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KDE's Kate Text Editor Plans Improvements To Better Compete With Atom

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  • KDE's Kate Text Editor Plans Improvements To Better Compete With Atom

    Phoronix: KDE's Kate Text Editor Plans Improvements To Better Compete With Atom

    During this week's KDE Akademy 2019 conference there was some planning discussions around improving the Kate text editor...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-2019-Planning

  • clavko
    replied
    Large files are common enough that at some point you're going to want to peek into them. Saying that you don't need the option to open large files is like Jobs' "You're holding it wrong." Extrapolating someone's smarts from their preferred workflow is a flawed proposition.

    Now, that doesn't mean that any particular editor project needs to enable and test this feature. It just means that me and some other people will pursue alternatives which work fine with large files as well. But that's the beauty of the foss systems - you're free to choose.

    Leave a comment:


  • kayosiii
    replied
    Originally posted by dnebdal View Post

    Oh get over yourself. Multi-GB text files are a common enough feature of scientific work - I work at a cancer genetics lab, and stupid-huge csv files are entirely routine. Of course, opening them in a GUI editor is less common (I'd typically use R), but it's not exactly exotic either.
    Generally if this is happening and you need to routinely editing these files then you might have problems with your overall workflow. At these sizes there a some pretty big downsides to using a text based encoding over binary encoding and not that many upsides. It can be sometimes useful to run regexp tools or for diagnosing problems when you are developing software but in your case I don't see anything that you can do with CSV files that can't be done better in a spreadsheet.

    I used to end up large text files doing photogrammetry so sometimes they do happen.



    Leave a comment:


  • tildearrow
    replied
    Originally posted by msotirov
    Not so sure Atom or any other Electron-based editor should be the benchmark they use... Sublime Text is still one of the best non-IDE editors out there.
    It's proprietary...

    Leave a comment:


  • dnebdal
    replied
    I'd love to hear your alternatives. Keep in mind the huge existing ecosystem.

    Leave a comment:


  • cl333r
    replied
    Originally posted by dnebdal View Post

    "I work with the standard exchange format for data in my field" isn't a problem.
    "My text editor can't handle huge files even though other editors on the same hardware manage fine" could arguably be a problem, and solving it means fixing kate to scale better on huge files. I don't see how that would be an "anti-feature".
    It's stupid to work with GB text files, if you don't see this problem then you deserve it.

    Leave a comment:


  • dnebdal
    replied
    Originally posted by cl333r View Post

    I hope Kate doesn't add this anti-feature, people with problems need to solve them not avoid them.
    "I work with the standard exchange format for data in my field" isn't a problem.
    "My text editor can't handle huge files even though other editors on the same hardware manage fine" could arguably be a problem, and solving it means fixing kate to scale better on huge files. I don't see how that would be an "anti-feature".

    Leave a comment:


  • skeevy420
    replied
    Originally posted by ssokolow View Post

    Technically, your first KDE4 experience was also Plasma. They just stopped calling the session KDE with KDE 5 as part of their efforts to rearchitect and re-market the components as less of a monolithic "all or none" whole.
    It might have been, I really don't remember much more than Dolphin, the default taskbar and menu, and the control panel from then.

    In retrospect, the reasons I didn't care for it back then was simply being a new Linux user and it was a lot of new information to take in (both Linux and KDE) so I found it to be a bit difficult to use combined with a lot of stuff starting with the letter K which made (and still makes) names hard to read due to dyslexia issues. The K stuff isn't as bad these days, and I don't know if this is Plasma being laid out cleanly or me having more general Linux knowledge, it just seems a lot more easier to use these days than what I vaguely remember.

    Leave a comment:


  • cl333r
    replied
    Originally posted by dnebdal View Post

    Oh get over yourself. Multi-GB text files are a common enough feature of scientific work - I work at a cancer genetics lab, and stupid-huge csv files are entirely routine. Of course, opening them in a GUI editor is less common (I'd typically use R), but it's not exactly exotic either.
    I hope Kate doesn't add this anti-feature, people with problems need to solve them not avoid them.

    Leave a comment:


  • ssokolow
    replied
    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
    I was really leery because my first KDE experience was KDE4 and I just did not like it at all. Plasma, OTOH, just clicked with me and I've been a Plasma user ever since. Thanks, Kate.
    Technically, your first KDE4 experience was also Plasma. They just stopped calling the session KDE with KDE 5 as part of their efforts to rearchitect and re-market the components as less of a monolithic "all or none" whole.

    Leave a comment:

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