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Rust 1.35 Released With Support For Empty Debug Macro, ~4x Faster ASCII Case Conversions

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  • Rust 1.35 Released With Support For Empty Debug Macro, ~4x Faster ASCII Case Conversions

    Phoronix: Rust 1.35 Released With Support For Empty Debug Macro, ~4x Faster ASCII Case Conversions

    Version 1.35 of the Rust programming language implementation was released today with a variety of different usability and convenience improvements...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-1.35-Released

  • #2
    yeah, upgraded Rust, can't compile Cargo, dammit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3MdTu8dSorY

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    • #3
      Updated today before I started a Firefox Nightly build. On Debian Buster you have to use rustup to install and update, as the repo version of rustc is already out of date.

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      • #4
        that seems rather... boring! good to see Rust settling down

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        • #5
          Just built v1.34.2 yesterday for compiling Firefox 67, so I'll give this version a miss.

          This weekly release cadence is getting a bit ridiculous.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by rene View Post
            yeah, upgraded Rust, can't compile Cargo, dammit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3MdTu8dSorY
            I've found it much more straightforward to simply follow the instructions in BLFS to compile a new version of Rust and Cargo from a stable release tarball into /<something>/opt and point an application's buildscripts to /<something>/opt/rust-<version>/bin and /<something>/opt/rust-<version>/lib64

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
              This weekly release cadence is getting a bit ridiculous.
              It's actually closer to bi-monthly:
              • Version 1.35.0 (2019-05-23)
              • Version 1.34.0 (2019-04-11)
              • Version 1.33.0 (2019-02-28)
              • Version 1.32.0 (2019-01-17)

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              • #8
                Originally posted by clementl View Post

                It's actually closer to bi-monthly:
                • Version 1.35.0 (2019-05-23)
                • Version 1.34.0 (2019-04-11)
                • Version 1.33.0 (2019-02-28)
                • Version 1.32.0 (2019-01-17)
                I don't understand why Firefox needs to use the latest and greatest features of Rust. Can they not wait 6 to 12 months to require the next feature milestone. If rust would compile cleanly in 10 minutes I would say nothing, but bootstrapping Rust & Cargo (if they even build, which often they do not due to strange bootstrapping hiccups) takes over an hour on a halfway decent system. And yes, there are people who want to build from source to know what they get, and be able to potentially work on the source to fix or tweak something, or develop new features (aka research).

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by rene View Post

                  I don't understand why Firefox needs to use the latest and greatest features of Rust. Can they not wait 6 to 12 months to require the next feature milestone. If rust would compile cleanly in 10 minutes I would say nothing, but bootstrapping Rust & Cargo (if they even build, which often they do not due to strange bootstrapping hiccups) takes over an hour on a halfway decent system. And yes, there are people who want to build from source to know what they get, and be able to potentially work on the source to fix or tweak something, or develop new features (aka research).
                  If you're one of those people then I'm sorry to break it to you - you're too nervous for this and lack patience (and I'm even worse btw). Firefox needs the latest and greatest Rust features because .. flash news.. that makes it easier to write Rust code, but the last few Rust releases were lighter on features than usually.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by rene View Post
                    And yes, there are people who want to build from source to know what they get, and be able to potentially work on the source to fix or tweak something, or develop new features (aka research).
                    I guess that's why. For anyone not working on the compiler itself, using Rustup is the norm in the Rust community. Since updating Rustc and Cargo with Rustup is a breeze the development team assumes the most recent stable compiler.
                    Which is actually a pretty conservative stance, a lot of libraries on crates.io require the nightly compiler. Although there's a lot of movement towards the stable compiler in the last few months.

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