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Purism Planning For Three Hardware Kill Switches With The Librem 5

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  • Eneni
    replied
    I don’t see the point in the absence of a headphone jack, for example on Iphone 7

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  • tg--
    replied
    Originally posted by Jaxad0127 View Post
    Wifi/Bluetooth is on an M.2 card. You can replace the one it comes with with a newer one later. Same with cellular.
    While this is true for the devboard (which is a devboard, not a phone), I can't possibly see how this could be true for the finished product.
    Adding 2 m.2 sockets and 2 cards would make the device enormously large (it's going to be pretty hefty anyway), and that's just not going to happen.

    I know this has been repeated many times, but purism never commented on it. Most likely because they're not actually that sure how they will actually do it since they haven't even selected a mobile chipset yet.

    Anyway, whatever they do, it won't be replaceable m.2 cards.
    The Redpine WiFi will be a System-on-Module using a direct SDIO connection to the i.MX8, very likely the RS9116 B00 LGA package.
    The Mobile chipset will likely be a Gemalto PLS8 using a direct USB 2.0 connection to the i.MX8; it too is a LGA package.

    No hardware replacement of those components, besides a full replacement board, will be possible.

    This is not based on any information given by Purism, it is an educated guess based on no inside information.
    It is however based on my knowledge on how phones tend to be built by anyone else, and on how Purism laid out the devboard, which gives some insight on what they are actually planning.
    Last edited by tg--; 03-18-2019, 08:30 PM.

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  • Jaxad0127
    replied
    Wifi/Bluetooth is on an M.2 card. You can replace the one it comes with with a newer one later. Same with cellular.

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  • tg--
    replied
    Originally posted by Apokalypz View Post
    caligula, the RAM is probably sufficient for it's particular use case. I guess it does also support an external monitor (according to their marketing), so yea. But my point with the 802.11ac is that it wouldn't cost much (if anything) more to use an 802.11ac chip. That would allow for faster data transfer (for more than just video, but also files and synchronizing.) Also, wave 2 of 802.11 generally includes MU-MIMO which prevents the client from hogging the airtime.
    Cost likely wasn't the issue here.
    I'm fairly certain they just didn't find a WiFi chipset with newer spec support that has the firmware in memory on the chipset itself, instead of being loaded as a blob by the OS driver.
    The reason they need that is, that they strive for FSFs "respects your freedom" certification, which in turn depends on Stallmans old firmware philosophy.
    Firmware that's fixed to the device and not changeable is considered part of the hardware, firmware that's loaded is considered software and has therefore to be free software to be acceptable.

    Personally I don't think that adds any actual value, but I can see their point.
    For Purism that basically means, that the can chose only within a very limited number of actual chipsets, and an 802.11ac one likely just wasn't among those.

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  • haploeco
    replied
    I think these are welcome features. I am more curious about when...

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  • L_A_G
    replied
    Originally posted by Slithery View Post
    How about flashing in a certain pattern that causes an overflow?
    Better safe than sorry
    As I pointed out, they'd probably kill the USB port and and memory card slot too if they were going to a proper "no chances taken"-mode.

    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
    If someone has physical access, USB and memory card kill switches become a moot point since they're not either wireless or are able to be used to gather information. All the rest that the Lockdown mode triggers have been shown to be potential attack vectors, like using proximity and ambient light data to figure out where a person is pressing the screen to figure out what is being typed, get the unlock pattern, etc.
    Seeing how you're not too familiar with the proximity and ambient light sensors; The proximity sensor only turns the screen off so you don't accidentally push something when you put the device to your ear to talk to someone and the ambient light sensor is used to adjust the screen brightness so that the screen is only as bright as it needs to be, hence saving the battery.

    One of them doesn't have any effect on input and the other one is used to turn the touch screen off so you don't accidentally start "ear-dialing" when you try to talk to someone. Hell, turning the ambient light sensor off means that the screen is most probably going to have be at full brightness all the time, making it easier to shoulder surf what's being typed into the device (as the device illuminates this better in the dark) and what's actually on screen.
    Last edited by L_A_G; 03-16-2019, 03:24 PM.

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  • caligula
    replied
    Originally posted by Apokalypz View Post
    caligula, the RAM is probably sufficient for it's particular use case. I guess it does also support an external monitor (according to their marketing), so yea. But my point with the 802.11ac is that it wouldn't cost much (if anything) more to use an 802.11ac chip. That would allow for faster data transfer (for more than just video, but also files and synchronizing.) Also, wave 2 of 802.11 generally includes MU-MIMO which prevents the client from hogging the airtime.
    Free 802.11ac driver status is much worse.

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  • Apokalypz
    replied
    caligula, the RAM is probably sufficient for it's particular use case. I guess it does also support an external monitor (according to their marketing), so yea. But my point with the 802.11ac is that it wouldn't cost much (if anything) more to use an 802.11ac chip. That would allow for faster data transfer (for more than just video, but also files and synchronizing.) Also, wave 2 of 802.11 generally includes MU-MIMO which prevents the client from hogging the airtime.

    Leave a comment:


  • caligula
    replied
    Originally posted by Apokalypz View Post
    The specs are a little lacking for that price tag huh? Keeping in mind that it's a crowd funded project and not massively mass manufactured by the usual hardware giants, it doesn't even have 802.11ac. The specs (which are not subject to change like the visual style is) say 802.11abgn. Throwing in an 802.11ac wave 2 chipset would have been nice and (probably?) only a few dollars more expensive to implement.

    Otherwise, the only other thing I saw lacking was the screen resolution: 720x1440? That's not very high DPI now adays for a 5". What would the cost difference for that be in manufacturing?
    You don't need 802.11ac to stream 720p videos with 5.1 sound. The apps will probably be smaller than Android alternatives. For what it's worth, Samsung already started manufacturing 12GB memory chips for new phones. Maybe you should consider high end Androids if you need 12 or 16 gigs of RAM on a phone and a 4k display.

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  • Apokalypz
    replied
    The specs are a little lacking for that price tag huh? Keeping in mind that it's a crowd funded project and not massively mass manufactured by the usual hardware giants, it doesn't even have 802.11ac. The specs (which are not subject to change like the visual style is) say 802.11abgn. Throwing in an 802.11ac wave 2 chipset would have been nice and (probably?) only a few dollars more expensive to implement.

    Otherwise, the only other thing I saw lacking was the screen resolution: 720x1440? That's not very high DPI now adays for a 5". What would the cost difference for that be in manufacturing?

    Either way, to the topic at hand, having a security oriented phone is needed these days to help balance the market. People buy for convenience and quite a few don't want their personally information and usage habits known. I know quite a few that don't care about the OS, they just care about "being able to do what they want to do."

    Leave a comment:

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