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Coreboot To Be Shown Today With An Intel Meteor Lake Laptop

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  • Coreboot To Be Shown Today With An Intel Meteor Lake Laptop

    Phoronix: Coreboot To Be Shown Today With An Intel Meteor Lake Laptop

    Going back to 2022 we've seen work by Intel engineers on adding Meteor Lake SoC support to Coreboot while to date there hasn't been much in the way of actual Intel Core Ultra "Meteor Lake" laptops with Coreboot as a replacement to the proprietary BIOS/firmware. But to be shown later today is one of the first laptop designs using these latest Intel mobile processors and running the Dasharo downstream of Coreboot...

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    At today's virtual event, they will be showing the upcoming NovaCustom V54/V56 laptops that feature Intel Core Ultra "Meteor Lake" CPUs and running the Dasharo Coreboot firmware.
    I've been using a NovaCustom laptop with an Alder Lake cpu at work since December, also with Dasharo Coreboot. It's a very impressive and stable laptop with some nice features like disabling Intel's IME via a coreboot setting. I'd like to see if my company will pick up one of these new Meteor Lake laptops from NovaCustom later this year, their prices are quite reasonable and international shipping from the Netherlands was surprisingly cheap.

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    • #3
      I wonder why they aren't teaming up with AMD, given the company is actually committed to a full coreboot transition in 2026/27

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Errinwright View Post
        I wonder why they aren't teaming up with AMD, given the company is actually committed to a full coreboot transition in 2026/27
        Dasharo says it's a lack of actual commitment by AMD -

        Why there is no AMD mainboard supported in Dasharo ?


        Unfortunately, from the perspective of a small open-source firmware vendor, it isn't easy to work with AMD. Despite our experience with AMD SoCs since 2016, we could not yet deliver Dasharo for a modern (Zen core-based) platform. We're trying hard, but Intel has a better ecosystem for open-source firmware development.

        The reason for that state may be because AMD is in a rush, and they are understaffed in all areas compared to their success. We've been doing AMD open-source firmware development for 6+ years, including our yearly reports of open-source firmware status at FOSDEM, but the level of support for small volume firmware development companies is not yet at the level of competition.

        AGESA distribution was a problem in the past, but we solved that, and Dasharo for AMD is possible. Because Dynamic Root of Trust can work without blob, we favor AMD, but we can't do anything without a partner who can sponsor the development effort. We are on the market of open-source firmware vendors, not hardware vendors.

        Last edited by andyprough; 13 June 2024, 06:47 PM.

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        • #5
          So not really lack of commitment, just that Dasharo doesn't think AMD would spend the resources to fund it. Which makes sense, given that AMD is currently spending all of it's UEFI funding on OpenSIL development and then pushing much bigger UEFI vendors to move to coreboot. If their plans are much larger, why fund and spend developer resources on helping a small startup do what you're already doing on a much larger scale? Especially when the startup admits that it's entirely possible for them to make an AMD coreboot board, but they just choose not to do so because AMD isn't paying them.
          Last edited by Daktyl198; 13 June 2024, 07:21 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Daktyl198 View Post
            So not really lack of commitment, just that Dasharo doesn't think AMD would spend the resources to fund it. Which makes sense, given that AMD is currently spending all of it's UEFI funding on OpenSIL development and then pushing much bigger UEFI vendors to move to coreboot. If their plans are much larger, why fund and spend developer resources on helping a small startup do what you're already doing on a much larger scale? Especially when the startup admits that it's entirely possible for them to make an AMD coreboot board, but they just choose not to do so because AMD isn't paying them.
            You don't need AMD to pay for the job. You need AMD to provide production level OpenSIL plus field engineer support in case you can't get their code working with the documentation provided and need to consult with them - those are the employees that AMD has to pay to support external entities that wants to do the job. OpenSIL so far is public preview code for Genoa, you can't make AM4/AM5 with that. No idea about what they can do with AGESA, when I asked about AM4 about 2 years ago they said they couldn't redistribute it so didn't upstreamed a DFI industrial Ryzen Embedded board that was already done for a customer.
            ONCE you get silicon vendor support, you can look for someone to pay for the job. NLNet put grants for funding the MSI Z690-A (DDR5) and Z790-P. But they happened because you had Intel FSP available and Intel Premier Support, which helped to figure out PCIe CLKREQ routing without Motherboard schematics (It was mentioned in one of the presentations from about 2 years ago).

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