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One Of AMD's Leading LLVM Compiler Experts Jumped Ship To Unity

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  • One Of AMD's Leading LLVM Compiler Experts Jumped Ship To Unity

    Phoronix: One Of AMD's Leading LLVM Compiler Experts Jumped Ship To Unity

    AMD has lost one of their leading LLVM compiler developers as well as serving as a Vulkan/SPIR-V expert with being involved in those Khronos specifications...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...l-LLVM-No-More

  • #2
    Is it me or do others think that C# is a dead end? I certainly don’t hear much about it in the forums I read. I don’t see a lot of demand either for programmers.

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    • #3
      Article title should specify if it's about the DE or the game engine. Even the article itself only mentions a company name, which people may or may not know about. As far as we know Unity Technologies may be the maintainer of the Unity desktop.

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      • #4
        Internal politics will always be a problem at big companies. However:

        Some of the internal systems feel about that old too. Doing expenses is a pain - the system is archaic and frustrating, getting new hardware wasn’t always as easy as it could be.
        The other thing I really wish I had asked about before I start was how code is actually written. Perforce was the main version control system I used while at AMD, and I find perforce to be an unmitigated disaster for software development. I genuinely think I was at about 10% of my peak productivity.
        This is really worrying. Fixing internal systems is not easy, but it's doable and can greatly affect the productivity of the employees. bridgman agd5f et al you should take some action.

        Using 'Perforce' in a world where 'git' exists makes no sense. I've also worked at a big-name company where the source control was tightly integrated with other systems and the high brass didn't get 'git' and so didn't want to change. It took some skunkworks but in the end the company moved to git.
        Last edited by amehaye; 06-23-2019, 02:33 AM.

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        • #5
          The first thought I had, after reading the title:

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          • #6
            The LLVM compiler backend is still the weakest part of both radv and amdvlk. It's compile times are multiple times higher while generating worse code than the proprietary compiler, so i hope this departure will not affect improvements to it all too severely.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by amehaye View Post
              Internal politics will always be a problem at big companies. However:





              This is really worrying. Fixing internal systems is not easy, but it's doable and can greatly affect the productivity of the employees. bridgman agd5f et al you should take some action.

              Using 'Perforce' in a world where 'git' exists makes no sense. I've also worked at a big-name company where the source control was tightly integrated with other systems and the high brass didn't get 'git' and so didn't want to change. It took some skunkworks but in the end the company moved to git.
              git is not the be all end all of source control, this guy hates perforce, the next might love it. No company should change such a vital piece of infrastructure based on what a single guy thinks, now if this is the common feeling inside AMD then by all means they should change but not due to a single guy.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by amehaye View Post
                This is really worrying. Fixing internal systems is not easy, but it's doable and can greatly affect the productivity of the employees. bridgman agd5f et al you should take some action.

                Using 'Perforce' in a world where 'git' exists makes no sense. I've also worked at a big-name company where the source control was tightly integrated with other systems and the high brass didn't get 'git' and so didn't want to change. It took some skunkworks but in the end the company moved to git.
                The open source teams have always used git, and the developers that used to work on the closed source drivers have also used git since we started the amdgpu initiative. The closed source component teams still mostly use Perforce, however, although some of them are moving over to git as well.

                For what it's worth I don't think the problem is Perforce itself as much as the rules and restrictions that accumulated around it over the years. It probably wouldn't be hard to make git just as unpleasant to use... and I'm sure someone somewhere is working on just that
                Last edited by bridgman; 06-23-2019, 05:24 AM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by wizard69 View Post
                  Is it me or do others think that C# is a dead end? I certainly don’t hear much about it in the forums I read. I don’t see a lot of demand either for programmers.
                  Well, it is used by Unity. So there is that.

                  But there seems to be a recurring pattern. A new dynamic language appears. People love it for being easy(er) to use. This ease of use comes with a performance cost though. Over time a lot of resources are spent to work around these costs. At some point it is abandoned for an existing static language that gets the job done without performance penalties, or the next shiny thing.

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                  • #10
                    AFAIK, Perforce has benefits when it comes to storing binary files.

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