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A New Linux Kernel Framework To Help Ensure You Don't Burn Yourself On Hot Devices

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  • oiaohm
    replied
    Originally posted by rabcor View Post
    This sounds like a completely meaningless feature that will do absolutely nothing except waste CPU cycles, I don't really want it.

    Rather than a framework, it sounds like an ugly software hack to a problem (more like non-issue really) that should be handled at the hardware level.

    Problem is it need to come up to software level by some means. Lets say system is up on heat limit while user is attempting to use it. That is not a good time to start file indexing right, Also at times you will be wanting from the hardware level to be asking the OS can I shutdown these bits of hardware without crashing you. Remember powering off blocks of hardware can save a lot of heat.

    Leave a comment:


  • dlezcano
    replied
    Originally posted by rabcor View Post
    This sounds like a completely meaningless feature that will do absolutely nothing except waste CPU cycles, I don't really want it.

    Rather than a framework, it sounds like an ugly software hack to a problem (more like non-issue really) that should be handled at the hardware level.
    Ok ... How will you do that ?

    Leave a comment:


  • rabcor
    replied
    This sounds like a completely meaningless feature that will do absolutely nothing except waste CPU cycles, I don't really want it.

    Rather than a framework, it sounds like an ugly software hack to a problem (more like non-issue really) that should be handled at the hardware level.

    Leave a comment:


  • JustRob
    replied
    Man up replaced by weenie down.

    Leave a comment:


  • oiaohm
    replied
    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
    Is there a legal requirement on maximum temperature?

    So what? Is using a heater illegal now?
    What if the room temperature is 45°C? Does that make using a phone/computer illegal?

    Did we just break the law?
    The way FCC writes it makes sense for test but not so much for people reading it.

    Most humans in a 45 C room body temperature 36.5–37.5 there are exceptions we will ignore exceptions them for now will cover it at end.

    The 25C room at define atmospheric pressure is to replicate the heat-sink ability of a average human with air. Yes air is not as good at thermal conduction as a human so the room has to be slightly colder. If surface of device gets over 45C in that room and its area that not should be in contact with human its going to burn human.

    Having lived in areas that get 42C days you do see people having the problem that their phone works while they are holding it but as soon as they put it down it straight up emergency shutdown. Yes when person put down the device they have disconnected the heat-sink themselves so now the device overheats and stops. 45C room temp is the same the human in a 45C room normally will not be 45C.

    Yes phones and other devices have a lot more processing power in them than they have heat sink material for and are making up that lack of heat-sink material by taking advantage by using the human holding as heat-sink. The human heat-sink has it limits if you damage the human heat-sink does not bode well.

    Something like a big desktop computer where the out of case is room temp in the FCC test is going to pass on even a 50C day as long as the heatsinks inside keep up is safe. Reason thermal transfer to human touching case is going to be zero.

    Also something else to be aware this is why some laptops have horrible linux power performance because when they don't see a OS talk to their thermal management system they take the simple solution of ramping fans to 100 percent that massively reduces battery life. This is area we need standard for.

    There is also a small percentage of the human population with a little different body chemistry that on a 42C day will have a 41C core temp without any medical risk or being sick and I am one. Us with that different DNA cannot use a lot of devices on 42C days without some other cooling arrangement because our bodies does not function as a heat-sink for the device so this means we end up with a understanding that for devices human bit is not only controlling device but the heat-sink and us with the difference are a poor heat-sink so have to use some form of extra cooling on devices or only use devices in AC rooms on hot days.

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  • Zoll
    replied
    I'm looking at your Raspberry Pi4. Very hot temperatures were reported for the SBC and case. Sometimes, it is quite uncomfortable to touch unless you add in a heatsink and preferably some fan.

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  • Ironmask
    replied
    This seems redundant, nVidia GPUs already don't work on Linux.

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  • make_adobe_on_Linux!
    replied
    Originally posted by microcode View Post

    Specifically this is for the exterior of portuble computers intended for use on the lap or hands.
    Ya but it makes no sense considering how few sensors there are on the inside - much less outside - of computers!

    Leave a comment:


  • dlezcano
    replied
    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
    Is there a legal requirement on maximum temperature?

    So what? Is using a heater illegal now?
    What if the room temperature is 45°C? Does that make using a phone/computer illegal?

    Did we just break the law?
    When a phone is having a hotspot where the temperature is greater than 45°C, that is when the user feels the surface hot [1]

    45°C is the temperature where the skin tissues begin to be damaged [2]

    The higher the temperature, the faster the burn. But with a 45°C temperature, that happens on a long period, you can have the phone in contact with your skin without noticying it is hurting you.

    For this reason, the phone is not supposed to have hotspot greater than 45°C at least for a long duration.
    If the phone burns an user because it is above the skin temperature, the phone vendor will be considered responsible.

    This is required by the FCC and applies in the normal functioning temperature of 25°C.

    A heater is supposed to heat, not a phone.

    If the room is at 45°C and the phone is at that ambiant temperature, this one will not work correctly, it will quickly operate an emergency shutdown if it does not explode before, as stated by this documentation [3].

    I'm not English native, and perhaps, "legal" is not an adequate word.

    It is the same as the SAR where the FCC requires 1,6 W/kg limit for 1g of tissue [4]

    [1] https://nanoheat.stanford.edu/sites/...%20Article.pdf
    [2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4188373/
    [3] https://support.google.com/pixelphon.../7486047?hl=en
    [4] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Specific_absorption_rate

    Leave a comment:


  • microcode
    replied
    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
    Is there a legal requirement on maximum temperature?

    So what? Is using a heater illegal now?
    What if the room temperature is 45°C? Does that make using a phone/computer illegal?

    Did we just break the law?
    Specifically this is for the exterior of portuble computers intended for use on the lap or hands.

    Leave a comment:

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