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Purism Announces "Librem One" As Their Privacy-Minded Software Suite

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  • #11
    As ambitious as this is... if it ends up working and giving them a source of recurring revenue, all the better.

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    • #12
      Librem Chat is based on the Matrix protocol, Librem Social is using Mastodon, and their Librem Tunnel is using Liberty.
      Librem Tunnel is using OpenVPN. Liberty-CLI is used to configure the client.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by edwaleni View Post
        Sounds like they are simply picking up where Blackberry failed.
        If Blackberry was able to apply what they accomplished on BBos onto Android, they would still be around.
        Librem seems to picking up on a niche.
        BlackBerry commited the mistake of creating the best OS til date.. BB10( Based in the marvelous QNX Neutrino .. ).
        Til date no other OS can compete with BB10..

        But for that, and to create a state-of-the-art Hub, BB invested years, and years on it... when it come to market, Androids and IOs were already with lots of applications around them..
        BB had almost none..

        So bottom line..
        People prefer junk OSes, to the most beautiful OS implemented till date..

        Also BB committed a second grave mistake,
        Instead of continuing to Launching good devices BB10 based...they finished their user-base( only launching devices sh*ty Android based.. )
        So they ended without user-base, has expected by such move..

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        • #14
          Originally posted by tuxd3v View Post
          So bottom line..
          People prefer junk OSes, to the most beautiful OS implemented till date..
          It's not really a surprise. "Will I know how to run my existing software on it?" is the number-one determining factor of whether a platform will succeed.

          Windows 3.x won over other graphical environments because it was compatible with people's existing DOS applications. Windows 9x bent over backwards to support people's existing DOS and Windows 3.x applications. Windows XP was the first NT-based Windows marketed to home users because it was the first one Microsoft felt had sufficient backwards compatibility with Windows 3.x and 9x applications. etc. etc. etc. (Ever wonder why doing floppy disk access in Windows 95 caused the system to slow to a crawl? It's because it goes through slow BIOS routines to ensure that any backup TSRs for DOS which are hooking the floppy interrupts will continue to work.)

          This principle is well-enough known that IBM originally tried to license CP/M (the DOS of the business ecosystem in the 8-bit microprocessor era) and DOS internals like the Program Segment Prefix were designed to make it easy for applications to be ported from CP/M. (I remember hearing that there was a lawsuit over that.)

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          • #15
            Originally posted by ssokolow View Post

            It's not really a surprise. "Will I know how to run my existing software on it?" is the number-one determining factor of whether a platform will succeed.

            Windows 3.x won over other graphical environments because it was compatible with people's existing DOS applications. Windows 9x bent over backwards to support people's existing DOS and Windows 3.x applications. Windows XP was the first NT-based Windows marketed to home users because it was the first one Microsoft felt had sufficient backwards compatibility with Windows 3.x and 9x applications. etc. etc. etc. (Ever wonder why doing floppy disk access in Windows 95 caused the system to slow to a crawl? It's because it goes through slow BIOS routines to ensure that any backup TSRs for DOS which are hooking the floppy interrupts will continue to work.)

            This principle is well-enough known that IBM originally tried to license CP/M (the DOS of the business ecosystem in the 8-bit microprocessor era) and DOS internals like the Program Segment Prefix were designed to make it easy for applications to be ported from CP/M. (I remember hearing that there was a lawsuit over that.)
            Your comment make sense in the way BB drop compatibly from BB7( Java based, but slow, at same time full of features, amazing ones.. ),
            To BB10, a new platform, a state-of-the-art-os, but new..

            They took 2 years, only to design the marvellous HUB, of BB10.
            And it his marvellous indeed..
            It his beautiful, practical,fast, long battery life, and plenty of features..

            The problem was that this change could be done in parallel with BB7 devices..in the moment Apple/Google arrival with their OS..
            Instead BB ported around 1000 features per year, but Started too late doing so..

            If they have done it in time, today the market would be different..
            And we could get real smart devices..not like what we have today, the devices that sells today seems prototypes..unfinished devices..

            BB10 used in version 10.2,
            If I recall it correctly, 400MB of RAM, with 400-600 for cache for the marvellous Hub.. it was amazingly fast, with a processor from 2011..
            You could have dozens of apps open and it would be consuming around 1.4GB of RAM, including browsers, and all that stuff..

            Amazing but dead..because people choose a phone by the number of CPU cores it has, and by amount of RAM..
            They lack the Option about the quality of the OS that is running their..


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            • #16
              Originally posted by ssokolow View Post

              It's not really a surprise. "Will I know how to run my existing software on it?" is the number-one determining factor of whether a platform will succeed.
              In that case, webOS wouldn't have failed as it was able to run PalmOS (its predecessor) apps for a long, long time. Same goes for Microsoft's W10M. So no, not the #1 determining factor.
              Last edited by Vistaus; 01 May 2019, 12:24 PM.

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              • #17
                one thing to note is that due to their version of mastodon not accepting complaints from other instances librem.one is being added to block lists so you wont be able to talk to other instances.

                https://source.puri.sm/liberty/smilo...3a901e279c78fc

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

                  In that case, webOS wouldn't have failed as it was able to run PalmOS (its predecessor) apps for a long, long time. Same goes for Microsoft's W10M. So no, not the #1 determining factor.
                  I never said it was the only factor, I said it was the primary factor. That said, I'll admit that I was thinking primarily in terms of established ecosystems.

                  The #1 and #2 spots do swap when an ecosystem is just getting started, with the #2 spot for an established ecosystem being selection of new options available for purchase/download. (Hence exclusives being so critical with consoles, where compatibility with previous generations has been a bonus rather than an expectation.)

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by ssokolow View Post

                    I never said it was the only factor, I said it was the primary factor. That said, I'll admit that I was thinking primarily in terms of established ecosystems.

                    The #1 and #2 spots do swap when an ecosystem is just getting started, with the #2 spot for an established ecosystem being selection of new options available for purchase/download. (Hence exclusives being so critical with consoles, where compatibility with previous generations has been a bonus rather than an expectation.)
                    Yeah, both of which reasons is why Maemo/MeeGo never really took hold. And while BB10 is beautiful, it took a lot of hints from Maemo as well. I still haven't ran into anything as nice as either of these. I'm hoping Librem pulls off the unified messaging like these platforms did. Been tempted to get one of the Sony phones just so I can put SailfishOS on one. Though I have an Xperia, it's not supported (yet).

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