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Oracle Is Aiming To Contribute An eBPF Backend To The GCC 10 Compiler

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  • Oracle Is Aiming To Contribute An eBPF Backend To The GCC 10 Compiler

    Phoronix: Oracle Is Aiming To Contribute An eBPF Backend To The GCC 10 Compiler

    While Oracle has control of DTrace following their acquisition of Sun Microsystems, it turns out Oracle developers are quite interested in adding eBPF support to the GNU toolchain with GCC support as an alternative to the LLVM-focused path currently relied upon for targeting this in-kernel Linux virtual machine...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-Backend-Plans

  • #2
    Oh no..., why Oracle? They produce the most bloated code/apps ever. Hope GCC doesn't get significantly slower due to this.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by xception View Post
      Oh no..., why Oracle? They produce the most bloated code/apps ever. Hope GCC doesn't get significantly slower due to this.
      As said in the article, this is a module used to compile eBPF bytecode using the GCC. It's relatively independent. Besides it's also opensource.

      That said, "company that has one of the world largest VM language aka Java is pursuing another, promising and inherently safe VM language provided by the linux kernel API directly" should not really surprise anyone.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
        That said, "company that has one of the world largest VM language aka Java is pursuing another, promising and inherently safe VM language provided by the linux kernel API directly" should not really surprise anyone.
        It's not as much a surprize as it is worry about my favorite compiler.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by xception View Post

          It's not as much a surprize as it is worry about my favorite compiler.
          As I said, the GCC like most compilers uses different backends, modules, depending on what is the target language. Oracle is working at one of such modules.

          Even if Oracle does a bad job, it will only mean that this eBPF module is bloated garbage. Compiling for any other language won't use the module for eBPF.

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          • #6
            starshipeleven great, thanks for the explanation

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            • #7
              Originally posted by xception View Post

              It's not as much a surprize as it is worry about my favorite compiler.
              Ma', look! It's a neckbeard!

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              • #8
                We could avoid syscalls right when using eBPF ? I wonder if languages like Golang can be become even faster with eBPF backends.

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