and every patch (and then adjust the remaining code that depends on those patches) from all the companies that you have any objection to?
    Yeah, cause one guy can do that, obviously.... Linux Libre anyone???

    Comment


    • #22
      Originally posted by alcalde View Post

      You do realize it's not 1995 anymore, right? This is like someone saying they don't trust OpenSUSE because of what Kaiser Wilhelm may be up to. Gates is off battling malaria and Ballmer's doing the developers dance with his basketball team.
      True but with a project this large, and fundamental honestly being independent does have some advantages.
      Because now the work-flow can be change to fit the project itself and give some kind of ownership and agency to GNU members. Because GitHub and GitLab simply will not be around forever plus they do go down.

      Comment


      • #23
        Originally posted by alcalde View Post
        What data is Microsoft mining from your open source, public source code, anyway?
        The same that everyone is mining from any place where a lot of people interact

        Comment


        • #24
          Originally posted by birdie View Post
          What is this effing bigotry? What can you mine off an open source project whose entire workflow is public?
          https://blog.novoda.com/github-data-mining-101/

          Comment


          • #25
            Originally posted by Duve View Post

            True but with a project this large, and fundamental honestly being independent does have some advantages.
            Because now the work-flow can be change to fit the project itself and give some kind of ownership and agency to GNU members. Because GitHub and GitLab simply will not be around forever plus they do go down.
            I use GitLab in house hosted on our own server so it will only go down if I make updates or mistakes.
            It will be around as long as people care about it - it's free software (MIT License for the community edition).

            Comment


            • #26
              Originally posted by slalomsk8er View Post

              I use GitLab in house hosted on our own server so it will only go down if I make updates or mistakes.
              It will be around as long as people care about it - it's free software (MIT License for the community edition).
              Same here. My company (work at, not owned by me) is using self-hosted gitlab for our source control, and we'll probably continue to do that for the foreseeable future.

              Our primary product is closed-source software, and giving up control of the servers that software is hosted on is not going to happen.

              For myself, I use github for all of the open-source stuff I work on, but I wouldn't mind spinning up my own personal gitlab instance at home and tying it into a jenkins/travis/whatever instance for mini-projects I work on.

              Comment


              • #27
                Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                Wow, thats insane, you can store information that's available for the the public in a database?
                So, enlighten me:

                - How is that different if you scrap information from Gitlab/Bugzilla?
                - In the context of the thread: What effect has MS as owner on this?
                - What mind-boggling (no-trivial) information can be concluded from the data dump?

                Comment


                • #28
                  Originally posted by discordian View Post
                  Wow, thats insane, you can store information that's available for the the public in a database?
                  I'm not saying it has to make sense for you, I'm saying they will do their best to monetize it. Big Data is still a buzzword.

                  How is that different if you scrap information from Gitlab/Bugzilla?
                  They have better control over the data because they own the infrastructure, extracting info is cheaper.

                  They also have access and power over your account, know your email and phone number (if you have two-factor auth) which is not something Gitlab has over self-hosted instances.

                  In the context of the thread: What effect has MS as owner on this?
                  I'll tell you one thing, Github was never profitable, Microsoft didn't buy them for 7.5B as an act of selfishness towards the masses.

                  What mind-boggling (no-trivial) information can be concluded from the data dump?
                  As usual with most Big Data the issue is more like "what bad decisions they can take by looking at the data, and how that will be bad for you".

                  For example after MS aquisition they started blocking contributors from nations facing US sanctions, because fuck them I guess. https://www.zdnet.com/article/github...ade-sanctions/

                  In other news, there are horribly broken algorithms in other Big Data analysis systems that resulted in a lot of kids ending in no-fly-lists as "alleged terrorists", when even a fucking noob would have figured out to put some kind of age filter on that to avoid this issue. https://noflylistkids.ca/en/home/

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                    I'm not saying it has to make sense for you, I'm saying they will do their best to monetize it. Big Data is still a buzzword.

                    They have better control over the data because they own the infrastructure, extracting info is cheaper.

                    They also have access and power over your account, know your email and phone number (if you have two-factor auth) which is not something Gitlab has over self-hosted instances.


                    I'll tell you one thing, Github was never profitable, Microsoft didn't buy them for 7.5B as an act of selfishness towards the masses.

                    As usual with most Big Data the issue is more like "what bad decisions they can take by looking at the data, and how that will be bad for you".

                    For example after MS aquisition they started blocking contributors from nations facing US sanctions, because fuck them I guess. https://www.zdnet.com/article/github...ade-sanctions/

                    In other news, there are horribly broken algorithms in other Big Data analysis systems that resulted in a lot of kids ending in no-fly-lists as "alleged terrorists", when even a fucking noob would have figured out to put some kind of age filter on that to avoid this issue. https://noflylistkids.ca/en/home/
                    Enough with the stupid conspiracy theories about Github and the Microsoft buyout being somehow tainted because Microsoft can monetize what's already public information anyway. No one that's not wearing an aluminum foil hat cares. Nothing would stop Microsoft from mining the GCC servers already if they so cared. For that matter nothing stops any other "big data" company from doing the same thing.

                    The only legitimate reason not to use Github (outside of simply because they can) at this time from the standpoint of a public core infrastructure project point of view is that Microsoft, like any other corporation and individual IN THE WORLD is subject to the political and legal realities of its home nation. They would need to make sure all the core contributors are not under embargo from the West. This would be true if Github had been purchased by Google, Siemens in Germany, or some deep pocketed altruistic individual in Japan. They would all be subject to the export and international cooperation restrictions of their host country and they change nearly daily. Violate those restrictions in your native country at your own peril.

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      Originally posted by stormcrow View Post

                      Enough with the stupid conspiracy theories about Github and the Microsoft buyout being somehow tainted because Microsoft can monetize what's already public information anyway. No one that's not wearing an aluminum foil hat cares. Nothing would stop Microsoft from mining the GCC servers already if they so cared. For that matter nothing stops any other "big data" company from doing the same thing.

                      The only legitimate reason not to use Github (outside of simply because they can) at this time from the standpoint of a public core infrastructure project point of view is that Microsoft, like any other corporation and individual IN THE WORLD is subject to the political and legal realities of its home nation. They would need to make sure all the core contributors are not under embargo from the West. This would be true if Github had been purchased by Google, Siemens in Germany, or some deep pocketed altruistic individual in Japan. They would all be subject to the export and international cooperation restrictions of their host country and they change nearly daily. Violate those restrictions in your native country at your own peril.
                      Regardless of whether MS has access to publicly available information, now they -own- your publicly available information. Call it paranoid or whatever, but MS is what MS is and history is already done and happened. While it may be true that quantum particles can erase their history, MS can't...
                      Last edited by duby229; 01-13-2020, 07:49 PM.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X