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GCC 10's C++20 "Spaceship Operator" Support Appears To Be In Good Shape

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  • #11
    Originally posted by archsway View Post
    "We've received this comment from NASA about the crash of their latest Space Shuttle launch:"
    Someone is partying like it is 2000

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    • #12
      Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
      I have an idea but I don't want to say it...
      Is it the starshipeleven operator?

      <***********>

      Or how about the X-Wing operator?

      >=<

      Oh snap, the Tie Bomber operator:

      ([email protected]=)

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      • #13
        Next "bofh" becomes a reserved word in languages to implement the "Bastard Operator From Hell"...

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        • #14
          In case anyone is not aware of what the spaceship operator does, here is a blog post that explains it: https://blog.tartanllama.xyz/spaceship-operator.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by archibald View Post

            You let your interns submit code that doesn't compile (on the compilers you support)? You don't make them use the correct software/compilers?
            Correct? Hell no. Much better, we have magical compilers that allow us to inline a certain DSL for parallel processing (almost like you would do with inline assembly).
            The compiler is great but C++11 at most. However we care much more about the compiler functionality than the spaceship operator XD

            If you always pine for the latest "standard"... you will miss out on real innovations. In this way, C++ standards shouldn't go up in numeric order; they should be hashes so people don't get worried about sticking to a specific one (and actually complete their projects).
            Last edited by kpedersen; 06 December 2019, 11:57 AM.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by kpedersen View Post
              Great, I look forward to ripping this one out of the code written by interns so that we can get our projects to compile on compilers we actually use :/
              Yeah.

              There's always one guy who feels compelled to use whatever the latest retarded gimmick added to the language is, regardless of whether it's even appropriate, let alone the "best" way to handle things (for any definition of "best" other than feeding his Dunning-Kruger complex and showing he's got enough time on his hands to actually follow the mess that "modern" C++ is). sigh.

              (And yeah, I confess I've been that guy at times in the past. My apologies to anyone who inherited that code. :P)

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              • #17
                Originally posted by archibald View Post
                In case anyone is not aware of what the spaceship operator does, here is a blog post that explains it: https://blog.tartanllama.xyz/spaceship-operator.
                Sadly that article doesn’t clear up the point of <=> for me. Maybe it is due to trying to read the article on a cell phone but I’m left with the impression that <=> offers little for the programming community. It will be interesting to see what full time C++ programmers think of the feature. Maybe my opinion will change but I would much prefer explicit definitions for each comparison possibility.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by kpedersen View Post

                  Correct? Hell no. Much better, we have magical compilers that allow us to inline a certain DSL for parallel processing (almost like you would do with inline assembly).
                  That is most interesting and all but shouldn’t new programmers be aware of the tools they are required to use?

                  The compiler is great but C++11 at most. However we care much more about the compiler functionality than the spaceship operator XD
                  This has to be a huge negative when it comes to employee retention. Not to mention you seem to take joy in ripping apart a new developers code.

                  to look at it this way, it really doesn’t matter how functional the compiler is if it leaves the new developer feeling like he is stepping backwards with respect to career development. The developer is left with the choice of developing marketable modern skills or working with the archaic. If I was a young man (not the case at all) I’d be wondering if it even made sense to stay around.
                  If you always pine for the latest "standard"... you will miss out on real innovations. In this way, C++ standards shouldn't go up in numeric order; they should be hashes so people don't get worried about sticking to a specific one (and actually complete their projects).
                  that makes no sense at all. Assuming it is done correctly, a compiler suite implementing a specific standard assures you of the tools available. More importantly that collection of compiler and libraries should work properly. A pick and choose solution leave you with only hope that it works properly.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by kpedersen View Post
                    Correct? Hell no. Much better, we have magical compilers that allow us to inline a certain DSL for parallel processing (almost like you would do with inline assembly)..
                    What is that compiler and what does it do, exactly? The way you describe it makes me feel like this entire codebase is relying on a pile of hacks and that within, say, a decade, it will end up among the other unmaintainable C++ projects relying on antique compilers that nobody is willing to work on.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by kpedersen View Post
                      Great, I look forward to ripping this one out of the code written by interns so that we can get our projects to compile on compilers we actually use :/
                      use non-obsolete compilers
                      Originally posted by kpedersen View Post
                      I suppose C is the language aiming at lifespan. C++ is becoming a bit of a random rule soup. Every gimmicky operator like this wrecks havoc with our safety / debug std library.
                      i suppose you have no idea what you are talking about. go learn something instead of making fool of yourself

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