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Google Makes It Easier To Flash Android Open-Source Project On Phones

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  • Google Makes It Easier To Flash Android Open-Source Project On Phones

    Phoronix: Google Makes It Easier To Flash Android Open-Source Project On Phones

    Flashing the Android Open-Source Project (AOSP) onto devices is now a lot easier thanks to the Android Flash Tool...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...lash-Tool-AOSP

  • #2
    It was already used by Google for internal beta tests, they just decided to make it public.

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    • #3
      what about warranty?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by loganj View Post
        what about warranty?
        I would think Google might cover their own devices but either asking Google or looking for that info with the tool (as in info located along with or near the tool) would be advisable.

        If it works on non-Google devices then I would highly doubt it. It looks like the bootloader must be unlocked which then should void the warranty in most to all cases as far as I know.
        Last edited by ix900; 01-28-2020, 02:47 PM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ix900 View Post
          I would think Google might cover their own devices
          Highly doubtful. AOSP is to Android what CentOS is to RHEL. Quite frankly I'm not sure why any consumer would want to run AOSP. There are better packaged alternatives out there (LineageOS, /e/, etc) that offer added value.

          The only reason Google is releasing this Flash Tool to the public, is to get all the free telemetry data. Android (and AOSP) send a sh!tload of data back to the Google mothership, it's spyware by any definition. If you install AOSP, you're essentially doing unpaid beta testing for them. Not an attractive proposition in my book.
          Last edited by torsionbar28; 01-28-2020, 04:15 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
            Highly doubtful. AOSP is to Android what CentOS is to RHEL. Quite frankly I'm not sure why any consumer would want to run AOSP. There are better packaged alternatives out there (LineageOS, /e/, etc) that offer added value.

            The only reason Google is releasing this Flash Tool to the public, is to get all the free telemetry data. Android (and AOSP) send a sh!tload of data back to the Google mothership, it's spyware by any definition. If you install AOSP, you're essentially doing unpaid beta testing for them. Not an attractive proposition in my book.
            I don't think the AOSP / CentOS analogy holds. Maybe CyanogenOS and CyanogenMod?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
              Android (and AOSP) send a sh!tload of data back to the Google mothership, it's spyware by any definition. If you install AOSP, you're essentially doing unpaid beta testing for them.
              Actually, no. Most of the ping back are done by the Google Play Services blob - the thing which constitutes the main difference between the official Google's Android experience, and AOSP.
              Flashing AOSP lack that blob, so a lot less telmetry is going on.

              The problem *then* is that a big amount of apps are absolutely addicted to API provided by Google Play Services and won't work on a bare-bone opensource install.
              - You need to either fetch and install to orignal blob by Google (with some tool like opengapps) and thus get the tracking back
              - Or you need to install some alternative that provides the same com.google.android.gms API, like microG.

              That's one of the extra added value of /e/ : they do pack microG to make more app runable, without inviting the Google Octopus to the feast.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
                Highly doubtful. AOSP is to Android what CentOS is to RHEL.
                Supposedly, unlocked bootloader doesn't necessarily void the warranty of a Google phone which means other ROMS can possibly be installed including AOSP without voiding warranty. The only way to know for sure though is to ask Google. They're obviously the ones releasing this tool too so makes sense that they will either accept it or would know besides random people on the internet debating it lol.

                Installation of AOSP and voiding phone's warranty are also not reflective on your or my own opinions of AOSP so I will make no comment on that.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by loganj View Post
                  what about warranty?
                  flashing a different firmware requires unlocking bootloader, and either that or flashing non-stock firmware voids your warranty.

                  Also for Google devices.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
                    Android (and AOSP) send a sh!tload of data back to the Google mothership, it's spyware by any definition.
                    Ummm... how so. AOSP is all opensource stuff that makes up Android core and telemetry apps are Gapps closed source stuff added on top in normal firmwares.

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