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Canonical Lowers Ubuntu Edge Pricing

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  • phoronix
    started a topic Canonical Lowers Ubuntu Edge Pricing

    Canonical Lowers Ubuntu Edge Pricing

    Phoronix: Canonical Lowers Ubuntu Edge Pricing

    Canonical has listened to the feedback regarding their crowd-funded Ubuntu Edge smart-phone. The company still needs to raise 32 million dollars in the next month, but they have decided to lower the per-unit prices on the phone...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTQxODg

  • MrTheSoulz
    replied
    Originally posted by DanLamb View Post
    Ubuntu Mobile is pushing HTML5 and QML for app development: neither of those are "native". QML is JavaScript based and has automatic garbage collection.

    Android does support C/C++, which is typically what is meant by "native". Tons of Android apps use C/C++ like Chrome and Webkit and most games.

    There are a few great Qt/C++ apps (I think Autodesk Maya), but that's not the strength of desktop Linux.
    i think they allow QT apps, wich are native apps (c++).

    Leave a comment:


  • DanLamb
    replied
    Originally posted by akincer View Post
    Using native programming languages to Ubuntu/Linux (i.e. not Java) means that devs can build on their already existing apps for Ubuntu/Linux and not reinvent the wheel.
    Ubuntu Mobile is pushing HTML5 and QML for app development: neither of those are "native". QML is JavaScript based and has automatic garbage collection.

    Android does support C/C++, which is typically what is meant by "native". Tons of Android apps use C/C++ like Chrome and Webkit and most games.

    There are a few great Qt/C++ apps (I think Autodesk Maya), but that's not the strength of desktop Linux.
    Last edited by DanLamb; 08-08-2013, 11:38 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Delgarde
    replied
    Originally posted by Kivada View Post
    You are aware that technology has progressed and that you can now get 128Gb in an SD card the size of a US postage stamp for around $80 US correct?
    I wasn't, actually. The largest capacity cards I've seen (or can see on local sites) are 64GB, and they're both rare and insanely expensive... in the vicinity of US$350...

    Leave a comment:


  • Kivada
    replied
    Originally posted by Delgarde View Post
    At 128 GB, what else would it be? It's too big to be the usual onboard flash, and obviously it's not going to be spinning disk...
    You are aware that technology has progressed and that you can now get 128Gb in an SD card the size of a US postage stamp for around $80 US correct?

    Leave a comment:


  • akincer
    replied
    Originally posted by dee. View Post
    tl;dr;
    It's pretty clear that you just don't see the value in convergence. That's fine. I do. So does my wife. So do other people I know. You don't *have* to buy convergent device. The market will decide since that's all that really matters anyway. Whether or not it makes sense to you is totally immaterial.

    Leave a comment:


  • Delgarde
    replied
    Originally posted by TAXI View Post
    in fact it's the other way around as a SSD is glued to SATA, so you can't go faster than the SATA bus speed
    Not necessarily... the term SSD also is applied to devices that attach directly to the PCI bus, bypassing traditional drive controllers. They're horribly expensive, though...

    Leave a comment:


  • V10lator
    replied
    Originally posted by Caledar View Post
    To me, SSD means a fast flash based disk whereas flash based storage to me would mean something along the lines of under 30MB/sec
    That's not the definiton of a SSD and there's no reason on board flash can't be faster than a SSD (in fact it's the other way around as a SSD is glued to SATA, so you can't go faster than the SATA bus speed).

    Leave a comment:


  • Caledar
    replied
    Originally posted by Delgarde View Post
    Terminology usage, mostly... it might not be a strict definition, but "SSD" usually implies a physically separate unit, even if the chips are the same ones that would be used onboard...
    To me, SSD means a fast flash based disk whereas flash based storage to me would mean something along the lines of under 30MB/sec

    Leave a comment:


  • Delgarde
    replied
    Originally posted by dee. View Post
    And it's probably worth pointing out that people thought virtual reality and voice-control UI would become the next big thing. They never did. It's easy to point at innovations that have made it big, because we tend to forget all the bad ideas that didn't make it. And it's understandable, because... well, they're bad ideas, they didn't make it, they came and went - and we're more excited about the next big hype. Yet, it's good to bear in mind that not every innovation is a success. Sometimes it's because it's ahead of its time, sometimes it's because it's just executed poorly at first (and it may succeed when someone does it again properly), and sometimes, it's just a plain bad idea that doesn't work.
    Or for another example, touch-oriented interfaces. They work great on mobile devices like tablets and phones, and for specialized things like info kiosks, but every now and then, someone has another go at pushing it for desktop hardware. And that really doesn't work very well, because people quickly find that their arms get sore after a few minutes of use...

    Leave a comment:

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