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Independent Developers Tackling Snapdragon 630/660 SoC Support For The Upstream Linux Kernel

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  • ed31337
    replied
    Originally posted by Spam View Post
    Stable interface is what we have in Windows Driver Model, where a driver will work for a very very long time.
    Uh huh... Tell that to my CanoScan LiDE 30 flat bed scanner. Hasn't worked in Windows since Windows XP. But works great, right out of the box, on any recent Ubuntu Linux. Took a little downloading to get it to work on my Raspberry Pi 4, but still, it really works well. Meanwhile, Windows doesn't work at all.

    Leave a comment:


  • S.Pam
    replied
    Originally posted by konradybcio View Post

    Well, both of your points are wrong.


    1. They *do* provide source, but it's of so bad quality that it's not going to be accepted upstream. Though this is changing with Google's GKI concept (as in the drivers are likely going to be distributed as proprietary kernel modules)..

    2. Linux _does_ have a stable-ish ABI (yeah, it could be better though..), but downstream modifications break and contaminate it by adding things on top of it (just diff any Qualcomm kernel against corresponding torvalds version...) making it essentially impossible to plug-and-play older drivers. Also, until this year most downstream kernels were based on ancient Linux releases (most SoC vendors jumped to the next LTS version every flagship SoC release, Qualcomm hit 4.19 this year)
    Right, that's why we all can run our old phones with new OS on them?

    Stable interface is what we have in Windows Driver Model, where a driver will work for a very very long time. This is severely lacking. Have you tried to load a kernel module from an older kernel? How often does that work?

    Leave a comment:


  • konradybcio
    replied
    Originally posted by Spam View Post
    This whole issue is because of two things
    1. The vendor didn't open source the drivers or didn't provide updates
    2. Linux doesn't load drivers/mods made for earlier kernels. This is a big issue in Linux... If they had a stable interface for drivers we could have had much better support for older stuffy on newer kernels.
    Well, both of your points are wrong.


    1. They *do* provide source, but it's of so bad quality that it's not going to be accepted upstream. Though this is changing with Google's GKI concept (as in the drivers are likely going to be distributed as proprietary kernel modules)..

    2. Linux _does_ have a stable-ish ABI (yeah, it could be better though..), but downstream modifications break and contaminate it by adding things on top of it (just diff any Qualcomm kernel against corresponding torvalds version...) making it essentially impossible to plug-and-play older drivers. Also, until this year most downstream kernels were based on ancient Linux releases (most SoC vendors jumped to the next LTS version every flagship SoC release, Qualcomm hit 4.19 this year)

    Leave a comment:


  • S.Pam
    replied
    This whole issue is because of two things
    1. The vendor didn't open source the drivers or didn't provide updates
    2. Linux doesn't load drivers/mods made for earlier kernels. This is a big issue in Linux... If they had a stable interface for drivers we could have had much better support for older stuffy on newer kernels.

    Leave a comment:


  • Deetwenty
    replied
    Originally posted by konradybcio View Post

    This really is an issue. With enough upstream support, you could buy a few-years-old "broken" phone and turn it into a low-power-consumption server equipped with its own UPS (well, the battery), a more than capable GPU, video encoder/decoder hardware, Wi-Fi, BT, a cellular modem(!) and all that jazz. Sadly, most of the SoCs are unsupported. But hopefully that'll change.
    Not only that my experience from having a Jolla with sailfish for some times (before I cracked the screen) tells me that native Linux apps are a lot more powerful than many Android apps, so long as I kept to native apps and didn't browse to much it was a reasonable capable daily driver. So I think a lot of those older phones with something like plasma mobile (or the equivalent GTK project) will still be pretty capable as daily drivers.

    Leave a comment:


  • konradybcio
    replied
    Originally posted by rene View Post
    isn't it ironic how the big silicon companies do a sh1t for linux support and it's up to volunteers to clean the mess up, reverse engineer missing bits and bring it upstream?
    This really is an issue. With enough upstream support, you could buy a few-years-old "broken" phone and turn it into a low-power-consumption server equipped with its own UPS (well, the battery), a more than capable GPU, video encoder/decoder hardware, Wi-Fi, BT, a cellular modem(!) and all that jazz. Sadly, most of the SoCs are unsupported. But hopefully that'll change.

    Leave a comment:


  • Haxk20
    replied
    Originally posted by rene View Post
    isn't it ironic how the big silicon companies do a sh1t for linux support and it's up to volunteers to clean the mess up, reverse engineer missing bits and bring it upstream?
    It is indeed sad. We dont even access to documentation that linaro gets. So its seriously reverse enginnering

    Leave a comment:


  • rene
    replied
    isn't it ironic how the big silicon companies do a sh1t for linux support and it's up to volunteers to clean the mess up, reverse engineer missing bits and bring it upstream?

    Leave a comment:


  • bemerk
    replied
    For this particular soc, but in general for current Qualcomm socs you see linaro, Google, Qualcomm and other companies posting patches.
    Too bad that Samsung isn't working harder on Exynos and Hisilicon could also do more for Kirin.
    For these the community isn't there either in visible quantities.
    Last edited by bemerk; 27 September 2020, 01:41 PM.

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  • Haxk20
    replied
    Originally posted by bemerk View Post
    Nice work by all these people and companies involved.
    Too bad that there is close to no work done on other SoCs than Qualcomms Snapdragon.
    I guess that limits the possible mobile devices one can buy safely in the future
    No companies were involved.
    It is only the community developers.

    Leave a comment:

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