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Intel On Their 11th Gen H35 Processors: "Fastest Single-Threaded Laptop Performance"

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  • #21
    Originally posted by [email protected] View Post

    You are citing programs that a Raspberry Pi can handle...
    A Raspberry Pi has the same performance as a low-end/mid-range CPU from 2009.
    I have compared my server machine to the Raspberry Pi, and the Pi isn't faster.

    You haven't witnessed it; Spigot forceUpgrade does 1000-2000 chunks per second on a 6700K. It could have been 9000 chunks per second, but it is single-threaded.
    The Pi would only do 200-400.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
      A Raspberry Pi has the same performance as a low-end/mid-range CPU from 2009.
      I have compared my server machine to the Raspberry Pi, and the Pi isn't faster.

      You haven't witnessed it; Spigot forceUpgrade does 1000-2000 chunks per second on a 6700K. It could have been 9000 chunks per second, but it is single-threaded.
      The Pi would only do 200-400.
      Either way, as grigi said, intel 11th gen is extremely limited by thermal throttling, which is not what you want. Single threaded applications almost always need sustained performance over time. This is where AMD shines and intel falls flat.

      The newest intel chips turbo boost to insane TDP for a very short duration, then they fall way back. The other downside to intel's design, is the heat and noise as a result of the insane boost TDP. In a laptop, you basically have to disable turbo boost unless you enjoy the irritating whine of a high speed fan. And in an ITX SFF desktop, you also have to disable turbo boost unless you like seeing your CPU hit 100 C and thermal throttle constantly. What intel has done with turbo boost is really a joke, about the only place it makes sense is in servers or tower workstations where you can fit a large and robust cooling solution. Then again, you mentioned a server use case, while this thread is about laptop chips, so it's an apples and oranges comparison.

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      • #23
        It probably seems insane to not have many high end processors without a dGPU in laptops because we're a whole forum of fairly technical people (some people here being absolute wizards of arcane crafts!), so our needs are not very typical. Most of us want to compile or compute lots of things, and while some of us play games, a lot of people who play games save it for their home built desktop anyway (or we're the type of nerd that plays only Minecraft, Runescape, and Tibia). However, the best I can figure is that OEMs just don't trust that there are enough of us that don't need the GPU but need lots of processor. There might also be something going on with pricing once you have a layout small enough for a laptop but need space to either have or not have a dGPU in the same model. In 2017 I bought two Surface Books for $1700 each. One had integrated graphics and the other was on a special and I got it with a dGPU at the same price. To me that suggests that a lot of the cost might be simply having a layout amenable to the gGPU might be a lot of the cost, so they don't want to risk losing marketshare over something that doesn't cost them much more on a layout that costs them a fair bit to make either way.

        Footnote: I don't recommend a Surface Book. Ever. It was the worst tech purchase I made in my life. Every desktop build has way more power and stays relevant for years longer with more flexibility and the Surface Book was very limited for its $1700 price tag in 2017 (only 8 GB RAM), but it was recommended to me via a friend that was working at Microsoft in a lab adjacent to the Surface team, and well... I went for it. I also don't trust trying Linux on it considering the Linux kernel is only just starting to support hotplugging GPUs, and the GPU is in the keyboard half of the Surface.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by phoronix_anon View Post
          I'll buy the first one I can get in a laptop without discrete graphics, Cezanne or Tiger Lake-H, doesn't matter to me. Apparently AMD forgot that non-gamers like bleeding edge performance too.
          You have to improve your google skills:

          https://www.reddit.com/r/AMDLaptops/..._the_tongfang/

          TongFang PF5NU1G, ODM device offered through several OEM, it is a 4800H, +90W battery, no dGPU, best dev machine out there

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          • #25
            Originally posted by Palu Macil View Post
            Footnote: I don't recommend a Surface Book. Ever. It was the worst tech purchase I made in my life. Every desktop build has way more power and stays relevant for years longer with more flexibility and the Surface Book was very limited for its $1700 price tag in 2017 (only 8 GB RAM), but it was recommended to me via a friend that was working at Microsoft in a lab adjacent to the Surface team, and well... I went for it. I also don't trust trying Linux on it considering the Linux kernel is only just starting to support hotplugging GPUs, and the GPU is in the keyboard half of the Surface.
            This is why I hate ultra-thin laptops. Back in the 1990's, laptops used desktop CPUs without too much trouble. They were thick enough to handle everything you want to stuff in them.

            Then came the stupid Macbook Air and sudenly everything had to be thin as a paper. Now every laptop thermalthrottles, had no RAM upgrade, keyboards have the feedback of a hard surface and are a bitch to do maintenance.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
              This is why I hate ultra-thin laptops. Back in the 1990's, laptops used desktop CPUs without too much trouble. They were thick enough to handle everything you want to stuff in them.

              Then came the stupid Macbook Air and sudenly everything had to be thin as a paper. Now every laptop thermalthrottles, had no RAM upgrade, keyboards have the feedback of a hard surface and are a bitch to do maintenance.
              AMEN, this 100%. "Thinness" is such a fantastically stupid goal to strive for in a laptop. Every functional aspect is compromised in the name of shaving millimeters off the chassis. Everything you just said @[email protected], the cooling systems suck with throttling and whiny fans, the RAM is soldered, the keyboards are garbage, it makes for a miserable experience, and for what? It's about as pleasant as using a 1U rackmount server as a desktop.
              Last edited by torsionbar28; 05 February 2021, 03:20 PM.

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              • #27
                Originally posted by squash View Post

                Lenovo briefly made a ThinkBook 13 inch model with 4800u available in the US at a reasonable price and it sold out within a few hours. For just over a grand you can buy a fairly good spec version from an online retailer but 16gb soldered ram is a big frowny face from me. At the price of the one I missed I would have grabbed it anyway...

                Rumor is Lenovo got exclusive access to the high end mobile parts in the US market and then just more or less forgot to make any...

                Asus is making mini pcs with those parts. I have a 4700u mini that I put 32gb in. It can run quite a while on a battery-based supply.

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                • #28
                  Intel is careful to include Wattage in the graph, but I wonder if they are truly hitting 5 Ghz at 35 watts?

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by [email protected] View Post

                    This is why I hate ultra-thin laptops. Back in the 1990's, laptops used desktop CPUs without too much trouble. They were thick enough to handle everything you want to stuff in them.

                    Then came the stupid Macbook Air and sudenly everything had to be thin as a paper. Now every laptop thermalthrottles, had no RAM upgrade, keyboards have the feedback of a hard surface and are a bitch to do maintenance.
                    And then the pandemic struck, so everybody got pinned to home office. I was looking for Ryzen 4000 laptop last summer, then I realized that I mostly spend my time @ home on my 35" UWHD monitor, with my mechanical keyboard. Now I have Ryzen 4650G desktop(no need for dGPU, as I am WEB dev), with plenty of RAM. Couldn't be happier, to show middle finger at those stupid laptop makers.

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by [email protected] View Post

                      This is why I hate ultra-thin laptops. Back in the 1990's, laptops used desktop CPUs without too much trouble. They were thick enough to handle everything you want to stuff in them.

                      Then came the stupid Macbook Air and sudenly everything had to be thin as a paper. Now every laptop thermalthrottles, had no RAM upgrade, keyboards have the feedback of a hard surface and are a bitch to do maintenance.
                      Your wish shall become true:
                      https://system76.com/laptops/serval

                      Psregarding cpu no dgpu -the Tuxedo and the Pangolin I have posted earlier have the Tongfang as base.

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