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Intel SGX Enclave Support Added To GCC

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  • Intel SGX Enclave Support Added To GCC

    Phoronix: Intel SGX Enclave Support Added To GCC

    The latest feature addition to the GCC compiler this week is support for Intel's new "ENCLV"...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...LV-GCC-Support

  • #2
    No thx. https://github.com/lsds/spectre-attack-sgx

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    • #3
      Could be useful in video games for anti-cheat. You could stop users from using software to read memory to get access to the location of other players (wall hack) and get info on the status of other players (ESP). It would make writing aim bots more difficult too.

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      • #4
        This is terrible. I don't even know why it should be in GCC.

        Oh well, Intel is loosing ground anyway... Hopefully they won't be relevant in 10 years.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by tpruzina
          The main application for SGX this is DRM.
          I can see applications in private & secure communications.

          Couldn't it also be used by software running in a container, in order to protect its contents from the host OS? I guess, if you really don't trust the host, then you can't trust that it''s really implementing SGX, rather than simply claiming it is and providing some trivial emulation of enclv.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by tpruzina

            Yeah, but its hardware specific, hence not worth the time. The main application for SGX this is DRM. Unfortunately, I don't see SGX being used for games anytime soon or ever, except for maybe games like CS:GO adding special tournament-only builds. You need to recompile entire game binary with SGX support for it to work as expected, not just small enclaves of code, like you would for protecting sensitive data in other applications.

            Oh and lets not forget that SGX is disabled by UEFI on vast majority of motherboards (even if few individuals might turn it on, most people never will).
            Cost of implementing and the disabled by default aspects of this do lower the chance someone will implement it (eg Valve).

            I think there is a growing demand for functioning anti-cheat tech in the competitive gaming market. Cheating is becoming a huge problem for players and game devs who lose players due to their frustration with the cheaters. This tech has some promise and the drawbacks stated above aren't huge.

            I can already think of a trivial workaround for the issue of not everyone having a compatible chip. A simple toggle-option could be added to the competitive game's matchmaking system to let the player "only search for games with SGX, anti-cheat, secured players". I've seen similar options to that already in some competitive games.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by coder View Post
              I can see applications in private & secure communications.

              Couldn't it also be used by software running in a container, in order to protect its contents from the host OS? I guess, if you really don't trust the host, then you can't trust that it''s really implementing SGX, rather than simply claiming it is and providing some trivial emulation of enclv.
              This could even be used to create a more heavily isolated kernel. The people who are irrationally flipping out because it has applications to supporting DRM are probably also afraid of LGBT etc. Fear is healthy. Uneducated knee-jerk reaction fear is not.

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              • #8
                Is there a functional equivalent in AMD processors?
                If not, I don't expect it to be widely used.

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