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  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by linuxgeex View Post
    It's not new...
    That's not what I meant. If I write people slacking ON THE JOB I mean it. Not "idle wait" in low times or whatever. Getting paid on the hour for not doing shit, "stealing the pay", or whatever.

    They didn't have endless sources of entertainment in their pockets. Or at least, not that they'd pull out in front of their co-workers lol.
    Since you are probably too young to know "how it was done" back in the day, I'll tell you that a lot of workers found a secluded place to sleep when at work, as they were staying awake at night doing their own stuff at home or whatever. For some types of physical jobs this is still a thing.

    In bigger offices there were also "rotation absentees" where a whole group of people would take turns in covering the others that never came at work that day by "punching out" (operating the machine that registers when someone came in the office and when left the office) for them, shuffling the stuff on the desk every now and then, placing jackets and umbrellas, and of course lying to everyone that might ask where are the guys missing from the office.

    Also books and cards and stupid games with collegues (why slack alone when you can slack with friends) were also a thing back then, slaking was much more social than it is now where everyone slacks alone with their phone.

    Contrast that with today where I walk into a Starbucks and there's 6 people doing the work that was accomplished reliably by 4 people 5 years ago.
    This is a management problem, and you are a moron if you blame this on some generational issue.

    If you don't keep someone there that enforces the rules, your wage slaves won't work. This isn't a new thing. People born 50 years ago weren't more interested in doing pointless soul-sucking bullshit jobs than they are now.

    This is also valid for Mc Donalds, retail stores and other big corporate employers where you are just a number, if you have a good manager on site, everyone works, if the manager on site sucks, everyone slacks.

    This is for example one of the reasons Mc Donalds here have started replacing cashiers with bigass touchscreens, and left only 1 actual human to just collect the money. Boom, cut 3 workers and replace them with a tireless machine.

    For small companies it is different as you can't just disappear and let others do your work if you are the only one that can do it.

    And for those of you who aren't new to the work force, 5 years ago "stress leave"
    I don't even know what that is (different country). Here the issue is complacent doctors. Complacent doctors everywhere. The guy called in sick for flu or some basic stuff, the doctor certified it (no real problem for them) and boom, not coming to work for a week but you still pay this guy as he is in "medical leave", fuck you very much.
    Again, this will go unnoticed in large corporations with crappy management, you can't pull this off on smaller companies for the same reasons as above (if you are crucial they are going to miss you)
    Last edited by starshipeleven; 12-28-2019, 08:31 PM.

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  • linuxgeex
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    Oh my sweet summer child... If only people slacking on the job and calling sick to not work (when they can) was a new thing.
    It's not new... 25 years ago I managed a friend's family-owned business while he was on vacation for 6 months to Southeast Asia and absenteeism wasn't non-existent. Slacking off however, was non-existent, because the job was piecework, ie the employees were paid the same regardless of how long they took to finish their tasks. So they hustled. Some more than others, but still none of them were below 50% of the productivity of the most productive ones. Why? Because slacking off wasn't rewarded in any way shape or form. They didn't have endless sources of entertainment in their pockets. Or at least, not that they'd pull out in front of their co-workers lol.

    20 years ago I managed a corporate-owned franchise where the staff had busy times and lulls. Did they sometimes do a crossword during the lulls? Yes. Did I mind? No.

    Contrast that with today where I walk into a Starbucks and there's 6 people doing the work that was accomplished reliably by 4 people 5 years ago. They're playing with their phones while there's a lineup. They're screwing orders up left and right and taking "stress leave" because someone had the nerve to ask them to make it right this time please. They're arguing with customers who have told them they're done something wrong. Starbucks can no longer offer free drinks as compensation for the delay because it would bankrupt them. As a result, Starbucks is no longer a premium product, and they need to have a sign on the counter saying, "We will make it right" - with "eventually" implied. McDonalds is actually more reliable than Starbucks because they're hiring Gen-Z!

    And for those of you who aren't new to the work force, 5 years ago "stress leave" was for people who were physically assaulted at work, lost a family member, or were working 80 hour weeks to support their family at two jobs and had temporarily collapsed, but were highly apologetic and had every intention of returning as loyal, productive, long-term employees in a day or two. It was not for people who flipped out because they got simple corrective feedback, or because their pet threw up this morning, or because they chose to party Sunday night with their rent money and now can't understand how they are going to survive, or because someone posted something unflattering on their social media and they're in a panicked flurry of damage control.
    Last edited by linuxgeex; 12-28-2019, 05:36 PM.

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  • hiryu
    replied
    Originally posted by deppman View Post

    The processor is the stepping 10 i7-9750h ("GenuineIntel Family 6 Model 158 Stepping 10"). We have not asked when the stepping 13 model may be available. Almost certainly in next generation hardware.
    According to this, a stepping13 9750h technically may exist: https://www.intel.com/content/www/us...-hardware.html

    Although it seems no one has ever encountered one in the wild. Sounds like the 9980HK are all stepping 13's, but that's probably a bit too much for this particular laptop chassis.

    Leave a comment:


  • deppman
    replied
    Originally posted by hiryu View Post

    I see... Will a stepping 13 CPU be available as an option? Or are we still stuck with stepping 10 9750h CPU's?

    But thanks for the response!
    The processor is the stepping 10 i7-9750h ("GenuineIntel Family 6 Model 158 Stepping 10"). We have not asked when the stepping 13 model may be available. Almost certainly in next generation hardware.

    We did Geekbench runs with and without mtigations and found little change in performance. The Focus configuration did quite a bit better than the average i7-9750h and better than the most recent MBP results (which scores a bit better than average).

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  • hiryu
    replied
    Originally posted by deppman View Post

    Upgrading is fine. These are minimum specs.
    I see... Will a stepping 13 CPU be available as an option? Or are we still stuck with stepping 10 9750h CPU's?

    But thanks for the response!

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  • deppman
    replied
    Originally posted by hiryu View Post
    Looking at the picture... This looks like the latest Oryx Pro from Sys76 (which isn't really a surprise since they're both Clevo based)... I have essentially the latest Oryx Pro model myself, but I got mine just before the 9750h became available so I'm stuck with the 8750h. Neither of these CPU's have the latest speculative execution fixes though. The 9750h comes in 2 variants... One without and one with.. But no one has seen a version of the 9750h with the fixes (the stepping 13 version) in all my searches.

    Anyway, the only visual difference I see is the keyboard. The WASD keys aren't highlighted on mine.

    Are these specs set in stone or can they be configured? Ie, can it be upgraded to an RTX 2080 with 64g of ram?

    It's also worth noting that this is going to be the Max Q version of the GPU due to the thinness of the laptop. Performance is still pretty decent though with my RTX 2080 Max Q IMO.

    Upgrading is fine. These are minimum specs.

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  • phcaorel
    replied
    Originally posted by phcaorel View Post
    Lots of laptops are going to release at CES 2020. Mostly the Ryzen laptops will hit the market.
    ASUS TUF also runs the kubuntu very well. I tried it on my AMD Ryzen model and it works great.

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  • phcaorel
    replied
    Lots of laptops are going to release at CES 2020. Mostly the Ryzen laptops will hit the market.

    Leave a comment:


  • hiryu
    replied
    Looking at the picture... This looks like the latest Oryx Pro from Sys76 (which isn't really a surprise since they're both Clevo based)... I have essentially the latest Oryx Pro model myself, but I got mine just before the 9750h became available so I'm stuck with the 8750h. Neither of these CPU's have the latest speculative execution fixes though. The 9750h comes in 2 variants... One without and one with.. But no one has seen a version of the 9750h with the fixes (the stepping 13 version) in all my searches.

    Anyway, the only visual difference I see is the keyboard. The WASD keys aren't highlighted on mine.

    Are these specs set in stone or can they be configured? Ie, can it be upgraded to an RTX 2080 with 64g of ram?

    It's also worth noting that this is going to be the Max Q version of the GPU due to the thinness of the laptop. Performance is still pretty decent though with my RTX 2080 Max Q IMO.


    Leave a comment:


  • deppman
    replied
    Originally posted by Citan View Post
    Hi!

    Thank you very much to take the time explaining the thoughts behind architectural choices.
    There are some things I wouldn't have suspected at all, but it does allow me to understand better some choices (notably the Nvidia one, as much as it pains me personnally).

    One thing you didn't explain though unless I missed it: why Intel? It's obvious that AMD is much better now in performances. Were you afraid a "regular" processor would consume too much energy and/or that the low-power offering was still not performant enough?

    Because I was really expecting a Ryzen 8-cores at least here...
    Great question. We'd love to offer a Ryzen system, however, available laptop configuration are thin on the ground right now. It's premature to have that as a differentiating factor. At present, our Focus is tightly tuned Hardware + Software combination that reliable, beautiful, and self-explanatory. We will be offering some interesting support features we don't believe have been seen before.


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