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HP Dev One With Ryzen 7 PRO 5850U Competes Well Against Intel's Core i7 1280P "Alder Lake P" On Linux

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  • HP Dev One With Ryzen 7 PRO 5850U Competes Well Against Intel's Core i7 1280P "Alder Lake P" On Linux

    Phoronix: HP Dev One With Ryzen 7 PRO 5850U Competes Well Against Intel's Core i7 1280P "Alder Lake P" On Linux

    With my review last month of the HP Dev One laptop powered by an AMD Ryzen 7 PRO 5850U and running Pop!_OS I benchmarked it against various laptops I had locally with both AMD and Intel CPUs, including the likes of the very common Tiger Lake SoCs. At the time I hadn't any newer Alder Lake P laptops but now with a Core i7 1280P laptop in hand, here is a look at how that AMD Cezanne Linux laptop can compete with Intel's brand new Alder Lake P SoCs with the flagship Core i7 1280P.

    https://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=31257

  • #2
    I still don't understand where are all the laptops based on Ryzen 6600U/6800U - HP.com has some but they all start at $2200 which is insane.

    I still don't understand why there's not been a single formal professional review of Intel's Alder Lake U CPUs, e.g. 1235U or 1265U.

    I'd love to replace my aging laptop based on Core i5 6200U which is simply too slow and totally incapable of running any games but there's nothing for me: Intel XE in Alder Lakes is the same as in Tiger Lakes and it trails even the Vega iGPU found in the mobile Ryzen 5000 series. The Ryzen 6000 RDNA2 runs circles around Intel XE but again, there are zero affordable laptops based on 6600U/6800U and 6000H(S) laptops all come with a discrete GPU which I refuse to have.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by birdie View Post
      I still don't understand where are all the laptops based on Ryzen 6600U/6800U - HP.com has some but they all start at $2200 which is insane.

      It is a premium cpu for premium laptops... at premium prices. Zen 4 apus will bring that down to consumer.

      5000 series are affordable and perfectly capable. Intel scores some synthetic victories, but amd enjoys a proportional advantage in multiple performance metrics that actually matter.

      I still don't understand why there's not been a single formal professional review of Intel's Alder Lake U CPUs, e.g. 1235U or 1265U.
      My guess is not enough people care.

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      • #4
        Michael

        Typo/grammar.

        Page 1 "4.8GHz and a efficient-core" should be "4.8GHz and an efficient-core"

        Page 6 missing capitaliztion: "if relying a lot on Python scripts," should be "If relying a lot on Python scripts,"

        Page 7 "APU withe refreshed" should be "APU with the refreshed"

        Otherwise, very interesting benchmark results.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by JEBjames View Post
          Michael

          Typo/grammar.

          Page 1 "4.8GHz and a efficient-core" should be "4.8GHz and an efficient-core"

          Page 6 missing capitaliztion: "if relying a lot on Python scripts," should be "If relying a lot on Python scripts,"

          Page 7 "APU withe refreshed" should be "APU with the refreshed"

          Otherwise, very interesting benchmark results.
          whoops thanks, fixed.
          Michael Larabel
          https://www.michaellarabel.com/

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          • #6
            The Ryzen 7 PRO 5850U had an average SoC power consumption of 14.1 Watts and a peak of 30 Watts while the Core i7 1280P had a 29.5 Watt average and a maximum power draw of 76 Watts.
            the Core i7 1280P came out overall inline with the Ryzen 7 PRO 5850U performance.
            Ouch Intel. Twice as much power needed for similar performance. That's devastating.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by moson View Post
              Ouch Intel. Twice as much power needed for similar performance. That's devastating.
              Alder Lake has very high ceiling for turbo boost. Furthermore, their P-cores are designed to clock very high. So, it doesn't take very many threads for power consumption on Alder Lake to really shoot up. And performance scales very poorly with power, at the top of the range.

              In contrast, here's the power/core scaling on Ryzen 6900 HS (sorry, I can't find the same graph for the 5000-series or Alder Lake):



              So, you need at least 2 threads to even exceed 15 W, whereas I'm sure I'd seen a benchmark where Intel was using up to like 48 W with a single thread.
              Last edited by coder; 01 July 2022, 02:11 PM.

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              • #8
                Possibly off-topic, but I wonder if this would also tell us something about Framework's new motherboard too since it also rocks a 1280p processors at top tier.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by moson View Post



                  Ouch Intel. Twice as much power needed for similar performance. That's devastating.
                  Looks like when Lisa Su throwed shade at Intel she wasn't lying. She said Ryzen didn't need two different types of cores on their CPUs, because Ryzen can be both a efficient core and a power one.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
                    Looks like when Lisa Su throwed shade at Intel she wasn't lying. She said Ryzen didn't need two different types of cores on their CPUs, because Ryzen can be both a efficient core and a power one.
                    The real test is going to be when Begamo (128-core Zen 4c EPYC) or its successor goes up against Sierra Forest (Intel's first E-core Xeon).

                    In the near term, it should be interesting to see what AMD has to offer against Alder Lake N (which is what they're calling the next Chromebook SoC; successor to Jasper Lake). Say what you want about Golden Cove (Alder Lake's P-cores), but Gracemont (its E-cores) is a different animal.

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