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Adiantum Queued Ahead Of Linux 4.21 As Google's Speck Replacement

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  • Adiantum Queued Ahead Of Linux 4.21 As Google's Speck Replacement

    Phoronix: Adiantum Queued Ahead Of Linux 4.21 As Google's Speck Replacement

    Adiantum is the new crypto algorithm Google is backing for disk encryption on low-end (Android) devices following their change of course regarding the controversial NSA-developed Speck algorithm earlier this year...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...o-Linux-Coming

  • #2
    A symmetric(?) crypto algorithm from Google without official NSA-support? Wow. That makes me _really_ confident.

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    • #3
      I think using new cypher algorithms that have been designed especially for low-power systems is a dangerous mistake. Even if the cipher itself doesn't get cracked, this sort of thing shortens the time necessary to brute-force a passphrase. Political dissidents and people facing government repression need strong encryption more than they need faster, more responsive phones

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      • #4
        This isn't intended to replace proper encryption, it's more intended to be used for things that weren't encrypted yet due to resource constraints.

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        • #5
          Calm down, people, so many uninformed paranoia here. I think I have the duty to clarify.

          Originally posted by milkylainen View Post
          A symmetric(?) crypto algorithm from Google without official NSA-support? Wow. That makes me _really_ confident.
          The Speck algorithm is a new low-security cipher designed by the NSA, hence it gets all this controversy.

          Originally posted by [B
          Luke[/B]]I think using new cypher algorithms that have been designed especially for low-power systems is a dangerous mistake.
          Google finally decides to agree with you, this is exactly why they designed HPolyC/Adiantum. Unlike what the article says, Google's HPolyC/Adiantum are NOT new symmetric __ciphers__, but a full-disk encryption __framework__, based on universally trusted ChaCha20 cipher, and Poly1305 authentication code.

          Traditionally, full-disk encryption was implemented based on a BLOCK CIPHER, such as AES, with XTS mode of operation. But as ChaCha20 is a steam cipher, it cannot be used for disk-encryption despite its reputation on high security and performance.

          After Speck was declared unreliable, what Google did after was designing a construction similar to AES-XTS to allow a stream cipher to be used instead of a block cipher in full-disk encryption, with equivalent security. The HPolyC/Adiantum framework allows we use any stream cipher in full-disk encryption, and in this case, the cipher is ChaCha20.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by milkylainen View Post
            A symmetric(?) crypto algorithm from Google without official NSA-support? Wow. That makes me _really_ confident.
            The Speck algorithm is a new low-security cipher designed by the NSA, hence it gets all this controversy.

            Originally posted by Luke
            I think using new cypher algorithms that have been designed especially for low-power systems is a dangerous mistake.
            This is exactly why Google finally decide to design HPolyC/Adiantum, the purpose is to make existing stream ciphers usable, instead of using new block ciphers. Unlike what the article says, Google's HPolyC/Adiantum are NOT new symmetric __ciphers__, but a full-disk encryption __framework__, based on universally trusted ChaCha20 cipher, and Poly1305 authentication code.

            Traditionally, full-disk encryption was implemented based on a BLOCK CIPHER, such as AES, with XTS mode of operation. But as ChaCha20 is a steam cipher, it cannot be used for disk-encryption despite its reputation on high security and performance.

            After Speck was declared unreliable, what Google did after was designing a construction similar to AES-XTS to allow a stream cipher to be used instead of a block cipher in full-disk encryption, with equivalent security. The HPolyC/Adiantum framework allows we use any stream cipher in full-disk encryption, and in this case, the cipher is ChaCha20.

            Comment


            • #7
              Unapproved, unapproved... Ping Michael for review, plz.

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