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Firefox 68 Integrates BigInt Support

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  • Vistaus
    replied
    Originally posted by Danielsan View Post

    Why not?
    I'm not going to explain myself again to you. Good day.

    Leave a comment:


  • Danielsan
    replied
    Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

    Yes, and there's nothing wrong with that, but it still differs from my initial point/question.
    Why not? Midori has been adopted as official Xfce4 web browser so all the xfce* incarnations can use it as main browser and live happy!

    Leave a comment:


  • Vistaus
    replied
    Originally posted by Danielsan View Post

    I don't see any issue, Midori still continues to belong to the XFCE project even if not realized directly by the Xfce4 devs...
    Yes, and there's nothing wrong with that, but it still differs from my initial point/question.

    Leave a comment:


  • Danielsan
    replied
    Originally posted by Vistaus View Post
    Except that the Eolie dev is not part of the GNOME Team, just like the Midori devs aren't part oi the Xfce Team. They just use the infrastructure provided by resp. GNOME and Xfce.
    I don't see any issue, Midori still continues to belong to the XFCE project even if not realized directly by the Xfce4 devs...

    Leave a comment:


  • Vistaus
    replied
    Originally posted by Danielsan View Post

    Actually it seems exactly as you stated...
    Except that the Eolie dev is not part of the GNOME Team, just like the Midori devs aren't part oi the Xfce Team. They just use the infrastructure provided by resp. GNOME and Xfce.

    Leave a comment:


  • atomsymbol
    replied
    Originally posted by dremon_nl View Post
    Not in a standard library, but I am pretty sure there are 3rd-party solutions with better performance. There is also unique_ptr for move semantics but I wouldn't use it as it's quite easy to produce undefined behavior with it. Rust, on the other hand, has two reference-counted types: Rc for single-threaded use and Arc for multithreading, ARc being naturally slower due to atomicity. That's the inherent difference between the classical languages which were not designed for concurrent and asynchronous programming and the language which was built for that from ground up.
    I think the difference between C++ pointers and Rust pointers is smaller than this. C++ has (sort-of) two pointer types as well: T* and shared_ptr<T>.
    • T* (or T&) can be used in single-threaded scenarios as long as the top-level function caller refers to the object via a single shared_ptr<T> to prevent its deallocation and as long as the object does not escape to the heap or elsewhere. If it escapes to heap or to upper scope or to another thread (that is: the object outlives the scope in which is has been created), it needs to be encapsulated in a shared_ptr<T>.
    • shared_ptr<T> is suitable in multi-threaded scenarios for passing objects between threads
    Maybe C++ should divide shared_ptr<T> into two types:
    • shared_ptr_st: for use in single-threaded code
    • shared_ptr_mt: for use in multi-threaded code
    • shared_ptr_mt cannot be directly assigned nor converted to-or-from shared_ptr_st, which should help the programmer to reason about concurrency
    • The C++ compiler is unable to enforce the rule that everything reachable through a shared_ptr_mt must be shared_ptr_mt as well (struct fields), so it is up to the programmer to ensure this rule holds

    Leave a comment:


  • Danielsan
    replied
    Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

    Yeah, and Eolie is a web browser by the GNOME Team just because it's hosted on their GitLab...
    Actually it seems exactly as you stated...

    Leave a comment:


  • Vistaus
    replied
    Originally posted by Danielsan View Post

    Actually they did, Midori is under the Xfce4 umbrella...

    https://goodies.xfce.org/projects/applications/midori
    Yeah, and Eolie is a web browser by the GNOME Team just because it's hosted on their GitLab...

    Leave a comment:


  • Danielsan
    replied
    Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

    Why doesn't the Xfce team create a browser?
    Actually they did, Midori is under the Xfce4 umbrella...

    https://goodies.xfce.org/projects/applications/midori

    Leave a comment:


  • moltonel
    replied
    Originally posted by Steffo View Post
    Only a small part of Firefox is written in Rust. They wouldn't exchanged parts of it, if it wouldn't gain on performance. You should do your recherche, before you post...
    Argued about that here so many times before, it falls on death ears, some people just took a dislike to rust and can't process some basic observations:
    • Rust is just as fast as C/C++ at the language level. The differences are minimal, there are benchmark wins on both sides, usually not much bigger than background noise.
    • Rust makes complicated code much easyer. Firefox tried and failed multiple times to parallelize their render and css using C++, but succeeded with Rust. Often, naive/idiomatic rust code will be much closer to theoretical max performance than naive/idiomatic C++ code.
    • Firefox is still overall slower than Chrome mainly due to javascript performance, which is still written in C++. Page layout and css parsing, which Firefox has rewritten in Rust, are faster in Firefox.

    Leave a comment:

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