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Automotive Grade Linux Has Large Presence At CES 2020

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  • Automotive Grade Linux Has Large Presence At CES 2020

    Phoronix: Automotive Grade Linux Has Large Presence At CES 2020

    At the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas there isn't too often "pure" Linux being showcased aside from the likes of Ubuntu occasionally running on demo machines or servers, the year Canonical was there with Ubuntu TV, and a number of other select mostly small instances where Linux is prominently featured. That's in part why I stopped regularly attending CES (as well as budgetary constraints due to ad-blockers...) but this year at CES there is a large floor showcase of the Linux Foundation's Automotive Grade Linux...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...Linux-CES-2020

  • #2
    Sadly a focus on web apps! It is really hard to believe in a system that highlights web apps on the sites front page.

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    • #3
      Somebody please support Michael so that he can take a break and attend the next CES :<

      I mean, Michael, you need proper sleep for once...

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      • #4
        Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
        Somebody please support Michael so that he can take a break and attend the next CES :<

        I mean, Michael, you need proper sleep for once...
        I agree.

        Having attended CES many times as both an attendee and as an employee of a company displaying goods at that "show", I certainly agree that it will put you to sleep.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7DG97dAVZns

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        • #5
          Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
          Somebody please support Michael so that he can take a break and attend the next CES :<

          I mean, Michael, you need proper sleep for once...
          If I had the money I’d buy him one of those new AMD based laptops being shown off. I trust Micheal to test them properly!! Frankly some of the specs are almost too good to be true. Especially interesting is the data for improvements to the GPU.

          This might lead to even less sleep for Micheal. though. I still believe he needs to simply take a day off each week. Having a new born is likely a huge drain too, all the more reason to walk away from the systems once a week.

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          • #6
            How is Automotive Grade Linux different from something like https://rusefi.com/ ? If it is different, then its fluffy not-needed crap that should not be in a car to begin with.

            Although initially focused on infotainment, AGL is the only organization planning to address all software in the vehicle: infotainment, instrument cluster, heads-up-display (HUD), telematics/ connected car, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), functional safety and autonomous driving.
            Right, fluffy crap that does not belong in a car to begin with, and completely skips the most important thing that makes a fuel injection engine function. When will car companies learn?

            Having been a machinist a lot of years now, I have a bit of desire of starting my own car company, and its only getting worse as time moves on.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by tiwake View Post
              fluffy not-needed crap that should not be in a car to begin with.
              Most people don;t realize just how much software is in their car. Even the lowest-tech simplest car has millions of lines of code running stuff. The days of you and your dad stripping down that old Chevy in the garage and rebuilding the carb to make it roar (or whatever boomer/Springsteen fantasy that was) are long gone.

              I work in the embedded software industry on a product that meets full ISO functional safety requirements (ISO-26262, IEC 61508, etc), and is involved in every aspect of automitive from the brakes (not fluff) to the cockpit infotainment system (pure fluff). I have also worked in the Linux industry. I can say with confidence I would not trust the linux kernel running under the hood of my car, and I'm skeptical of it running in the cockpit. I think the fundamental monolithic kernel design is just wrong for creating dependable software in hazard-facing situations. Avoid AGL.

              I've taken enough airline flights where the in-flight entertainment systems (running Red Hat Linux, as can be seen during the frequent reboot screens) doesn't work. Imagine if the same plane was using the same software to run its fly-by-wire control systems or its engine fuel delivery? Fiery death from a height.

              There's a reason I live in a low-tech log cabin in the woods. I've seen too much about how the sausage gets made.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by bregma View Post

                Most people don't realize just how much software is in their car. Even the lowest-tech simplest car has millions of lines of code running stuff. The days of you and your dad stripping down that old Chevy in the garage and rebuilding the carb to make it roar (or whatever boomer/Springsteen fantasy that was) are long gone.

                I work in the embedded software industry on a product that meets full ISO functional safety requirements (ISO-26262, IEC 61508, etc), and is involved in every aspect of automitive from the brakes (not fluff) to the cockpit infotainment system (pure fluff). I have also worked in the Linux industry. I can say with confidence I would not trust the linux kernel running under the hood of my car, and I'm skeptical of it running in the cockpit. I think the fundamental monolithic kernel design is just wrong for creating dependable software in hazard-facing situations. Avoid AGL.

                I've taken enough airline flights where the in-flight entertainment systems (running Red Hat Linux, as can be seen during the frequent reboot screens) doesn't work. Imagine if the same plane was using the same software to run its fly-by-wire control systems or its engine fuel delivery? Fiery death from a height.

                There's a reason I live in a low-tech log cabin in the woods. I've seen too much about how the sausage gets made.
                I would not trust custom software... the airliner thing sounds like custom software on top of redhat... which is reminding a set of my braincells of this guy a while back that "hacked" into said system and controlled the plane from his laptop.

                It is still possible (and not difficult) to get modern engines, at least with Ford or Chevy, running on carbs with no software running such things. Not quite as efficient, but it works.

                Having been a machinist for a lot of years, I have worked with quite a few different "inbedded controllers". Some of them sit on top of DOS, some of them sit on top of Windows, some of them sit on top of linux, and some of them are custom built from nothing for its job. By far the crappiest ones are the ones that use windows. Most of the big-name (from scratch) controllers are stable, but annoying to use. LinuxCNC though, I've never heard of it doing anything incorrect once it was set up properly, and is much more flexible to use than anything else.

                I'm just saying that, with the success of linuxCNC, it seems that similar could be achieved with a car ECU, like what https://rusefi.com/ is doing, or is trying to do.
                Last edited by tiwake; 01-09-2020, 10:56 PM. Reason: grammar

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by tiwake View Post
                  I'm just saying that, with the success of linuxCNC, it seems that similar could be achieved with a car ECU
                  If a device driver on a CNC machine has a bug and causes the kernel to crash, what happens?

                  If a device driver in your car steering system causes the kernel to crash at highway speed, what happens?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by tiwake View Post

                    I would not trust custom software... the airliner thing sounds like custom software on top of redhat... which is reminding a set of my braincells of this guy a while back that "hacked" into said system and controlled the plane from his laptop.
                    I'm not aware of any such thing happened.

                    Someone hacked a car (Fiat Chrysler) by getting into the infotainment system, but that's a different kind of thing. The onboard infotainment of the aircraft is on a completely independent circuit, unlike most car infotainment systems that are on CAN bus so can communicate with everything in the car.

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