Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Linux Tests Are Coming Of The New Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon (Broadwell)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • darkbasic
    replied
    Originally posted by liam View Post
    you want broadwell, you'll probably have to wait until q2 since intel hasn't announced their quadcore mobile chips yet.
    I remember they were planned for Q1 2015, it seems they are late for some reasons...

    Leave a comment:


  • carewolf
    replied
    Originally posted by darkbasic View Post
    Yes, I meant the 35W Broadwell-H quad-core. I called them "Ultrabook" but I meant Ultrabook-like, which means "high" performance, long battery life, low thickness and low weight. Something like the regretted Sony Vaio Z, which had full-TDP CPUs. With Broadwell we finally have real laptop quad cores,
    Quad cores? You are imagining things. Intel has only released tablet and ultrabook Broadwells so far. The highest of them are 2 cores/4 threads.

    Leave a comment:


  • liam
    replied
    Originally posted by darkbasic View Post
    Yes, I meant the 35W Broadwell-H quad-core. I called them "Ultrabook" but I meant Ultrabook-like, which means "high" performance, long battery life, low thickness and low weight. Something like the regretted Sony Vaio Z, which had full-TDP CPUs. With Broadwell we finally have real laptop quad cores, which means we don't need to spend 4000? anymore to get all the caracteristics above. Any hints?
    Hi darkbasic,

    Hmm, good question. I'm going to assume you don't need discrete graphics, and that you live in a country where all devices are potentially available.
    IF you can make do with a ulv, I'd strongly suggest lenovo x250 (http://www.anandtech.com/show/8822/lenovo-thinkpad-x250). They are priced well, have the best battery life of any device, and should make for a terrific dev laptop.
    If that won't work, and you want broadwell, you'll probably have to wait until q2 since intel hasn't announced their quadcore mobile chips yet.

    Leave a comment:


  • darkbasic
    replied
    Originally posted by liam View Post
    Those don't exist. Ultrabooks use the ulv chips and those are all dual core.
    Iirc, the lowest tdp quads announced are 35W.
    Yes, I meant the 35W Broadwell-H quad-core. I called them "Ultrabook" but I meant Ultrabook-like, which means "high" performance, long battery life, low thickness and low weight. Something like the regretted Sony Vaio Z, which had full-TDP CPUs. With Broadwell we finally have real laptop quad cores, which means we don't need to spend 4000? anymore to get all the caracteristics above. Any hints?

    Originally posted by Luke_Wolf View Post
    quad core... ultrabook... Why don't you just get a real laptop as opposed to a hipsterthin if that's what you want?
    See above.

    Leave a comment:


  • Luke_Wolf
    replied
    Originally posted by darkbasic View Post
    I use Gentoo, I'm willing to spend but I would like a quad core Broadwell ultrabook. Any hints?
    quad core... ultrabook... Why don't you just get a real laptop as opposed to a hipsterthin if that's what you want?

    Leave a comment:


  • wizard69
    replied
    This X11 is very interesting!

    I will wait of course to see what Apple does with the Mac Book Air.

    Leave a comment:


  • liam
    replied
    Originally posted by aphirst View Post
    I have to say, I'm really disappointed to hear about the RAM being soldered to the motherboard. It's like Lenovo don't want me to upgrade from my X220 /w IPS screen and mSATA SSD... Which is a shame, because I'm very keen to move to Broadwell hardware, especially given the prospective performance of their new generation of iGPUs.

    Does this new line feature the "return of the physical TrackPoint mouse buttons" that was heralded elsewhere? If so, a step back in the right direction at least, but the chiclet keyboard remains a let-down.
    The keyboard has, from what I've read, returned to true scissor keys, like the older thinkpads.
    Checkout the x250. That has a much bigger battery option (built-in 3 cell + removable), and you can get a high resolution ips screen. The x220, iirc, only offered 768p, so that alone will make for a nice step up.

    Leave a comment:


  • liam
    replied
    Originally posted by darkbasic View Post
    I use Gentoo, I'm willing to spend but I would like a quad core Broadwell ultrabook. Any hints?
    Those don't exist. Ultrabooks use the ulv chips and those are all dual core.
    Iirc, the lowest tdp quads announced are 35W.

    Leave a comment:


  • liam
    replied
    As Michael has said, this lappy has been getting terrific buzz. My only concerns are battery life (unlike the x250, this doesn't have a removable battery, just a built-in--the new x250 actually seems pretty great but it suffers from the other issue) and relatively weak graphics. By not going with the xx50 chips lenovo is gimping the graphics, especially since you can get hidpi displays with these laptops.
    I might be forced to wait for skylake later in the year....

    Leave a comment:


  • jrun
    replied
    consider gentoo...

    while back you argued that the reason you used ubuntu was it's *wild* adoption by linux _desktop_ users. that is no more since chromiumos which is based on gentoo (albeit with a mistake in picking upstart as its init). i've been bafled by the fact that you benckmark/test mesa, kernel and many more from their git repo and yet you do all that by hand. a source based distro would ease all that and that's just one benefit. also compile time these days are much less and i have only had a chance to try haswell on a cheap business-tier dell machine. with minimum 4g ram that comes with every machine nowdays you can easily compile your whole system in ram and then deploy the image wherever you like. and with the pace that you're going through different machine i guess you can use the "old" ones distcc (distributed compiling) if you don't have a build farm already...

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X