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The Framework Laptop Is Great For A Linux-Friendly, Upgradeable/Modular Laptop

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  • #41
    Originally posted by arQon View Post
    SD cards are trash, and even laptops - which are the only things that have ever bothered with that asstarded form factor,
    They're also used in cameras, sound recorders, action cameras (e.g. Go Pros), drones, and various other things (e.g. car dashboard/windshield cameras).

    Before phones had high-quality cameras built into them, it would be common for people to use the SD card slot to transfer photos from their digital camera to their laptop for uploading or just to free up space on their SD card. Now that cell phones have basically replaced non-professional digital cameras, there's less of a use case, but I think you still probably underestimate how common SD cards remain, especially for sophisticated users like those buying this sort of laptop.

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    • #42
      Originally posted by coder View Post
      but I think you still probably underestimate how common SD cards remain, especially for sophisticated users like those buying this sort of laptop.
      I've written the software FOR some of those "sophisticated users" devices (including some that, yes, had SD card support :P), and I still say at least 99.9% of laptop users would be at least as well off with a $3 USB adaptor instead.
      To pick nits, the target was 98%, and I find it pretty hard to believe that 1 in every 50 laptop owners not only has ANY use for an SD card at all, but also uses it so frequently and so urgently (perhaps while taking video of themselves skydiving? :P) that a dedicated built-in reader - potentially on a pop-out plastic tray with the strength of balsa wood - is even desirable for them, let alone a deal-breaker given that adaptors exist.
      As is doubtless obvious, personally I would very much *prefer* an adaptor over having circuitry and space wasted on built-in SD support: though I'll admit I did actually use the SD slot on my laptop exactly once.

      I'm actually quite curious to know who's closer to the truth. On the one hand, there's clearly a strong argument to be made for there being at least a *perceived* market for them still, since all but the lowest-end laptops (and Apple, of course) continue to ship with them. On the other hand though, given all the crap involved LIKE the pop-out trays, and the circuitry, and etc, I suspect laptop manufacturers see it as simply free money, with them wasting x$ on the components but charging 8x the amount as a way to bolster margins.

      (I do very much like your "sophisticated users" euphemism though! The only people I've ever seen actually use an SD card that way were absolutely NOT "sophisticated" at all: they were just non-technical people who really liked buying gadgets (nothing wrong with that) and had enough spare money that they were happy to spend a fortune on DSLRs etc).

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      • #43
        Originally posted by arQon View Post
        (I do very much like your "sophisticated users" euphemism though! The only people I've ever seen actually use an SD card that way were absolutely NOT "sophisticated" at all: they were just non-technical people who really liked buying gadgets (nothing wrong with that) and had enough spare money that they were happy to spend a fortune on DSLRs etc).
        So, someone working on drones or other robots doesn't qualify as a sophisticated user? That's an odd definition you have. Fine. I think a more industry-standard term is "power users".

        Anyway, such a modular laptop seems aimed as much at gadget freaks as anyone else.

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        • #44
          Originally posted by coder View Post
          So, someone working on drones or other robots doesn't qualify as a sophisticated user?
          "Working on"? Absolutely! "Flying one around like a jackass" though, very much not.

          Spending $4000 on a high-end camera when you're a middle manager doesn't make you a photographer, sophisticated or otherwise. Similarly, buying a drone doesn't make you a pilot: it makes you a child who never outgrew RC cars (again, nothing wrong with that) who now has a lot of disposable income. That's what I'm saying. How you're conflating "I like buying toys, which explicitly ARE toys" with "I am knowledgeable about multiple forms of technology, and have a specific workflow for these toys based around that knowledge" is a leap of faith that I don't see at all, sorry.

          > I think a more industry-standard term is "power users".

          Close: the marketing term is actually "prosumer". (Yes, it really is that cringey. :P)

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          • #45
            Originally posted by cbxbiker61 View Post
            I like what they've done with the Framework laptop. There are two things at this point that would hold me back from purchasing it though.

            1. AMD processor and graphics
            2. High res/non glare display

            I've fallen in love with My Lenovo Ideapad 16 Pro with it's Ryzen 5800H and 2560x1600(16:10) non glare display.
            Those are exactly the same blockers for me.
            Hoping this will change when new AMD gen arrives with USB4 (I don't expect any new product being offered until then considering the globalized chip shortage everywhere, they'll be glad if they have clients for their current products and enough from their providers to deliver).

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            • #46
              Originally posted by Mez' View Post
              Because you made it so in your head.
              I had my last laptop for 9 years, and it´s still in good condition. If I could replace the CPU, I might have kept it another 3-4 years.
              My MSI GE63VR died a few weeks ago. 95% probability short-circuit of some connector either displaced or fried. Even though I took care of my laptop (although I did move it wildly over 5 years, but hey it's made for being mobile after all), only one 10cm fall while being off and in bag (which shouldn't be that big of a deal).

              Currently writing from my previous laptop, which i fortunately kept, an ASUS n56VZ... Bought in 2012, and working like a charm, thanks to a (small) SSD I had installed in 2016, and being Linux powered. Maybe I had changed the battery too, or maybe not, don't remember.

              Anyways, so much for the "at best 4 years lifespan".
              - Pick hardware right on buy, targeting as high-end as you can afford, with replaceable battery, data peripheral and RAM being mandatory to your choice.
              - Favor if possible manufacturers that offer support/maintenance to pro, as they usually design laptops in ways to make them easily serviceable (like Dell).
              - Use Linux, and not Windows, to get best performance, security, customizability and maintenability (of course it requires some initial investment).
              - Learn how to set an automatic data AND system backup (I'll be honest, I didn't do the latter bit myself, it's on my todo list XD).
              This should already set you nicely for 10 years, easily, as far as "keeping hardware working" goes if you can avoid any accident.
              As for "keeping utility for hardware when performances keep flat but processing requirement increases"...
              - Before upgrading to newer version of professional software, at least if are the one to decide, consider whether new features are worth performance loss if any.
              - Teach yourself the basics and slightly less basics of system administration, including minor scripting and use of cron and similar tools, so you can defer intentive workload to periods where you are not yourself using computer extensively.
              - Learn software shortcuts, desktop customizations that help you streamline your standard day of work, so you can spare significant time on "just manipulating keyboard and mouse".
              Unless you work in a field where processing power must follow a "more than linear scale" (like you're designing computations for supercomputers), this should help you ease the perceived loss of efficiency of your computer when you ask more and more of it.

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              • #47
                Originally posted by Black_Fox View Post

                Just for the record, it's USB4. They couldn't even call it Thunderbolt as it wasn't certified at that time. Either way, that's why it's Intel only for now, AMD doesn't provide any USB4-supporting hardware yet.
                That's insightful. Thanks for pointing it out.

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                • #48
                  Originally posted by ruff View Post
                  Storage, graphics, lan, sound, usb - all those components originally were on ISA (then pci, then pci-e) bus. Storage was first to land on MB, then was ps/2 + usb, then was audio and finally IGD + LAN. It doesn't mean you cannot plug those components as discrete external modules of course, if you'd like to upgrade any of them.
                  Okay, but why would you integrate the display panel with the mainboard? That's what's weird about what you're talking about lol. Why would you solder the SMD components onto the chassis? That integration doesn't make sense either lol.

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                  • #49
                    Proprietary BIOS? Can't disable IME? I will walk away.

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