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Purism Highlights Challenges During Coreboot Development

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  • #21
    Originally posted by oskar-n View Post
    åäöÅÄÖ?
    Compose key is your friend. (in opensuse kde that's "right shift+right ctrl") (also note that you push the composed letter one after the other, it's not a key combo, but a key sequence.

    As in "compose", "o", "a" : å,
    "compose", ' " ' "a" : ä
    compose, /, o : ø
    compose, o, e : œ
    compose, a, e : æ
    compose, t, h : þ
    compose, . , i : ı
    compose, =, e : €
    compose, =, Y : ¥
    compose, !, ! : ¡
    compose, . , . : …
    compose, <, < : «

    etc.

    The best thing : This mechanism works regardless of the actual keyboard mapping.
    It only relies on either a physical "compose" key or a keybinding, and then only a sequence of plain ASCII characters present on any keyboard.
    Nearly any caracter used in any latin derivated alphabet can be composed using whatever mapping your current keyboard uses.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by Nille_kungen View Post
      Let my expain it as easy as possible.
      Remove three vowels from your english keyboard and then use for every day typing.

      Now you can remap the keyboard but it changes more then you would think with all special signs.
      If we goes back to the old VIC and Commandore 20, 64, 128 they actually had stickers on the changed keys, i can't remember if the special signs also where remapped back then.
      Thoose stickers didn't wear of.

      Other then that Tomin made an good post.

      Putting keyboard mapping a side i think this picture of an US and UK keybord shows the psysical difference
      Yeah, I am currently typing on the ISO/IEC 9995-2 105-key mechanical layout (as pictured for United Kingdom in your picture), printed for the Canadian multilingual (English-French) layout. I use Dvorak on it, so it has ANSI number/backtick keys. If I used the multilingual layout, I think AltGr would select / and £ on 3 and so forth.

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      • #23
        microcode code I didn't know multilang Canadian keyboards also used that type of keyboard but it makes sense.
        [email protected]The Brazilian keybord has an extra key at the right shift key other than that it looked the same as the european keybords.
        johanb so it is possible to order a "real keyboard" for +$79 that had slipped pass me, thanks for the heads up. I guess it's possible to order a set of stickers for the keyboard.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by DrYak View Post

          Compose key is your friend. (in opensuse kde that's "right shift+right ctrl") (also note that you push the composed letter one after the other, it's not a key combo, but a key sequence.

          As in "compose", "o", "a" : å,
          "compose", ' " ' "a" : ä
          compose, /, o : ø
          compose, o, e : œ
          compose, a, e : æ
          compose, t, h : þ
          compose, . , i : ı
          compose, =, e : €
          compose, =, Y : ¥
          compose, !, ! : ¡
          compose, . , . : …
          compose, <, < : «

          etc.

          The best thing : This mechanism works regardless of the actual keyboard mapping.
          It only relies on either a physical "compose" key or a keybinding, and then only a sequence of plain ASCII characters present on any keyboard.
          Nearly any caracter used in any latin derivated alphabet can be composed using whatever mapping your current keyboard uses.
          Great tip, but if you use any of those letters often it will become incredibly tedious.
          Personally I would probably smash my keyboard into the wall and buy a new one after a few days.

          Comment


          • #25
            Originally posted by johanb View Post
            Great tip, but if you use any of those letters often it will become incredibly tedious.
            Personally I would probably smash my keyboard into the wall and buy a new one after a few days.
            If you use any of those letters often (like typing your e-mails on a laptop), you use a keyboard layout that matches your language, or use multiple switchable layouts (as Cape suggested).
            The initial comment was about how to type accented characters on a US keyboard (e.g.: a mostly English speaking user, a keyboard mainly used for programming, no other layouts available). I'm just showing there's a way if you need to just quickly type a few (as debianxfce suggested - I was just expanding on other key combos that don't have a dead key).

            Note: putting stickers for showing extra layouts on your current keyboard is cheaper than smashing it an buying a new one.

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