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Android 8.0 "Oreo" Launches

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  • #21
    Someone translated DRM wrong right there. That's Direct Rendering Manager, not Digital Rights Management.

    Apart from that it's great, forcing OEMs to rely on standard Linux driver infrastructure while Android-only stuff is discontinued can only be a good thing.

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    • #22
      DRM in the context of the Android kernel and KMS means Direct Rendering Manager.

      I think a technical author looked up the incorrect acronym.

      edit: should have checked page 2 of the thread first.

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      • #23
        Are there any online resources on how to port Plasma Mobile/Ubuntu phone to a new device? I have two relatively open devices with which I would like to experiment (the second being my current phone, an AGM X1, is supposed to have full source access, albeit behind a NDA, but I hope I wouldn't need to sign it).

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        • #24
          Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
          Are there any online resources on how to port Plasma Mobile/Ubuntu phone to a new device? I have two relatively open devices with which I would like to experiment (the second being my current phone, an AGM X1, is supposed to have full source access, albeit behind a NDA, but I hope I wouldn't need to sign it).
          I suppose that asking this in their mailing lists (ubports for the ubuntu stuff) would yeld more interesting answers.

          Comment


          • #25
            Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
            Someone translated DRM wrong right there. That's Direct Rendering Manager, not Digital Rights Management.

            Apart from that it's great, forcing OEMs to rely on standard Linux driver infrastructure while Android-only stuff is discontinued can only be a good thing.
            Btw, it looks like someone already reported this in their bug tracker and the bug was acknowledged. https://issuetracker.google.com/issues/64904718

            EDIT: And now it's fixed. For those that don't want to register/login to read the bug report, the google's guy said
            "Fixed - thanks for letting us know!"
            Last edited by starshipeleven; 22 August 2017, 07:50 PM.

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            • #26
              well, it would seem most of the talk here isn't coming from anyone actually running a device that supports Oreo (note: I'm not knocking anyone for that, Pixels ain't cheap. Lol)....

              But I do happen to be running Oreo. So far; it's better than Nougat, in a lot of ways.

              * They've further fine-grained permissions.for example; I can control on a per-app basis which apps can install APKs, not from the play store. (Previously, it was universal 'unkown sources').

              * quicksettings, notifications and the settings app have been revamped, in some parts significantly.

              * adaptive icons and emojis have been added/redone. For emojis this is in particular useful; as they far better lined up with WhatsApp and iPhone (better consistency between platforms).

              * boottime is cut in half. App start time seems faster in a few cases

              * performance seems to have improved in a few spots, I'm sure I'll notice more, after a few days of use.

              * picture in picture mode is excellent for multitasking, while watching videos orvideo chatting.

              * audio seems to be improving. One of the audio/music apps I use; beatonal allows you to change buffer size and shows xruns... in nougat I would get a few xruns/underuns, where I don't in Oreo.

              * Bluetooth audio has been revamped. More codecs added and you can control them in developer settings (very handy).

              So far, I have been rather impressed and this release feels like a bigger jump than lollipop to marshmallow (or nougat, which did ni fact have significant technical changes. Just ask the xposed guys. Lol)... I think there are still things that piss me off; like lack if a dark theme in android... I think that the OEM upgrade problem should improve as Google makes android more modular, at it's core... which I hope happens...

              Also; Oreo is totally rootable. I was able to find a experimental build of TWRP (boots via fastboot), so I can sideload apps. So able to have adaway, afwall, kernel auiditor, busybox, etc, etc...

              I haven't run into any bugs yet (although, I'm sure they exist. Lol).

              Maybe my post will be helpful to the curious.

              Comment


              • #27
                Thanks for listing those. I don't think anyone expected a complete OS overhaul, so in that regard Oreo does not disappoint.
                But almost nobody will see any of the above this year. There are literally thousands of Android devices in the wild and the ones that will get Oreo in a timely manner can be counted on your fingers
                Maybe Android P will be able to take advantage of Project Treble?

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by bug77 View Post
                  Thanks for listing those. I don't think anyone expected a complete OS overhaul, so in that regard Oreo does not disappoint.
                  But almost nobody will see any of the above this year. There are literally thousands of Android devices in the wild and the ones that will get Oreo in a timely manner can be counted on your fingers
                  Maybe Android P will be able to take advantage of Project Treble?
                  No problem. I just thought it made sense to add a voice to the conversation who is using Oreo (even if albeit not long. Like 36hrs). I do think it's a good release though, for sure. Ready to be my daily driver...

                  For sure the lack of devices being able to run Oreo is a real problem. Hopefully, project treble will change that, OEMS will adapt and start making their drivers more maintainable too... in all honesty, Nougat screwed more legacy devices than Oreo did though, for two reasons; cameras and hardening features required in kernels...

                  I know myself; I contributed code with digging up backports of seccomp and some of the other security/hardening features for my galaxy s5, so with Cyanogenmod 14.x it was one of the first devices supported... but most devices running old kernels, were basically screwed. (You really need Linux 3.18+, but the s5 was Linux 3.4 with a crapload of backports. Lol).

                  I would say though; we should see some devices able to use Oreo in custom ROMs, before year's end though. Just not from OEMs.

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                  • #29
                    custom ROMs probably roll "8" out in a few months..

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      Originally posted by RelaxTrolls View Post
                      well, it would seem most of the talk here isn't coming from anyone actually running a device that supports Oreo (note: I'm not knocking anyone for that, Pixels ain't cheap. Lol)....

                      But I do happen to be running Oreo. So far; it's better than Nougat, in a lot of ways.

                      * They've further fine-grained permissions.for example; I can control on a per-app basis which apps can install APKs, not from the play store. (Previously, it was universal 'unkown sources').

                      * quicksettings, notifications and the settings app have been revamped, in some parts significantly.

                      * adaptive icons and emojis have been added/redone. For emojis this is in particular useful; as they far better lined up with WhatsApp and iPhone (better consistency between platforms).

                      * boottime is cut in half. App start time seems faster in a few cases

                      * performance seems to have improved in a few spots, I'm sure I'll notice more, after a few days of use.

                      * picture in picture mode is excellent for multitasking, while watching videos orvideo chatting.

                      * audio seems to be improving. One of the audio/music apps I use; beatonal allows you to change buffer size and shows xruns... in nougat I would get a few xruns/underuns, where I don't in Oreo.

                      * Bluetooth audio has been revamped. More codecs added and you can control them in developer settings (very handy).

                      So far, I have been rather impressed and this release feels like a bigger jump than lollipop to marshmallow (or nougat, which did ni fact have significant technical changes. Just ask the xposed guys. Lol)... I think there are still things that piss me off; like lack if a dark theme in android... I think that the OEM upgrade problem should improve as Google makes android more modular, at it's core... which I hope happens...

                      Also; Oreo is totally rootable. I was able to find a experimental build of TWRP (boots via fastboot), so I can sideload apps. So able to have adaway, afwall, kernel auiditor, busybox, etc, etc...

                      I haven't run into any bugs yet (although, I'm sure they exist. Lol).

                      Maybe my post will be helpful to the curious.
                      It sure does man, people seem to be busy and do not bother reading Android OS changelog, at least from major releases. Android Nougat is so much better that KitKat or Lollipop, it's like night and day, yet they don't seem to realize the progress. Yeah it takes some time to get the upgrade on your device, but that's Android dev's fault? No you dumb schmuck, that's your shitty brand fault.

                      Open Source? Hell yeah, go Linux/Unix take over the world.
                      Android? Hell no bro fuck that piece of shit backdoored Open Source OS.

                      WTF?

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