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GCC 11 Aims To Default To C++17 Standard

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  • GCC 11 Aims To Default To C++17 Standard

    Phoronix: GCC 11 Aims To Default To C++17 Standard

    With the C++17 support in the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) already being quite mature for about two releases/years, when the GCC 11 development cycle opens they are looking at enabling their GNU dialect of C++17 to be the default standard when compiling C++ code...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...7-Default-Plan

  • #2
    The unideal situation: Compiler writers tend to implement [much] more quickly newer C++ standards than compiler users adopt this new standards in their code

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    • #3
      Originally posted by onicsis View Post
      The unideal situation: Compiler writers tend to implement [much] more quickly newer C++ standards than compiler users adopt this new standards in their code
      Couldn't those silly users just use C++ standard features before compiler developers implement them? They're pushing the world backwards!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by AsuMagic View Post

        Couldn't those silly users just use C++ standard features before compiler developers implement them? They're pushing the world backwards!
        I propose write programs for C++31 for large projects, so they will use the latest standard when released. Problem solved

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        • #5
          C++17 Support in GCC

          GCC has almost full support for the latest revision of the C++ standard, which was published in 2017. Some library features are missing or incomplete, as described in the library documentation.

          C++17 features are available as part of "mainline" GCC in the trunk of GCC's repository and in GCC 5 and later. To enable C++17 support, add the command-line parameter -std=c++17 to your g++ command line. Or, to enable GNU extensions in addition to C++17 features, add -std=gnu++17.
          GCC5 has been released for some time.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by timofonic View Post

            I propose write programs for C++31 for large projects, so they will use the latest standard when released. Problem solved
            Good luck with your Crystal Ball
            .

            From C++ "criticism" and shortcomings was born Rust , C++1y, C++1z and upcoming C++2a trying to reverse nefarious situation. But does not cram (or care) to push things forward but lag behind. Still adding useless features who nobody wanted, APIs, "wonderful" 3D visual "things" and so on, just to eat more and more disk space, RAM, CPU, I/O.
            So ... Keep on going and "Under the hood", a total mess.

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            • #7
              C++11 is probably one of the best things that could happen to the language, and C++20 is going to be immense and very expressive and powerful. As for the codebases around - no one can (or should) force you to use a language feature. But having access to standard threads, smart pointers, auto, range based loops, filesystem library ... and not use it... then you might be a special snowflake

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              • #8
                Originally posted by onicsis View Post
                Good luck with your Crystal Ball
                .

                From C++ "criticism" and shortcomings was born Rust , C++1y, C++1z and upcoming C++2a trying to reverse nefarious situation. But does not cram (or care) to push things forward but lag behind. Still adding useless features who nobody wanted, APIs, "wonderful" 3D visual "things" and so on, just to eat more and more disk space, RAM, CPU, I/O.
                So ... Keep on going and "Under the hood", a total mess.
                Can you please enumerate the useless features, APIs and 3D things (what the fuck?) you are thinking about?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by clavko View Post
                  C++11 is probably one of the best things that could happen to the language, and C++20 is going to be immense and very expressive and powerful. As for the codebases around - no one can (or should) force you to use a language feature. But having access to standard threads, smart pointers, auto, range based loops, filesystem library ... and not use it... then you might be a special snowflake
                  Or your project has special requirements. One may be very high portability, like ScummVM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by onicsis View Post
                    GCC5 has been released for some time.
                    it supported only some new features

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