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Many Linux Developers Are Ecstatic Over Fedora On Lenovo Systems

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  • Many Linux Developers Are Ecstatic Over Fedora On Lenovo Systems

    Phoronix: Many Linux Developers Are Ecstatic Over Fedora On Lenovo Systems

    As noted this weekend, Lenovo has begun offering Fedora pre-loaded on their systems beginning with the ThinkPad X1 Carbon Gen 8 laptop. Red Hat's Christian Schaller who serves as the senior manager for desktop chimed in with some additional thoughts and details on this achievement...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...inux-On-Lenovo

  • #2
    This is indeed cool. If anything it will help ensure that the hardware is more "standard" for all FOSS platforms *and* Windows forward compatibility.

    The days of weird ad-hoc power management and hotkey drivers could be over. Perhaps even the BIOS/EFI might be implemented against standards too!

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    • #3
      Linux preinstalled sounds amazing until you realize that there are some crazy unresolved issues with it:
      • Fedora features new releases each nine months and AFAIK there's no graphical way to seamlessly upgrade Fedora N to N+1 or N+2. Running dnf in console is not what people expect from an OS in 2020.
      • GRUB/kernel/Xorg/GDM/Gnome updates can make system unbootable/unusable (it's relatively rare but it happens) - there's no way to boot into some sort of safe environment and fix/revert the recent changes to fix your system. Recovery mode exists but it boots you into the text console which is alien to absolute most people out there. Or, in case GRUB is broken, there's no way to recover at all except booting from recovery media.
      • These laptops with come with secure UEFI boot mode on which means the user will not be able to use applications like VirtualBox or VMWare Workstation unless the user disables secure boot which is not really good.
      • In other OSes GUI sees less drastic changes less often and in Linux, specially in Gnome, it may make people feel uncomfortable.
      • And the biggest of the issues is that there's a lot more software and games for Windows than for Linux.
      It's all IMO and you may disagree with that but everything that I've written is based on my experience of using Linux exclusively for more than two decades.
      Last edited by birdie; 08-31-2020, 05:27 PM.

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      • #4
        What else would you be using for development anyway? Thinkpad T is still the go-to solution for anything serious about mobile and Fedora is the best distro for development. I only sidestep Fedora because Fedora sidesteps KDE.

        birdie If you're intimidated by the CLI after 20 years, clearly Linux is not for you. Save yourself some pain (too late, I know) and move on.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by birdie View Post
          Linux preinstalled sounds amazing until you realize that there are some crazy unresolved issues with it:
          • Fedora features new releases each nine months and AFAIK there's no graphical way to seamlessly upgrade Fedora N to N+1 or N+2. Running dnf in console is not what people expect from an OS in 2020.
          • GRUB/kernel/Xorg/GDM/Gnome updates can make system unbootable/unusable (it's relatively rare but it happens) - there's no way to boot into some sort of safe environment and fix/revert the recent changes to fix your system. Recovery mode exists but it boots you into the text console which is alien to absolute most people out there. Or, in case GRUB is broken, there's no way to recover at all except booting from recovery media.
          • These laptops with come with secure UEFI boot mode on which means the user will not be able to use applications like VirtualBox or VMWare Workstation unless the user disables secure boot which is not really good.
          • In other OSes GUI sees less drastic changes less often and in Linux, specially in Gnome, it may make people feel uncomfortable.
          • And the biggest of the issues is that there's a lot more software and games for Windows than for Linux.
          It's all IMO and you may disagree with that but everything that I've written is based on my experience of using Linux exclusively for more than two decades.
          Ehh, you do know you can go to the (GNOME) Software, go to "updates" and if there is a new version of Fedora, there will be a big banner proclaiming there is a new version of Fedora with a big button for you to click on to upgrade the system. Nothing hard about that.
          People buying a Linux laptop will probably be aware they'll run Linux software. I can now basically run all my games I have, a lot of which I got when I was still on Windows.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by birdie View Post
            Linux preinstalled sounds amazing until you realize that there are some crazy unresolved issues with it:[LIST][*]Fedora features new releases each nine months and AFAIK there's no graphical way to seamlessly upgrade Fedora N to N+1 or N+2. Running dnf in console is not what people expect from an OS in 2020.
            It's every 6 months, and you can upgrade between releases using Gnome software center (graphically) or with dnf (CLI).

            These laptops are intended for existing users of Linux on the desktop, so I'm not sure why the arguments you are making (regardless of their merit) would affect people who are already planning on running Linux.

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            • #7
              Fedora features new releases each nine months and AFAIK there's no graphical way to seamlessly upgrade Fedora N to N+1 or N+2. Running dnf in console is not what people expect from an OS in 2020.
              Gnome software store configured by fedora will pick up the updates as it does in debian, As for using DNF, Well microsoft are in the process of rolling out there own package manager, winget, So i guess people are asking for it.

              GRUB/kernel/Xorg/GDM/Gnome updates can make system unbootable/unusable (it's relatively rare but it happens) - there's no way to boot into some sort of safe environment and fix/revert the recent changes to fix your system. Recovery mode exists but it boots you into the text console which is alien to absolute most people out there. Or, in case GRUB is broken, there's no way to recover at all except booting from recovery media.
              Same can be said for windows, Recovery images in win10 are not guaranteed to work and the culture in windows land is to just do a clean install anyway.

              These laptops with come with secure UEFI boot mode on which means the user will not be able to use applications like VirtualBox or VMWare Workstation unless the user disables secure boot which is not really good.
              Secure boot is a pain for the linux tinkerer, Though im sure fedora have a solution for VM's.

              In other OSes GUI sees less drastic changes less often and in Linux, specially in Gnome, it may make people feel uncomfortable.
              There's a lot less drastic GUI changes in gnome compared to osx and windows. osx likes to upset people with every release. How old is Gnome3?

              And the biggest of the issues is that there's a lot more software and games for Windows than for Linux.
              Not exactly the biggest issue since all those windows games are probably playable through wine (steam) with proton. Though i'll throw a bone for yer and agree with this when it comes to anti-cheat online games. Outside of games i think the only thing missing here is msoffice and the adobe suite.

              It will be interesting to see how lenovo and fedora get on with this project, And i sure hope lenovo stick it out for the long haul, If they can convince people linux doesnt have to be hard it's a win win for the penguin.
              Last edited by SilverFox; 08-31-2020, 06:10 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by birdie View Post
                Linux preinstalled sounds amazing until you realize that there are some crazy unresolved issues with it:
                • Fedora features new releases each nine months and AFAIK there's no graphical way to seamlessly upgrade Fedora N to N+1 or N+2. Running dnf in console is not what people expect from an OS in 2020.
                  ...
                It's all IMO and you may disagree with that but everything that I've written is based on my experience of using Linux exclusively for more than two decades.
                I could go point by point but even the first one here is factually incorrect.

                Fedora lifecycle is typically more like 13 months, given that each release is supported for N+1 + 1 month and every release is usually about six months apart and GNOME Software has supported a graphical method of upgrading for a very long time and prompts you pro-actively when a new release is available. It all automatic. If you are a current user of Fedora and you have all this experience with Linux, I am curious why you missed this.

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                • #9
                  *derailed*

                  It is schizophrenic using Linux over 20years but proclaiming win is better. Nice bait troll.

                  Lets geht back on track.
                  Lenovo+Linux great Option. Im hoping this is just the beginning. Im really looking forward to the improvments

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                  • #10
                    A secure, fast, free OS and bloated, slow, insecure, spying crap. What should I choose?

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