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ASUS TUF Laptops With Ryzen Are Now Patched To Stop Overheating On Linux

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  • #31
    Originally posted by blackshard View Post

    Because, also for gaming, you can use them as workstations?

    They have:

    - full hd IPS panels
    - 35W/45W CPUs (not the hindered -U models with power limit of 15 watts)
    - Discrete video chips with enough power
    - Plenty of memory

    Just some use cases that pops in mind are architects, 3D rendering, ...
    Of course desktops are better in terms of price/performance, but they can't be moved easily
    professional users cannot really use gaming systems for CAD/CAM. Not for serious work at least °°
    There exist lineups of proper workstation laptops.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by eggbert View Post

      True, but the same could be said for these "workstation" use cases. Desktops are better suited for these uses as well. Anyone serious about 3D rendering is going to be doing it on the proper hardware... The only advantage these laptops offer is mobility, but even this is not that great as these "gaming" laptops weigh a ton, have giant power bricks, and often have crappy TN panels rather than sharper, more accurate, IPS screens. Not to mention they are marketed as "gaming" laptops and even include the stupid RGB lighting to boot. But I guess to each their own.
      Ok, but as you see this ASUS TUF machines have full-hd IPS panels, weight 2.5 kg (not a TON) and can be used in mobility to do 3D modelling etc... so you may chose a desktop to do 3D (or whatever you need it for) for better price/performance ratio, but if you *need* mobility these notebooks are a suitable choice and desktop is not.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by aht0 View Post
        professional users cannot really use gaming systems for CAD/CAM. Not for serious work at least °°
        There exist lineups of proper workstation laptops.
        Of course, as much as a professional can't use a soho notebook, or professionals 3D makers can't use 3D gaming video cards in their setup for some obscure reasons, yet they have to pay three or four times the same amount of money for the very same piece of hardware.

        Professionals is a border-line word to often say everything and nothing, of course you need to evaluate what you exactly need for your work.

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        • #34
          I had this throttling issue in Asus laptops since 2008. Whether it's windows or Linux , it always throttled and set at 1192 MHz speed.

          Had to install custom overclocking software such as Throttle Stop to keep it running at processors advertised speed.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by paupav View Post

            I have read on reddit that all Ryzen laptops have problems on linux. So I don't think its ASUS specific. Lenovo and others have same problems.
            Mine's working fine. Lenovo Flex 14, AMD Ryzen 7 2700U with Radeon Vega Mobile Gfx. Can't complain

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            • #36
              My new HP 14-dk0028wm Ryzen 3 3200u did this to me yesterday. Just rebooted and came up saying it had overheated. I rebooted again, and noticed the fans were no where near as loud as in Windows. Bios setting has fans enabled all the time, but don't seem to spin up as fast as they do under windows.

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              • #37
                Sorry for being such a noob, but could anyone point me towards any guide of sorts about how to install these patches? I'm somewhat of a linux noob and would love to learn how to apply them so my laptop can run properly.

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                • #38
                  Guys, I need to tell you a success story about one of those Laptop models and Linux.

                  Originally I bought the ASUS TUF FX505DY without any OS as I already have plenty of rarely used Windows 10 product keys and I wanted to transfer one of them from my old laptop with a dead screen. I also thought about dual boot until Linux support would be in good shape.

                  I downloaded the latest Win10 ISO image, tried a few USB sticks as it was not instantly working with the first and then I reached the Win10 setup screen. There the installer complained about a missing media/usb/block device driver (maybe the builtin NVMe SSD, but I did put in an additional SATA SSD) and I became stuck. On the Asus driver download web page for the model I couldn't find any related Win10 driver for this.

                  So actually I gave up on Windows 10 and installed Ubuntu 18.04.4, Linux kernel 5.3 without any hassle. The iGPU graphics was working without any problems and also the nvidia driver from the Ubuntu repos got installed flawlessly.

                  The only thing what gave me some headache was switching to the dGPU. I even tried the latest nvidia installer (what hack of install) but it seems that nvidia and prime is a topic for Linux graphics experts (Does nvidia still not do Wayland?). At the end I got the configuration for the discrete card working in X but still no switching. When I manage to get it work I may post some tips here.

                  I also left some space on disk to give Windows 10 a last chance using some older version (which you stupidly can't download anymore as soon the newer one ist out) but for me it's clear that Linux is now far better when you have to install a PC from scratch even there are still rough edges with the latest hardware and this incredible ignorance on the side of the oem laptop makers (yes, Lenovo, I mean you).

                  Cheers, M.
                  Last edited by mick3; 03-22-2020, 01:34 PM.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by mick3 View Post
                    I downloaded the latest Win10 ISO image, tried a few USB sticks as it was not instantly working with the first and then I reached the Win10 setup screen. There the installer complained about a missing media/usb/block device driver (maybe the builtin NVMe SSD, but I did put in an additional SATA SSD) and I became stuck. On the Asus driver download web page for the model I couldn't find any related Win10 driver for this.
                    Probably this problem:
                    https://www.amd.com/en/support/kb/faq/pa-260

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Zan Lynx View Post
                      Thanks, I will try this out. But I really want to know why Microsoft couldn't incorporate this into most recent ISO image download as this is essential for a Windows 10 installation on a Ryzen PC!? Some useful error message would also been helpful.

                      I must say Ubuntu (or better the Linux kernel developers) did their homework, Microsoft didn't. So much for the better windows hardware support...
                      Last edited by mick3; 03-22-2020, 05:26 PM.

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