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The Framework Laptop Is Great For A Linux-Friendly, Upgradeable/Modular Laptop

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  • The Framework Laptop Is Great For A Linux-Friendly, Upgradeable/Modular Laptop

    Phoronix: The Framework Laptop Is Great For A Linux-Friendly, Upgradeable/Modular Laptop

    While many Linux users were excited years ago around EOMA68 and in part the possibility of an open, upgradeable laptop design, it has yet to ship and looking like it never will -- not to mention being very outdated specifications by today's standards. Entirely unrelated to that prior upgradeable hardware effort but continuing in similar goals is The Framework Laptop. The Framework Laptop is a thin, upgradeable notebook that is Linux-friendly and allows the user to easily upgrade their own components. I was testing The Framework Laptop for a while and from the hardware perspective is a very nice device and running well under Linux.

    https://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=30680

  • #2
    Typo:

    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    For privacy-minded folks, The Framework laptop features hardware toggle switches for the camera and built-in mcirophone.
    Let's upgrade the fan! Oh wait...

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    • #3
      Does anyone here know where to get a Linux compatible 17" laptop with Ryzen processor and a decent Radeon GPU (not just an integrated one)? Even Tuxedo only has Nvidia crap.

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      • #4
        I like what they've done with the Framework laptop. There are two things at this point that would hold me back from purchasing it though.

        1. AMD processor and graphics
        2. High res/non glare display

        I've fallen in love with My Lenovo Ideapad 16 Pro with it's Ryzen 5800H and 2560x1600(16:10) non glare display.

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        • #5
          The advantage of upgradable PCs and servers is not only that these can be upgraded, but their physical dimensions allow for extra hardware to be added to them. It allows for more options while it also allows for older components to stay and so to increase their value. This is obviously much less the case with an upgradeable laptop. And with a laptop that gets moved, carried, and occasionally tossed around, is there an added risk for a lot of connectors to fail.

          Not going to hold my breath for it, but still ... best of luck!

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          • #6
            I also have a Lenovo Ideapad 13 inch with the same resolution. it's something of a hidden gem. only around 500-600 euros and such a useful screen.

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            • #7
              I understand the utility of having self replaceable/upgradeable parts. But I simply accept that most laptops only have at best 4 year lifespans. I have 5 or 6 of them today, some coming up on 8 years old and they still work just fine. I think it is admirable what these guys are doing, but I also see lots of eBay listings for their niche parts long after the company is kaput.

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              • #8
                Hmmm, how did Manjaro manage to dominate others that much, it seems that on most tests it's 20-25% faster?

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                • #9
                  I've got mine. Put Arch on it and it's been flawless.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by edwaleni View Post
                    But I simply accept that most laptops only have at best 4 year lifespans.
                    I mean, the nice thing about this is that the lifetime of each component is not tied to the others. If you break the chassis, you get a chassis; if you want a new CPU, you swap the main board; if they iterate on the touchpad, you swap the touchpad.

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