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AMD Ryzen 9 5900HX / ASUS ROG Strix G15 AMD Advantage On Linux

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  • Paradigm Shifter
    replied
    Apologies for the post bump.

    I just ordered one of these, should arrive Saturday (I hope). Basically it came down to price; I set myself a limit for a new laptop and all reasonable nVidia options were about 25% more expensive (and came with slightly inferior CPUs, although the difference between a 5800H and a 5900HX won't be so great, I think) and, well, it's been years since I had an AMD GPU and I just want to see what their latest is like.

    If AMD ever get ROCm to support the 6800M, I might do some GPU-accelerated coding work, but I guess that will be wishful thinking. Sadly.

    It will, unfortunately, be running Windows (best I'll manage for Linux is WSL2 or a VM) exclusively because I've given up with dual-boot configurations and I need a couple of applications which require Windows... but we'll see how it goes. If I'm feeling particularly adventurous, I might try installing Xen or something and running everything as a VM with passthrough for the 6800M.

    There have apparently been a couple of firmware updates since this article (including one for the keyboard, although it only references fixing issues with the lighting) so I'd be curious if they snuck in fix for the odd keyboard behaviour in Linux as well. If I remember, I'll give it a test.

    Must remember to buy another power brick for it - I ain't lugging that monster 280W job to and from work every day!

    Leave a comment:


  • dragonn
    replied
    Originally posted by GreenReaper View Post

    That's not entirely true. You can install Hardware Enablement kernels (which I believe is a supported configuration, for desktop at least), or the mainline kernel compiled for Ubuntu (which probably isn't). These may not come out on the schedule you want, but at the end of the day, that's up to the manufacturers not getting support in.
    Updating the kernel for better hardware should be the DEFAULT AUTOMATIC option. Do you expect a complete new user coming from WIndows to know that he has to install "Hardware Enablement kernels"? He will install Ubuntu, see that half of his hardware isn't working at all, other half not like it shouldn't work and go straight back to Windows in 99% of the cases.

    Leave a comment:


  • Citan
    replied
    Originally posted by oxwivi View Post

    You can check Linus Tech Tips and other YouTube reviewers' videos on this, some of their videos open and show the internals. AFAIR, RAM and SSD was accessible just by opening the bottom panel, I don't remember about the battery.
    Thanks for the info and pointers

    Leave a comment:


  • oxwivi
    replied
    Originally posted by Citan View Post
    Could you please tell us how easy it is on that laptop to access those components, and whether they are easily removable / replacable (battery, RAM, SSD, HDD)?
    You can check Linus Tech Tips and other YouTube reviewers' videos on this, some of their videos open and show the internals. AFAIR, RAM and SSD was accessible just by opening the bottom panel, I don't remember about the battery.

    Leave a comment:


  • Citan
    replied
    Hi Michael thanks a bunch for that review.

    Since my current laptop just died, I have to consider buying a laptop soon enough.
    I do not want any kind of laptop with things like soldered RAM/SSD anymore though, or glued battery.

    Could you please tell us how easy it is on that laptop to access those components, and whether they are easily removable / replacable (battery, RAM, SSD, HDD)?

    Leave a comment:


  • oxwivi
    replied
    I've been saving up to get this laptop. Really happy it's working out nicely, even if 5.14. But speaking of AMD Advantage, how far along is their SmartShift thing to upstream?

    Leave a comment:


  • skeevy420
    replied
    Originally posted by [email protected] View Post

    I respectfully disagree. A piece of electrical tape is way cheaper than a new webcam. And if necessity arrives, it makes the webcam readily available, instead of buying one.

    I see your point about obsolescence, but lets be frank, unless you are broadcasting for a living, image quality will not improve to the point were the camera will became useless before the machine itself.
    On the privacy side, a piece of electrical tape doesn't work with the microphone and you have to trust the software that it really is off. Anyone who has used Android or Amazon devices knows you can't trust that part of the software.

    While I was thinking about Twitch streamers and bullshit like that, this is the age of remote video streaming where picture quality is becoming more and more important each day for business transactions and legal proceedings.

    Leave a comment:


  • skeevy420
    replied
    Originally posted by sandy8925 View Post

    Inconvenient. I get the privacy concerns, but inbuilt is way more convenient.
    To me it is no more inconvenient than having to carry around a BT or USB mouse because I don't like touch pads. If I already have an accessory bag, it's just another accessory for the bag.

    Leave a comment:


  • sandy8925
    replied
    Originally posted by fluke View Post

    Arch or Fedora depending the users requirements. I actively work on issues with most ASUS ROG style laptops https://asus-linux.org/
    How do you go about debugging that kind of problem and figuring out where the problem lies?

    Leave a comment:


  • sandy8925
    replied
    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

    IMHO, that's a good thing. No built-in camera that'll maybe perform bad, go obsolete in a few years, or to make a person paranoid and put tape over. If a person needs a web cam then they can buy one and power it from the USB port.
    Inconvenient. I get the privacy concerns, but inbuilt is way more convenient.

    Leave a comment:

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