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Preview: A Cheap 12-Core, 30-Watt Ubuntu Cluster

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  • #11
    Originally posted by oliver View Post
    it is! It's the ikea megasin dish drainer.

    http://www.thisnext.com/item/738161A...N-Dish-drainer

    Also, Ikea makes nice 19" racks too!

    http://wiki.eth-0.nl/index.php/LackRack
    Except that Michael's one clearly states "NORPRO" right on the cover...

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    • #12
      Very interesting indeed!

      I'm definitely looking forward to more ARM benchmarks!

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      • #13
        how are you going to connect all those together?

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        • #14
          "
          This six-board cluster will be running an Ubuntu 12.10 ARM OMAP4 snapshot for the noticeable performance improvements it offers via the Linux 3.4 kernel and GCC 4.7. "

          Michael, you really should checkout the Linaro GCC backlog now and again and use their latest version directly when you test as there's some interesting options in the backlog blueprint

          https://launchpad.net/gcc-linaro/+milestone/backlog
          34 blueprints and 0 bugs targeted

          https://launchpad.net/gcc-linaro
          Linaro GCC 4.7-2012.06

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          • #15
            Originally posted by 89c51 View Post
            how are you going to connect all those together?
            probably through the slow On board 10/100 Ethernet ports but he may get better thoughput with the
            integrated 802.11 b/g/n chip , i don't know if it can do better real throughput than the 100Mbit Ethernet though

            http://pandaboard.org/content/pandaboard-es
            Last edited by popper; 07 June 2012, 11:16 PM.

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            • #16
              Why? I am dubious about how useful this really is.

              1. Does the 30W quoted include an ethernet switch? Presumably you'd need at least 7 ports on the switch (6 for each of the units and 1 uplink port). Or are you assuming that the devices will be connected to a professional switch, in which case, what is the pro-rata power usage for 6 ports on a normal switch (e.g. cisco or something) ? I wouldn't be surprised if it exceeds 30W.


              2. A modern x86 server would have at least 16 cores capable of running 32 threads, but would use a lot more power. But I suspect the x86 would still win on most workloads, especially floating point.

              Anyway, I still think it's a fun project if not a useful one.

              I have a friend who once built a cluster of 5 i386 boards (in ~ 1996, when they were long obsolete) . It was cool.

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              • #17
                I don't have much experience on this matter, but it makes me curious... What method do you use to allocate the workloads to all the boards? Through what protocol - SSH? How will the nodes be managed - through LinuxPMI, or will they remain individual? What programs are well-clusterable?

                I'm thinking about whether I could do something similar on a smaller scale with x86_64 hardware. I'm going to upgrade my PC soon, which will leave some capable hardware behind (in essence a headless terminal - motherboard, CPU, RAM), and since I often need to do tasks that are very computing-intensive (FFmpeg video manipulation, mostly), it would be pretty awesome to utilise it.

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                • #18
                  Expensive

                  This kind of bugs me because BeagleBoards come out at over $100 when there is silicon available at a fraction of this price.

                  I can't understand why these boards need to be so expensive? Lets just take the Rasberry Pi, granted it is under 1GHz and single core, but it is $35, doubling the cores and increasing the CPU speed won't cost more than $5-10.

                  We need some $50 Marvell* Armada 1500 based machines to be built and if I keep seeing these expensive boards appearing I might have to do something about it myself....

                  * These things run cooler than the Kirkwood of the PlugComputer fame.

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                  • #19
                    not that cheap but quite interesting...
                    BTW: HDMI (1.4?) with a/v data support Ethernet/IP 100Mb/s ... hmm KVM/Ethernet someone?
                    on other side i don't see any benefits compared to LAN except processed video output(remote Renderfarm/DVD players/stuff ).
                    how about a bulk of Sitara AM335x (5$) or 25$ rasberyy PI usb powered? and hdmi out.. flashdisk size
                    Last edited by SunnyDrake; 08 June 2012, 07:57 AM.

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