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Intel Laptop Users Should Avoid Linux 5.19.12 To Avoid Potentially Damaging The Display

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  • berarma
    replied
    Originally posted by flower View Post

    arch is a community based distribution with no company backing. and it is known for bleeding edge
    *you* are the tester
    I'm surprised at how many Arch users don't realize they're the testers for the rest of community.

    Leave a comment:


  • Anux
    replied
    Blaming rolling release or stable distros doesn't help, one might be more prone to hazardous updates, but you can always be affected by bad luck. Windows has the exact same problem, they can't test every possible configuration. Even back in the days when they had a proper test team and all employees used the developement version as production system.
    Heck even Apple with its small hardware selection had bad updates that bricked laptops.

    There is simply no solution to the problem. You can't test everything.

    If your'e money depends on it you should probably have a good recovery plan (called backup and spare hardware) that gets you to a working state in under 90 min. Relying on stable is just russian roulette, if you have a backup you can also use the most experimental bleeding edge you want, but stable should give you less downtime in general.

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  • HD7950
    replied
    Originally posted by elatllat View Post
    I have found ~5 bugs in 5.10.X LTS RCs; they are not well tested,
    And that is the uncomfortable truth that many do not want to accept. Linux is not stable due to the procedure used in releasing supposedly stable versions of the kernel. I have always thought that the most reliable versions of a kernel are the .0 ones. Maintaining 6 LTS versions is really stupid, a couple of them is enough, and please before applying a patch to a stable branch, make sure that it does not create new problems.

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  • Vistaus
    replied
    Originally posted by elatllat View Post
    I have found ~5 bugs in 5.10.X LTS RCs; they are not well tested,
    Shh, don't let the LTS lovers crew here you!

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  • Vistaus
    replied
    Originally posted by piorunz View Post

    At some point, almost all bleeding-edge wannabes (read: beta testers) will get tired of ridiculous errors no one else have and get back to stable distros with tail tucked between their legs.
    I actually went back to rolling releases as I did run into issues with so-called "stable" or "LTS" distros. Don't get me wrong: rolling releases are error-prone too, but at least I get updates faster to solve them. With stable/LTS, I couldn't get it solved because the updates I needed weren't coming.

    And no, I did not mess up my system - I used pretty much all the defaults.

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  • elatllat
    replied
    I have found ~5 bugs in 5.10.X LTS RCs; they are not well tested,

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  • mppix
    replied
    Originally posted by fong38 View Post

    So will stable release distros, except breakages will occur only at certain time points and with a much higher chance as you'll update everything at once.
    I still have to break Debian stable (with backports). Flatpak really helps having up-to-date applications and not needing to install 3rd party apps by unsupported means.

    Number one way to break (any?) stable release was still the Nvidia driver. Hopefully that changes now with >515.x

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  • sophisticles
    replied
    Sadly this isn't the first time Linux, or a linux based OS, has destroyed hardware:



    Author: Joe Barr As reported yesterday on Slashdot, MandrakeSoft has found a serious problem when using Mandrake Linux 9.2 with some models of CD-Rom drives made by LG Electronics. Updated The errata page describes the following scenario: “Installing 9.2 and being told unable to install the base system and subsequent reboot reveals that CD-ROM is …





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  • Luke
    replied
    Originally posted by macemoneta View Post

    That is, of course, an "off label" use of a Chromebook; you have to disable the write protection and security to install a new BIOS and OS. However, that also means your device only supports the legacy BIOS, not the replacement UEFI, which doesn't have that issue. Many Chromebooks (50 new models) were added to UEFI support recently, so you may want to update to see if you now have the option of UEFI installation.
    Legacy BIOS (via compatablity mode in UEFI boards or SeaBIOS in that Chromebook) is all I have ever used. The problem with the Chromebook firmware on that generation is that the write protection and security are automatically re-enabled if you accidently press the space bar prior to boot, and cannot be re-disabled except from inside ChromeOS, which has been removed. This is chicken-and-egg and a "soft-brick." I deemed that too big a hassle (could lose the OS while deployed to out of town protests/direct actions away from my desktop) and replaced the machine with a UEFI laptop of a model from which I could get to the UEFI screen without ever activating or running Windows. This was checked online prior to purchase. I still have the Chromebook,replacing the Chrome version of Coreboot with upstream Coreboot would fix the spacebar antifeature but I was living off-grid,with limited solar power to run the desktop and needed to work fast and simple. I was at the limits of cell coverage, have never had a landline, so downloading a massive multi-GB recovery image wasn't really an option.Would be a LOT of driving in that area to find a wi-fi connection big enough for that job
    Last edited by Luke; 04 October 2022, 07:22 PM.

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  • piorunz
    replied
    Haha more bleeding edge drama

    Manjaro Shipped Broken Kernel on Apple M1 Systems

    I don't know how people can stand this in long term. Windows 98 was more stable.

    Leave a comment:

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