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  • Qt WebBrowser 1.0 Open-Sourced

    Phoronix: Qt WebBrowser 1.0 Open-Sourced

    The Qt Company has announced the opening of Qt WebBrowser, a new embedded-focused web-browser built atop Qt technologies...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...WebBrowser-1.0

  • #2
    How to get this browser? how to install it?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Azrael5 View Post
      How to get this browser? how to install it?
      the original article http://blog.qt.io/blog/2016/07/18/qt-webbrowser-1-0/
      says it is in "demo for device creation" here http://blog.qt.io/blog/2016/07/18/qt-webbrowser-1-0/

      and that the source code git is here http://code.qt.io/cgit/qt-apps/qtwebbrowser.git/

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      • #4
        Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
        the original article http://blog.qt.io/blog/2016/07/18/qt-webbrowser-1-0/
        says it is in "demo for device creation" here http://blog.qt.io/blog/2016/07/18/qt-webbrowser-1-0/

        and that the source code git is here http://code.qt.io/cgit/qt-apps/qtwebbrowser.git/
        there is no installer?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Azrael5 View Post
          there is no installer?
          Qt is a framework for interface developers, they don't provide installers because what they make is for developers, not for consumers.

          This browser will be used in embedded devices, cars, and whatever.

          But it's using WebKit engine, the same used by Chrome/ium, so it's not going to perform much differently.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
            Qt is a framework for interface developers, they don't provide installers because what they make is for developers, not for consumers.

            This browser will be used in embedded devices, cars, and whatever.

            But it's using WebKit engine, the same used by Chrome/ium, so it's not going to perform much differently.
            It would probably take the device that it was intended to run on something like 20 hours to compile it. So there's also the cross compiler setup and all too that would need figured out. It will be interesting to see interfaces developed for it. I kind of like how Qt software looks.
            Last edited by duby229; 18 July 2016, 04:36 PM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by duby229 View Post
              It would probably take the device that it was intended to run on something like 20 hours to compile it. So there's also the cross compiler setup and all too that would need figured out.
              For most embedded hardware, there is a SDK or a toolchain or whatever pre-made cross-compiler system you can drop your code in for compilation, because everyone always assumes that you will use a decently powerful system to compile stuff.

              Decent opensource projects like LEDE are set to first build the toolchain, THEN cross-compile your firmware with it. And it does so automatically.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                Qt is a framework for interface developers, they don't provide installers because what they make is for developers, not for consumers.

                This browser will be used in embedded devices, cars, and whatever.

                But it's using WebKit engine, the same used by Chrome/ium, so it's not going to perform much differently.
                I thought Chrome stopped using WebKit (or, rather, forked it into a seperate engine)?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by 137ben View Post
                  I thought Chrome stopped using WebKit (or, rather, forked it into a seperate engine)?
                  AFAIK it's mostly a trick to keep all its Chrome/ium (and then Opera/Yandex)-specific code separated from the main and more generic project. It's called Blink and is a fork of Webkit Core.

                  Sure they do some hacks here and there but it's like Debian and Ubuntu, not like Cinnamon and Gnome 3, Blink is still a downstream project relying on upstream, not a fork with life of its own.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 137ben View Post
                    I thought Chrome stopped using WebKit (or, rather, forked it into a seperate engine)?
                    Correct, this is based off Chromium and uses the Blink WebKit fork. starshipeleven probably just didn't know of the fork and assumed since it was Chromium based it used WebKit as well.

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