Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

TUXEDO Introduces New Linux Laptop With Ryzen 7 4800H / Ryzen 5 4600H

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • cb88
    replied
    Originally posted by darkdragon-001 View Post

    Probably because they are both manufactured by Clevo
    They are both manufactured by TongFang, Clevo has nothing to do with them.

    Leave a comment:


  • aksdb
    replied
    Originally posted by kravemir View Post

    Goland and IDEA at the same time? It's interesting mix. Is it for the same stack / product? Or is it for different projects? I'm actually using golang for hobby projects, and one private work in progress,... And, if it's not hobby projects of yours, then what was the reason to go with golang instead of JVM / nodejs based backend, as these are still trending and preferred.
    Because I like my system resources and sanity. JVM sucks memory and needs an ugly to manage warmup time. NodeJS is ... well JS. I hate JS. (Also benchmarks don't exactly favor NodeJS in comparison to Go or even a well warmed JVM.)
    Aside from that Go is just so much more pleasant to work with (the simplicity of the language, the provided tooling and the extensive stdlib).

    So yes, it's all in one project. Different services, though.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by aksdb View Post

    It isn't. I got 32GB and I still manage to run out of memory when I have 2 IntelliJ IDEA, 2 Goland, 2 Webstorm, 1 Chrome, 2 Elasticsearch, 1 MongoDB, 2 NodeJS services, 1 Java service and so on and so on. Basically if I have to debug across multiple (locally running) services of our service landscape, it can get quite tough. (Browser, Slack and the IDEs are the main sink for RAM, though ... the services itself are quite "ok").
    Goland and IDEA at the same time? It's interesting mix. Is it for the same stack / product? Or is it for different projects? I'm actually using golang for hobby projects, and one private work in progress,... And, if it's not hobby projects of yours, then what was the reason to go with golang instead of JVM / nodejs based backend, as these are still trending and preferred.

    Leave a comment:


  • aksdb
    replied
    Originally posted by kravemir View Post

    Yep. I've got currently 48GB RAM, and I regularly reach 20GB of usage with whole environment opened (lots of Java and nodejs based apps, and browsers). It's an overkill for now, but I don't think even 32GB is future proof.
    It isn't. I got 32GB and I still manage to run out of memory when I have 2 IntelliJ IDEA, 2 Goland, 2 Webstorm, 1 Chrome, 2 Elasticsearch, 1 MongoDB, 2 NodeJS services, 1 Java service and so on and so on. Basically if I have to debug across multiple (locally running) services of our service landscape, it can get quite tough. (Browser, Slack and the IDEs are the main sink for RAM, though ... the services itself are quite "ok").

    Leave a comment:


  • edwaleni
    replied
    Originally posted by kravemir View Post

    Not an excuse,... it's still a faster, than what I have currently, but it doesn't matter much now, for me there's a specific reason, which would make me to buy a new laptop: AMD CPU, not embedded with Nvidia discrete GPU, and USB4 support for docking into eGPU setup.

    And, I hope manufacturers care to listen, what customers want, ... or I'll go with Intel and Thunderbolt, if there will be a need to buy a new one (performance reasons, or maybe failure of current one,...). AMD should have pushed for Thunderbolt-like interface long time ago,...
    Maybe this will help.

    Lenovo says they will be releasing the Intel Tiger Lake CPU with full Thunderbolt 4 support in November 2020. However, not all models may not be available in all markets.

    Since USB4 requires TB4, i don't know if all of the supporting drivers are mature just yet, but it is getting closer to release.

    As for non-Intel models, the Intel 8000 series TB4 controllers are due out at the same time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Slartifartblast
    replied
    Originally posted by kravemir View Post

    I was getting my hopes up, and then saw, it has got soldered RAM. However, I hope it gets better with options over the year.
    Sadly that seems to be the norm now and you have to pay serious $$$$ to get a laptop with dual SODIMM slots or choose very wisely.

    Leave a comment:


  • nkalkhof
    replied
    Half the battery capacity of the 15" model, only one M2 slot and no DP(-MST). Thanks but no thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • novhack
    replied
    I really love the design and hardware of Pulse series laptops. TongFang really stepped-up their game. Unfortunately my old Ivy Bridge based ultrabook still works relatively fine so I have no need to buy a new one. But once that day comes I will totally consider Tuxedo or Slimbook (or System76 but those guys are mostly out of my price range now).

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by sandy8925 View Post

    Yeah, soldered RAM is annoying if you don't get the desired amount at the beginning. I bought a laptop with 8 GB of soldered RAM, now I wish I had 16 GB.
    Yep. I've got currently 48GB RAM, and I regularly reach 20GB of usage with whole environment opened (lots of Java and nodejs based apps, and browsers). It's an overkill for now, but I don't think even 32GB is future proof.

    Leave a comment:


  • sarmad
    replied
    Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

    Again with this? For the gazillionth time: TUXEDO uses TongFang designs, NOT Clevo.
    How does TongFang compare to Clevo in terms of build quality? I have a System76 Darter Pro, which is a Clevo, but I don't like the build quality.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X