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Qualcomm Talks Up Their Linux Support For The Snapdragon X Elite

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  • #11
    Seems like it will take some time to get it working properly on Linux then. Let's hope in a couple years we will have ARM PC's that can compete with Apple's hardware.

    I will be surprised if they actually get hardware video decoding working on Chrome without any hacks.
    Google explicitly said in the past they won't support this officially and it's a shame.

    This is one of the reasons I gave up on AMD and went with a Macbook, something I never thought I would do.
    And no regrets. Everything just works efficiently. No fiddling with Chrome flags that break every couple of releases.
    AV1 decoding was broken in a Chrome release and they fixed it as soon as possible.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by nfrenay View Post
      I will be surprised if they actually get hardware video decoding working on Chrome without any hacks.
      Google explicitly said in the past they won't support this officially and it's a shame.
      How can anybody fix it in a closed source software? And Chromium was cut from Google's features.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by Ladis View Post

        What's the point to advertise to a 2% marketshare? Those Linux fans will buy it even half working, for fun, and will fix the drivers themselves (e.g. that's the principle of PinePhone).
        4 % with a growth of roughly 40 % in the last year without any real slowing down, in the Desktop market alone. As suggested, since the server market would be very interesting for Qualcomm too, where they wouldn't have any choice other than supporting Linux, it would be a wasted effort to ignore the ever growing desktop marketshare, especially when Windows simply isn't that interesting for them.

        And Steam is very important for people to use Linux at all. People also want occasional gaming and not to be limited to 1/100th of games, where there's a Linux port. In fact, half of the ports will not work either, as they are for x86.
        Hangover is back continuing their effort to let Windows x86 apps run on Linux arm64 since Wine is at a point where this is an option.

        PS: Qualcomm didn't lose money, it was Microsoft and the device makers ($1B + $1B on Windows RT).​
        Even if they managed to have the OEMs buy every single chip they actually produced, they pretty much lost money due to the devices selling so extremely poorly. Otherwise they could have sold that many more SoCs.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by Ladis View Post
          If you mean booting, that's independent on the CPU arch. Many devices support UEFI (e.g. Microsoft standardized it in servers). And UEFI supports running its bytecode (e.g. like .NET or Java), so the PCIe card initialization is one universal code being able to run on any CPU arch (no need to flash card's BIOS or emulate x86 when booting).
          It's nice if at least booting / UEFI bios is standardized on ARM like you say, but I know things like USB drivers are still not. On x86, for example you don't need to develop separate USB drivers for each device.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by Artim View Post

            4 % with a growth of roughly 40 % in the last year
            It was dloubled with Steam Deck. A device, which is not primarily for desktop usage, and your changes in the system will be overwritten with system updates.

            Originally posted by Artim View Post

            Hangover is back continuing their effort to let Windows x86 apps run on Linux arm64 since Wine is at a point where this is an option.
            Hangover is much slower with the emulation in Windows on ARM. Both are far from Rosetta 2 on Macs. (At least, WINE is working on embedding a CPU emulator in it, so - after years - it will be as fast as in Windows on ARM.)

            Originally posted by Artim View Post

            Even if they managed to have the OEMs buy every single chip they actually produced, they pretty much lost money due to the devices selling so extremely poorly. Otherwise they could have sold that many more SoCs.
            The chip is sold at a price no matter how the final device will be good, be priced, and how much it will sell.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by user1 View Post

              It's nice if at least booting / UEFI bios is standardized on ARM like you say, but I know things like USB drivers are still not. On x86, for example you don't need to develop separate USB drivers for each device.
              USB drivers are CPU arch independent. As long as it's opensource, you can compile them for ARM. In fact, most of them are in the kernel tree.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by nfrenay View Post
                Seems like it will take some time to get it working properly on Linux then. Let's hope in a couple years we will have ARM PC's that can compete with Apple's hardware.
                Doesn't look like it will be that much later than the devices hitting the market. No idea if dates even have been announced yet, but Linux 6.11 is literally about 16 weeks from now. It's not that much.

                I will be surprised if they actually get hardware video decoding working on Chrome without any hacks.
                Google explicitly said in the past they won't support this officially and it's a shame.
                That was before they realized that it's just dumb to have Linux as a base, yet reinveting the wheel for everything. And with their efforts to bring ChromeOS closer to your run of the mill Linux distro - called Lacros - they inadvertantly need to support that too. Right now they are working on it, mainly for Intel chips, as it seems that they still require some patch for Mesa on AMD, but progress is there: https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=244031&p=37


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                • #18
                  Originally posted by Ladis View Post

                  How can anybody fix it in a closed source software? And Chromium was cut from Google's features.
                  Companies can work together, y'know? And ChromeOS - and the Lacros project - are yet another reason why they really want to support Linux this time.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by Ladis View Post

                    It was dloubled with Steam Deck. A device, which is not primarily for desktop usage, and your changes in the system will be overwritten with system updates.
                    Tall theory. But still, nothing more than that.

                    The chip is sold at a price no matter how the final device will be good, be priced, and how much it will sell.
                    More units sold -> more money. Is that basic concept really that difficult to grasp?

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by Artim View Post

                      Companies can work together, y'know? And ChromeOS - and the Lacros project - are yet another reason why they really want to support Linux this time.
                      They support only the Linux inside ChromeOS.

                      Originally posted by Artim View Post

                      Tall theory. But still, nothing more than that.
                      It was discussed here in the regular Steam statistics.

                      Originally posted by Artim View Post

                      More units sold -> more money. Is that basic concept really that difficult to grasp?

                      Is it difficult to grasp that phones are 100x-1000x more sales? Even for Apple Macs are just for fun (and to hold you in the ecosystem).

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