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Java Performance: Ubuntu Linux vs. Windows Vista

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  • phoronix
    started a topic Java Performance: Ubuntu Linux vs. Windows Vista

    Java Performance: Ubuntu Linux vs. Windows Vista

    Phoronix: Java Performance: Ubuntu Linux vs. Windows Vista

    Have you ever wondered on what operating system Java works the best? While by no means is it a conclusive multi-platform comparison, for this article we ran a number of Java benchmarks on both Windows Vista Premium and Ubuntu Linux to see how the Java Virtual Machine performance differs. In addition, when running Ubuntu we had tested Sun's official Java package as well as the OpenJDK alternative.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=13282

  • kraftman
    replied
    Oh my, it's two years old article...

    Leave a comment:


  • kraftman
    replied
    Originally posted by RealNC View Post
    Linux got owned where it matters the most: Graphics.
    I don't agree. It was owned in this test not as much as someone would suppose (according to graphic drivers state on Linux), but I consider non graphic related benchmarks (where Linux simply owned Windows) are far more important. Java graphic performance doesn't affect so many things then non graphic java performance.

    Leave a comment:


  • lasner12
    replied
    A number big players have come up with pages or applications in an attempt to draw World Cup fans into either combining using a laptop whilst watching the live games on television or using the application as their main view into the World Cup. The problem is that nobody has got it quite right. With a live event the data that you see in your World Cup web application needs to be correct with up to the second information or it loses its value. None of the big players have managed this. The data also needs to be relevant and of good quality. The Twitter application fails in this respect.

    Leave a comment:


  • akpch
    replied
    Originally posted by fxfuji View Post
    Interesting results, though it's not clear to me whether the Java performance in Linux is better because the Linux Java engine is better, or because system resource overhead to run Ubuntu is different (lower maybe?) than that to run Windows (another form of the OS 'tax').

    I'm assuming that there are no major resource-draining processes running in the background, but it would be nice to see the results of running the Java benchmarks inside VMs for comparison to the native OS results; that is, in addition to the current methodology, run the tests inside an Ubuntu VM running inside the Windows OS and/or a Windows VM running inside the Ubuntu OS. In fact, it might be possible to run a native and a VM Java benchmark AT THE SAME TIME, which would resolve my questions about whether system overhead is an important factor influencing the results.
    Figured strange results eventually. I was using sin and cos functions in my benchmark which are traced down to native routines. Once switched to something more neutral (xml parsing, string processing) results are very close. And of course in file operations with multiple small files and ext4 Linux is way ahead.

    Leave a comment:


  • fxfuji
    replied
    Interesting results, though it's not clear to me whether the Java performance in Linux is better because the Linux Java engine is better, or because system resource overhead to run Ubuntu is different (lower maybe?) than that to run Windows (another form of the OS 'tax').

    I'm assuming that there are no major resource-draining processes running in the background, but it would be nice to see the results of running the Java benchmarks inside VMs for comparison to the native OS results; that is, in addition to the current methodology, run the tests inside an Ubuntu VM running inside the Windows OS and/or a Windows VM running inside the Ubuntu OS. In fact, it might be possible to run a native and a VM Java benchmark AT THE SAME TIME, which would resolve my questions about whether system overhead is an important factor influencing the results.

    Leave a comment:


  • kraftman
    replied
    Originally posted by akpch View Post
    No, if I want to comapre OSes, not JREs I will pick whatewer RUNS FASTER on the SPECIFIC PLATFORM.

    I admit, should have tried JRockit as well.
    So, you should pick WHATEVER on EACH platform to know what runs faster on specific platform.

    Leave a comment:


  • akpch
    replied
    Originally posted by kraftman View Post
    If you want to compare OS'es not different versions of java use the SAME java on each OS...
    No, if I want to comapre OSes, not JREs I will pick whatewer RUNS FASTER on the SPECIFIC PLATFORM.

    I admit, should have tried JRockit as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • kraftman
    replied
    Originally posted by akpch View Post
    I did some testing on my own. Having run tests with -server switch on windows shows great improvement. The test was multithreaded heavy math calculations.

    Linux was latest kernel from Ubuntu 9.04 (tried both server and desktop flavor) and best result on Vista using SUN Java 6_13 was 15% better than best result on Linux using Open JVM.

    Solaris on the other hand was about 25% faster using 64 bit java 1.5

    Regards
    Alex
    If you want to compare OS'es not different versions of java use the SAME java on each OS...

    Leave a comment:


  • akpch
    replied
    I did some testing on my own. Having run tests with -server switch on windows shows great improvement. The test was multithreaded heavy math calculations.

    Linux was latest kernel from Ubuntu 9.04 (tried both server and desktop flavor) and best result on Vista using SUN Java 6_13 was 15% better than best result on Linux using Open JVM.

    Solaris on the other hand was about 25% faster using 64 bit java 1.5

    Regards
    Alex

    Leave a comment:

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