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Jolla's Former Management Acquires The Business

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  • GI_Jack
    replied
    Originally posted by attah View Post


    It is the only mobile Linux OS daily-driven by a significant number of people. That says a lot.
    There are no significant user base for Jolla. At all.

    Again, you'd see Graphene or Lineage being the leading community forks of Android that people actually use. They are as much FOSS as Jola is. They are serious business daily driver OSes. Jolla is not.

    Leave a comment:


  • ThomasD
    replied
    Originally posted by partcyborg View Post

    This is 100% false. Google play store and apps work flawlessly on LineageOS and AOSP roms and derivatives. I am typing this on a OnePlus 9 pro running crdroid (a lineage derivative) with full google play store. My device even passes safetynet
    Exactly, you don't write it on LineageOS. LineageOS comes without Google Play Services and you cannot install them. You either need to rebuild with the Google stuff as system-apps or you modify the system partition of LineageOS. It does NOT work on stock LineageOS without mods.

    Leave a comment:


  • cj.wijtmans
    replied
    Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post

    The reason why blackberry died is simple. blackberry died because the market died, no one wants secure phones anymore aside from government agencies. Blackberry tried to stick with it by outsourcing the phone itself to another company and making an android device but that didn't pan out so RIM killed that off. It's really as simple as that, even if blackberry managed to make a really good android phone, without it being secure, they had nothing, and no one wanted secure.
    Secure from whom?

    Leave a comment:


  • Quackdoc
    replied
    Originally posted by bug77 View Post
    It's the ecosystem. As a new provider, you need to convince all developers of apps with any traction to make it available for your OS. Look how hard Apple is fighting for iMessages, for example. Plus, people have already bought a number of apps for their platform of choice. They won't be happy to pay for them again.
    TL;DR If Microsoft, who had a competent offer on their hands at a time when Android and iOS weren't nearly as entrenched, couldn't pull it off, no one will.
    No. you don't need to, Waydroid works absolutely great, you only need to convince one or two developers to make a semi decent UI. that's it. Just make a phone that actually has the fundamentals down good, and a lot of people would be willing to migrate. Waydroid can go a long way in that initial hump for a lot of people. MS couldn't do it because they made 2 or 3 generations phones before giving up.

    You do need some developers of course to get the fundamental stuff down. But there is not a single "Android phone" which is actually somewhat familiar and usable. Again, get the fundamentals down, Things like Multitask button support, Home and Global back buttons. A decent settings UI, a camera app worth half a damn, A browser is critical, something also woefully lacking. and don't get me wrong, I understand that things like a global back button are a LOT harder then they initially seem, but that is an absolute requirement for me and loads of people. lack of back buttons were one of the biggest issues a lot of people found when trying to migrate from android to iOS.

    I myself have a chuwi hi10x tablet, It too is a touch primary device, so it shares the majority of usage that a phone would do. Not a single spin I have tried on it is even remotely close to a decent experience for non hardcore tech enthusiasts. Apps don't matter at all if the core usability of the device is crippled

    Leave a comment:


  • Old Grouch
    replied
    Originally posted by bug77 View Post

    And yet some still haven't got the memo: two OSes is all the fragmentation the mobile world can handle. There's no room for more.
    Any other OS would need to support one of the existing ecosystems, if it expects any level of market penetration. It can't support the iOS ecosystem, because Apple won't let anyone play in their yard. So it would have to be something Android-friendly. Anything else will just join your list above.


    Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post
    I actually strongly disagree with this. for a lot of people, just the basics are actually necessary, the reason they don't take off is because they fail to do even that. Linux phones could easily take of if there was at least one phone with a semi-decent UI and handling and at least a somewhat consistent application handling scheme. Global back button, Home button, Multitask button. KDE is making some OK mobile apps, you can even run them on android, but actually interacting with these apps is actually a terrible experience.


    Originally posted by Old Grouch View Post
    How many car manufacturers is the car market handling? What is the fundamental difference between the car market and the phone O/S market that means the phone market can handle only two O/S manufacturers?


    Originally posted by bug77 View Post
    It's the ecosystem. As a new provider, you need to convince all developers of apps with any traction to make it available for your OS. Look how hard Apple is fighting for iMessages, for example. Plus, people have already bought a number of apps for their platform of choice. They won't be happy to pay for them again.
    TL;DR If Microsoft, who had a competent offer on their hands at a time when Android and iOS weren't nearly as entrenched, couldn't pull it off, no one will.
    It's not the ecosystem as such: it's the oligopoly. In a proper competitive market none of the competitors would have the market power to stifle competition. It is a failure of market regulation (even Adam Smith was in favour of regulated markets.). Vertical integration of phone operating system and 'app' store is not necessary, as the PC Desktop software market showed, despite Microsoft's distortions. Being forced to use Google's or Apple's app store is like being forced to buy Ford petrol if you buy a Ford car. Finance and Government ID apps are some of the worst at pushing people into the walled gardens: in some cases there are no viable alternatives, even though some people cannot use smartphones*, and some do not wish to use a smartphone.

    *It is a significant problem for profoundly disabled people, and is not solved by ignoring it. I'm tired of hearing 'But surely...'. I know several people with cerebral palsy who cannot operate a smartphone, and a couple of people without hands (no doubt the various wars and other military operations will generate more). Their lives are made unbelievably difficult by the headlong rush into the smartphone-app driven world. Technology is meant to be an enabler, not yet another way in which people can be discriminated against. The advice about not getting old, sick, or disabled is, unfortunately, still very true.

    Leave a comment:


  • bug77
    replied
    Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post

    I actually strongly disagree with this. for a lot of people, just the basics are actually necessary, the reason they don't take off is because they fail to do even that. Linux phones could easily take of if there was at least one phone with a semi-decent UI and handling and at least a somewhat consistent application handling scheme. Global back button, Home button, Multitask button. KDE is making some OK mobile apps, you can even run them on android, but actually interacting with these apps is actually a terrible experience.
    Originally posted by Old Grouch View Post

    How many car manufacturers is the car market handling? What is the fundamental difference between the car market and the phone O/S market that means the phone market can handle only two O/S manufacturers?
    It's the ecosystem. As a new provider, you need to convince all developers of apps with any traction to make it available for your OS. Look how hard Apple is fighting for iMessages, for example. Plus, people have already bought a number of apps for their platform of choice. They won't be happy to pay for them again.
    TL;DR If Microsoft, who had a competent offer on their hands at a time when Android and iOS weren't nearly as entrenched, couldn't pull it off, no one will.

    Leave a comment:


  • varikonniemi
    replied
    Originally posted by Old Grouch View Post

    I'm terminally lazy. Could you provide a link to the Internet archive/Wayback machine where Jolla said that? Even better if it is still on Jolla's own website.
    No i cannot as it is more than a decade ago, and i already remember that they never promised 100% open source as i think they always said that for instance alien dalvik cannot be made open.

    Leave a comment:


  • Old Grouch
    replied
    Originally posted by varikonniemi View Post
    Sailfish was promising when it first started, they promised that they will release the OS as 100% open source once their first phone has entered the market. Then surprisingly they started coming up with excuses until they admitted that it was all lies, no open sourcing is in the works. If they can lie to you that blatantly, what else are they willing to do to you in the closed depths of their software stack?
    I'm terminally lazy. Could you provide a link to the Internet archive/Wayback machine where Jolla said that? Even better if it is still on Jolla's own website.

    Leave a comment:


  • Old Grouch
    replied
    Originally posted by bug77 View Post

    And yet some still haven't got the memo: two OSes is all the fragmentation the mobile world can handle. There's no room for more.
    Any other OS would need to support one of the existing ecosystems, if it expects any level of market penetration. It can't support the iOS ecosystem, because Apple won't let anyone play in their yard. So it would have to be something Android-friendly. Anything else will just join your list above.
    How many car manufacturers is the car market handling? What is the fundamental difference between the car market and the phone O/S market that means the phone market can handle only two O/S manufacturers?

    Leave a comment:


  • Quackdoc
    replied
    Originally posted by bug77 View Post
    And yet some still haven't got the memo: two OSes is all the fragmentation the mobile world can handle. There's no room for more.
    I actually strongly disagree with this. for a lot of people, just the basics are actually necessary, the reason they don't take off is because they fail to do even that. Linux phones could easily take of if there was at least one phone with a semi-decent UI and handling and at least a somewhat consistent application handling scheme. Global back button, Home button, Multitask button. KDE is making some OK mobile apps, you can even run them on android, but actually interacting with these apps is actually a terrible experience.

    Leave a comment:

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