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Linux 5.8 Will Finally Be Able To Control ThinkPad Laptops With Dual Fans

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  • Linux 5.8 Will Finally Be Able To Control ThinkPad Laptops With Dual Fans

    Phoronix: Linux 5.8 Will Finally Be Able To Control ThinkPad Laptops With Dual Fans

    Long overdue but for Lenovo ThinkPad laptops sporting two fans, the Linux 5.8 kernel will see the ability to control both fans...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...an-Control-5.8

  • #2
    This should hopefully make the experience smooth for people buying the new Lenovo Ideapad S540 13-ARE with the new 8c/16t+8CU Renoir APU from AMD. Sweet!

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    • #3
      The last thing I want in a laptop is fans and mechanical parts. Imagine when Apple is launching their new ARM-based Macbook with the upcoming Apple A14 processor which will also be used in the upcoming iPhone 12. The IPC is way ahead that of any x86 processor, so even at lower frequencies it can outperform then while using less energy, emitting less heat. You will be able to have a silent laptop with great battery time and performance.

      Intel and AMD are so far behind, all their cores are identical. The ARM-based processors can pair weaker cores with stronger cores. Even when they eventually catch up with mixed-core functionality they're still stuck with the shitty ass x86 architecture that has terrible and is full of hacks and suffers from lots of vulnerabilities. Mean while RISC-V and ARMv8 (AArch64, ARM64) are properly designed ISAs and don't even need SMT because they don't suffer from those shortcomings.

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      • #4
        and if you're a mac user that's great!
        they are indeed impressive SoC's.

        i'd argue that Renoir goes a good way to bring this back, and a future 7nm(euv) product using Zen3 and RDNA2 will go even further.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by uid313 View Post
          The last thing I want in a laptop is fans and mechanical parts. Imagine when Apple is launching their new ARM-based Macbook with the upcoming Apple A14 processor which will also be used in the upcoming iPhone 12. The IPC is way ahead that of any x86 processor, so even at lower frequencies it can outperform then while using less energy, emitting less heat. You will be able to have a silent laptop with great battery time and performance.

          Intel and AMD are so far behind, all their cores are identical. The ARM-based processors can pair weaker cores with stronger cores. Even when they eventually catch up with mixed-core functionality they're still stuck with the shitty ass x86 architecture that has terrible and is full of hacks and suffers from lots of vulnerabilities. Mean while RISC-V and ARMv8 (AArch64, ARM64) are properly designed ISAs and don't even need SMT because they don't suffer from those shortcomings.
          We don't have an A14 vs Tiger Lake vs Zen3 comparison, so everything you say is just speculation on your part.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by uid313 View Post
            The last thing I want in a laptop is fans and mechanical parts. Imagine when Apple is launching their new ARM-based Macbook with the upcoming Apple A14 processor which will also be used in the upcoming iPhone 12. The IPC is way ahead that of any x86 processor, so even at lower frequencies it can outperform then while using less energy, emitting less heat. You will be able to have a silent laptop with great battery time and performance.

            Intel and AMD are so far behind, all their cores are identical. The ARM-based processors can pair weaker cores with stronger cores. Even when they eventually catch up with mixed-core functionality they're still stuck with the shitty ass x86 architecture that has terrible and is full of hacks and suffers from lots of vulnerabilities. Mean while RISC-V and ARMv8 (AArch64, ARM64) are properly designed ISAs and don't even need SMT because they don't suffer from those shortcomings.
            I kind of miss debianxfce. Kind of.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by uid313 View Post
              Imagine when Apple is launching their new ARM-based .
              And I look forward to when they adhere to proper standards so we can install actual operating systems on them

              Honestly, the day that I don't need a platform specific image per ARM device I have is a great breakthrough. Imagine if Intel did that; you would need a specific .iso for every single model of Thinkpad available XD.

              Its almost like ARM devices need to catch up with the late 80's and get a BIOS

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Jedibeeftrix View Post
                and if you're a mac user that's great!
                they are indeed impressive SoC's.

                i'd argue that Renoir goes a good way to bring this back, and a future 7nm(euv) product using Zen3 and RDNA2 will go even further.
                I am not a Mac user, but would kind of like one of those new new upcoming ARM-based Macbooks to run Linux on.
                Zen 3 can't do anything, sure the RDNA2 can be great and the graphics capabilities may turn out to be impressive, and while Zen 3 will be better than Zen 2 it is still based on the inferior x86 architecture, so while it can be less worse than before, its still stuck with all that legacy baggage, outdated design and poor design decisions of the x86 ISA.

                Originally posted by kpedersen View Post

                And I look forward to when they adhere to proper standards so we can install actual operating systems on them

                Honestly, the day that I don't need a platform specific image per ARM device I have is a great breakthrough. Imagine if Intel did that; you would need a specific .iso for every single model of Thinkpad available XD.

                Its almost like ARM devices need to catch up with the late 80's and get a BIOS
                Well, modern x86 don't even use BIOS anymore, they use UEFI. There is some UEFI stuff going on in the ARM world too, but but the biggest manufacturer is Qualcomm and they don't want any standard because they want short product life cycles for ARM-based products so they can sell new SoCS.

                The lack of standardized init for ARM is quite unfortunate as the architecture is very well designed and hence have great capability for good performance.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                  The lack of standardized init for ARM is quite unfortunate as the architecture is very well designed and hence have great capability for good performance.
                  x86 is a far better designed and extensible architecture and your hopes will remain dreams buddy.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Weasel View Post
                    x86 is a far better designed and extensible architecture and your hopes will remain dreams buddy.
                    No it is not, x86 was designed as CISC architecture, then came RISC which was deemed superior. So Intel implements modern x86 microprocessors in a way that is more like a RISC architecture. Later DEC Alpha, ARM, SPARC, POWER and MIPS were released which were considered superior but Intel could still stay competitive due having greater fabrication technology that was years ahead and due to enormous resources.

                    But all of these architectures are rather ineffective and does not scale well, and to be able to perform they had to resort to implementing SMT because the architecture was ineffective.

                    Then RISC-V was designed which was very clean and designed by brilliant people with lots of experience, it is much more effective and have a much higher instruction per clock cycle. Then ARM designed ARMv8 which while it carries the ARM name it has little to do with the old ARMv7, its actually a clean new architecture, unlike x86-64 which was just 64-bit extensions shoehorned onto the x86 architecture.

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