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Visual Studio Code Has Surprisingly Huge Linux Use & Other Developer Metrics

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  • #71
    Originally posted by DebianXFCE Jr View Post
    I will have to quote Ken Thompson here: "It does a lot of things half well and it's just a garbage heap of ideas that are mutually exclusive."
    what makes you think he loves unity or c# more?
    he also said "The three of us got together and decided that we hated C++, it’s too complex. Going back…if we’d thought of it, we’d have done an object-oriented version of C. But we were not evangelists of object orientation", so how is relevant opinion on c++ by someone who doesn't know that c++ is not object-oriented language?
    don't forget, we are talking about guy, who designed "c++ killer", which only attracts python devs. "featureles because it makes it better", but adding generics because users don't give a fuck what idiotic world view designer had. btw, that idiotic world view can be shortened to "only features which i like are important, your are not"
    Originally posted by DebianXFCE Jr View Post
    software used by expert furniture craftsmen? Be serious. Languages, editors or IDEs are just tools, and you pick the one that makes the job done.
    sticks and stones also make job done, somehow people prefer more advanced tools
    Last edited by pal666; 09-07-2019, 05:21 AM.

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    • #72
      Originally posted by pal666 View Post
      if your ide doesn't come with your distro you should switch either ide or distro
      I don't quite agree with this. I find it a bit too time consuming moving tooling around. For example, if you suddenly get a contract to develop an Android app would you then have to use Android Studio? How would you integrate all these different IDE build systems with your i.e Jenkins build server.

      Thats why a lighter editor is generally a good solution if you develop in multiple disciplines or languages. For me that is nvi on *nix or notepad++ on win32. Over the years I have developed simple plugins / patches for these to i.e navigate large projects effectively.

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      • #73
        Originally posted by kpedersen View Post
        For example, if you suddenly get a contract to develop an Android app would you then have to use Android Studio?
        i don't know. if it is required, you have no choice. if it isn't required, i'll try to use my ide which comes with my distro

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        • #74
          Originally posted by pal666 View Post
          i don't know. if it is required, you have no choice. if it isn't required, i'll try to use my ide which comes with my distro
          The IDE that comes with your distro will probably not support Android development. However a simple text editor and command line compiler will always support any toolchain.
          And that is basically why VSCode is often more useful than Visual Studio (IDE). VSCode fits the "simple text editor" niche rather than always jumping around these different IDEs.
          (though again, there are IMO better simple text editors than VSCode, VSCode is branded and marketed (it is on pretty much every stack overflow advert) so that is a big reason why developers use it).

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          • #75
            Originally posted by kpedersen View Post
            The IDE that comes with your distro will probably not support Android development. However a simple text editor and command line compiler will always support any toolchain.
            first, ide also contains text editor. second, my ide is extensible to any toolchain

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            • #76
              Originally posted by pal666 View Post
              first, ide also contains text editor
              It would be absurd if it didn't XD

              Originally posted by pal666 View Post
              second, my ide is extensible to any toolchain
              No it isn't.

              Emscripten?
              TCC?
              SGDK? (GCC based Megadrive cross compiler with a few additional steps)
              Watcom?
              Borland?
              Qt 1.x MOC?

              I have used each of these in my time and I can guarantee that no IDE can support them all out of the box (or with existing plugins).
              nvi, vim and makefiles work with all of them

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              • #77
                DebianXFCE has had an offspring?!

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                • #78
                  Originally posted by Kushan View Post
                  I'm genuinely surprised at the number of people in this thread absolutely baulking at the very idea of using an open-source, free tool instead of a proprietary, closed-source and paid for alternative. Yet having the audacity to blast Microsoft for their shady business practices 20 years ago.

                  The mind boggles.

                  VS Code is a great, general purpose code editor. Its not got all the bells and whistles of a fully-fledged IDE, but it isn't really supposed to. In spite of what some might say, it is lightweight for what it does. It's never going to beat the performance of vim or nano, but again that's not its purpose. I use it all the time, it's great to just look at and edit code. If I want to debug that code, I'll use a different tool. If I want to quickly edit a small text file, I'll use a different tool.

                  There's something between an ultra-lightweight text editor and a fully-fledged IDE and that something is VS Code.
                  Me too
                  The fact that VS code tops the list isn't surprising at all, when it already did the same on StackOverflow for 2 consecutive years, and I believe will continue doing that for many coming years. But seeing so many people ranting about it here is just unthinkable

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                  • #79
                    Originally posted by kpedersen View Post

                    Yes. Based on my experiences with C# in the past with its poor collection of bindings, weak platform debugging support and limited selection of build tools, I will not be using C# again.
                    based on my experiences with C# I must say that it's far easier and safer to use, with careful design compared to old C++ standards or the shitty Java

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                    • #80
                      Originally posted by pal666 View Post
                      you don't have to open all project files, open only ones you need as with any text editor
                      without opening the whole project how can project navigation and code suggestion work? It'll be limited to the files you open.
                      Intellisense and the like are one of the best time savers in an IDE, otherwise everyone would just use a simple editor

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