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Google Android Gingerbread Is Using EXT4

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  • phoronix
    started a topic Google Android Gingerbread Is Using EXT4

    Google Android Gingerbread Is Using EXT4

    Phoronix: Google Android Gingerbread Is Using EXT4

    Earlier this year Google announced they would be switching to the EXT4 file-system on their Linux servers (previously they were still using the mature EXT2) and at the same time it was made available they had hired Ted Ts'o, the lead developer of this file-system currently in use by a majority of the new Linux desktop distributions. Google's continuing to love the EXT4 file-system and now with their new Android 2.3 "Gingerbread" operating system for smart-phones and other mobile devices, they are switching to EXT4 there too...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=ODkwMA

  • droidhacker
    replied
    Originally posted by plonoma View Post
    Now if only the drivers where more modular:
    "and updated OpenGL ES graphics drivers"
    Tying drivers with OS upgrades is dumb people.

    (I know updated base drivers is good.
    But the thing is that this is a sign of drivers being bound to certani OS upgrades.)
    The GL drivers for most android devices are 100% proprietary, not part of AOSP. If they have updated the GL drivers, they are referring to the software rendering.

    Leave a comment:


  • plonoma
    replied
    Now if only the drivers where more modular:
    "and updated OpenGL ES graphics drivers"
    Tying drivers with OS upgrades is dumb people.

    (I know updated base drivers is good.
    But the thing is that this is a sign of drivers being bound to certani OS upgrades.)

    Leave a comment:


  • Stebs
    replied
    Originally posted by squirrl View Post
    Journalled file systems on a flash device make no sense.
    I think it's rather your sentence (used in such a broad way) that makes no sense.

    And btw, especially Ext4 has a "no journal mode", no need to go back to the old Ext2.

    Leave a comment:


  • zouboulou
    replied
    Originally posted by squirrl View Post
    Journalled file systems on a flash device make no sense.

    Most Android phones run in memory anyhow, 512MB if you're lucky to have a phone with that much space in memory.

    2-16GB file systems are better off with Fat32. Due to copywrite problems they possibly be better off with ext2.

    1. barrier=0 or barrier=1 ?

    2. Does Android write data to the file system like Tso says it should?

    3. fsck.ext4 included in the tools?

    * When will we get a proper task-killer from G0ogle?
    You obviously don't understand filesystems, different memories and operating systems in general "Android run in memory" (so naive)

    Leave a comment:


  • squirrl
    replied
    What's the benefit for Phones?

    Journalled file systems on a flash device make no sense.

    Most Android phones run in memory anyhow, 512MB if you're lucky to have a phone with that much space in memory.

    2-16GB file systems are better off with Fat32. Due to copywrite problems they possibly be better off with ext2.

    1. barrier=0 or barrier=1 ?

    2. Does Android write data to the file system like Tso says it should?

    3. fsck.ext4 included in the tools?

    * When will we get a proper task-killer from G0ogle?

    Leave a comment:


  • zouboulou
    replied
    can only edit post for 1min and phoronixwent down for 2 min when i edited lol..
    Anyway http://project-voodoo.org/ to make ur SGS use EXT4, its not a bad hardware memory issue but a software bug. Also XXJPU firmware fixes it (but its a beta)

    Leave a comment:


  • zouboulou
    replied
    It's very simple.
    When using raw flash access, they use YAFFS (they use it on the Nexus S too!!)
    When using flash that has a disk emulation layer, like the Samsung's oneNand/mNand, then they use EXT4, because YAFFS doesn't work on that, and wear leveling is already implemented at the emulation layer.

    That's what the Nexus S also uses, and the Galaxy S uses (the SGS only uses that in fact, the Nexus S has a YAFFS part and a EXT4 part)

    They're both just fine and using EXT4 on top isnt especially always faster or slower than YAFFS, it depends on the chip implementation too.

    Leave a comment:


  • deanjo
    replied
    Originally posted by _txf_ View Post
    Since forever. Unless of course you place an ftl before the nand
    He clarified his post. His original statement was broad and vague.

    Leave a comment:


  • _txf_
    replied
    Originally posted by deanjo View Post
    Since when?
    Since forever. Unless of course you place an ftl before the nand

    Leave a comment:

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