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Dell Now Offering More Ubuntu Developer Edition Options For Their Comet Lake XPS

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  • #21
    Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

    DeX has been discontinued.
    unsurprisingly

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    • #22
      Originally posted by microcode View Post
      Why has laptop memory capacity not increased for the past four years? 16GiB is not enough for me to do my job with any kind of efficiency. They complain of power use, but it can't be that crazy.
      More like 8 years. The 12inch Thinkpad X220 came out in 2011 and was upgradable to 16GB.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by ssam View Post

        More like 8 years. The 12inch Thinkpad X220 came out in 2011 and was upgradable to 16GB.
        Not long ago entry level Macbooks still had 4 GB of RAM. 16 GB is actually plenty for power users, too. Of course depending on the definition of power users and use cases.

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        • #24
          Not even one AMD-based option. Same as for Lenovo or System76.

          It's good that they extend their Linux offer but they don't take it seriously yet by offering choice. I'm out.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by microcode View Post
            Why has laptop memory capacity not increased for the past four years? 16GiB is not enough for me to do my job with any kind of efficiency.
            because you didn't buy new laptop? my laptop has 32g

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            • #26
              Originally posted by bavay View Post
              Moreover, if the things I develop target the newest of the newest, most of my users (including myself when I use my own stuff) will get in trouble because their systems are not enough up-to-date.
              do you realize that using same argumentation nobody is going to use software you've developed until it is several years old? pretty stupid arguments from developer
              Originally posted by bavay View Post
              So either we target relatively "old" systems, so our stuff works everywhere or people just walk away and use something else (or nothing at all).
              it doesn't work that way. old systems are old not because they were born old ago, they are old because they don't have new software. including your freshly developed software. if system receives new software, it is new system. it is very arrogant to think that your software is so special that it deserves to be installed quicker than all other software.
              btw, thanks to recent development, now all what is needed from system is non-prehistoric kernel, supporting containerization, all your software can be shipped in container

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              • #27
                pal666 :
                pretty stupid arguments from developer
                Except that this is not a theoretical argument, this is real life experience. What I develop is both used by individual users on their personal computers, on high performance computers (HPC) as well as on servers where it is used for operational applications (ie running 24x7 with an on duty team to guarantee that it never stops). The individual users have very often limited IT skills meaning that lots of them are not even able to up update their systems. Any extra requirements I put on them means they'll stick to older versions instead of updating to the latest version I want them to use. The HPC solutions have skilled maintenance teams but this is not the kind of system where you constantly update the software (on some of these systems, the national weather services run their forecasts so you don't just update the system or the compilers whenever you want). And for the operational applications, you have a whole environment to take into account. Migrating takes time and is risky (something might break and the cost of something not working anymore is high and comes with lots of stress) so you don't update too often (some systems have been running for 8 years without any major upgrade, only the security updates. And some have been migrated after months of work). Therefore, if I want my users to update my software regularly enough, I must support quite old compilers alongside the latest ones or old OS versions (I still had to deal with a WinXP without service packs around two years ago) as well as the latest ones. After a while my users notice that updating my software goes very smoothly and has very low risk, so they accept to update it much more often. So this is not arrogance, it is just real life. Ignoring the realities of the users IS arrogance. And for the containerization, it could be a solution but only to a certain extend: the platform might impose the compiler that has to be used and I've never seen containers being used on the HPC systems that I had to deal with.

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                • #28
                  I'm a developer and don't identify with your use-cases..

                  Originally posted by lucrus View Post
                  • a big display? (average of 42 open windows while developing)
                  I have dual-monitors on my desk for that. I want small and portable when I'm on the go.

                  Originally posted by lucrus View Post
                  • a big touchpad that gets in your way and steals space from the keyboard.
                  The Dell touchpad is crap, but Macbooks have lovely huge ones that do not get in the way.

                  Originally posted by lucrus View Post
                  • max 16GB of RAM
                  I have no real issue with RAM. 16GB is enough for me to build my high-scale TDD backend services.

                  Originally posted by lucrus View Post
                  • Ubuntu 18.04. Please. Any developer out there will replace that. IF a developer needs ANYTHING AT ALL operating system wise, that's a valid Windows license and a penguin on the box, just to be sure the laptop can run linux. The words "Ubuntu" and "Developer" usually do not play well together. The words "Outdated" and "Developer" are not even both included in the same vocabulary of any language.
                  I absolutely do *not* run cutting edge. I want my OS to get out of the way and just work so that I can focus on what I'm building, not give me hassle with my wi-fi drivers.

                  Originally posted by lucrus View Post
                  • Integrated (e.g. non-swappable) battery to save space and weight. Because you know, devs are very light in battery drain, they just browse the net... just in case any of them happen to use IDEs, compilers, emulators and the like, they can always resort to handy external powerbanks. They only had to sell a kidney to buy that ultrabook after all.
                  Portability is a huge benefit to me since I carry my laptop home from work with me every day. I have no issue with battery-life, although my employer does need to replace my laptop every 4-years. Not my kidney being sold though.

                  Originally posted by lucrus View Post
                  • All those choices might be good for a certain category of users, but not for developers.
                  Taking your own personal, anecdotal use-cases and generalizing to all other developers. Good work.

                  I'll trust Dell's sales data more since it actually seems to match what I want anyway.

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

                    Yeah, fuck Cloud.

                    Sephiroth FTW.
                    What? No way. Both are way too overrated. Reno FTW.

                    (But actually I'm more of a Seifer fanboy. Damnit SquareEnix, give us a proper remake of FF8, not a sloppy 'Remaster'!)

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