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PostgreSQL 12 Performance With AMD EPYC 7742 vs. Intel Xeon Platinum 8280 Benchmarks

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  • PostgreSQL 12 Performance With AMD EPYC 7742 vs. Intel Xeon Platinum 8280 Benchmarks

    Phoronix: PostgreSQL 12 Performance With AMD EPYC 7742 vs. Intel Xeon Platinum 8280 Benchmarks

    One of the areas of performance I had been meaning to look more at following the recent AMD EPYC 7002 series launch was for database servers. With the original EPYC 7000 series performance, the performance came up short in competing with Intel Xeon CPUs, but for the EPYC Rome processors it ends up being a very different story. Given the launch last week of PostgreSQL 12, I've been trying out this new database server release on both EPYC and Xeon processors.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=28350

  • blacknova
    replied
    +1 On SxS testing with earlier PostgreSQL versions latest 10.x, 11.x and 12.x would be nice to see.

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  • Spam
    replied
    Originally posted by onicsis View Post
    A future comparation with the latest mysql 8 will be interesting.
    I guess MariaDB is the most common these days...

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  • jrdoane
    replied
    Originally posted by andrei_me View Post
    Or a comparison with Postgres 11 so we can compare the versions
    This. Theoretically there were several improvements to things like b-tree index sizes along with various performance improvements. Seeing the same hardware tested with both PG 11 and 12 could be enlightening beyond telling us what we already know; that AMD's new EPYC CPUs are killing it.

    Also, when the planner thinks that the target data is sufficiently large, PG defaults will throw another core at a query if it thinks that it will help. Even with a table that's only 100k rows big, something like an ILIKE on a non-indexed column will make Postgres use two cores for that single query on a single connection. So just keep that in mind.

    If you really want single threaded operation inside Postgres with PG 11 or 12, you need to explicitly set max_parallel_workers to 1.
    Last edited by jrdoane; 10-07-2019, 12:44 PM.

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  • andrei_me
    replied
    Or a comparison with Postgres 11 so we can compare the versions

    Leave a comment:


  • onicsis
    replied
    A future comparation with the latest mysql 8 will be interesting.

    Leave a comment:

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