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Google Details Their New Adiantum Encryption For Low-End Android Devices

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  • Google Details Their New Adiantum Encryption For Low-End Android Devices

    Phoronix: Google Details Their New Adiantum Encryption For Low-End Android Devices

    With the upcoming Linux 5.0 kernel release there is initial support for Adiantum and implemented within the fscrypt file-system encryption framework in Google's pursuit to offering more viable data encryption on low-end Android devices...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...tails-Adiantum

  • #2
    Since I always read that people think Speck has been backdoored by the NSA, isn't it possible to check the source code since it's open source? I can immagine it's not that easy to decipher cryptographic code, but since it's in the kernel and a lot of parties are involved, it shouldn't be impossible?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by EarthMind View Post
      [...] but since it's in the kernel and a lot of parties are involved, it shouldn't be impossible?
      It was in the kernel for a short period of time. But it got thrown out in 5.0 (or 4.20 already).

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      • #4
        Apart from that - praise Adiantium, for if it was designed for low-end hardware in mind it should be perfectly suited for my PowerBook G4!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by EarthMind View Post
          isn't it possible to check the source code since it's open source?
          Is already OpenSource https://source.android.com/security/encryption/adiantum

          I'm not mathematical expert here (encryption is a quite complex science), but is likely NSA may know some way to break the encryption.

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          • #6
            At speed of 112 MB/s it sounds like the flash of the low-end phones will be the bottleneck.

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            • #7
              Would this help much with ancient computers and such as well? For example Core 2 Extreme QX9300, still has okay performance as a laptop CPU, but it lacks encryption extensions found in new Intel CPUs.

              On an un-related note, I wonder if it would be possible to create a kernel module that would could software emulate newer instruction sets for older CPU's, which would allow new games and such to run, albeit very slowly, on ancient computers(SSE 4.2, not found on Penryn CPU, but it is on Ivy Bridge, if it could be emulated on Penryn, then modern games could run...)

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              • #8
                Why is the Spectre branch prediction logo being used on this article?
                Last edited by willmore; 02-07-2019, 09:40 PM. Reason: spelling...

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by EarthMind View Post
                  Since I always read that people think Speck has been backdoored by the NSA, isn't it possible to check the source code since it's open source? I can immagine it's not that easy to decipher cryptographic code, but since it's in the kernel and a lot of parties are involved, it shouldn't be impossible?
                  Deciphering cryptography code is inherently complex. Granted that we have more cryptographers today than we had back in the 70s and 80s but as an example we can take DES that the NSA changed slightly in 1976 without a word on why (and DES was open source). It was not until the late 1980s when differential cryptanalysis was discovered that people understood why the NSA changed DES the way they did (their change made DES resistant to this very attack).

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by EarthMind View Post
                    Since I always read that people think Speck has been backdoored by the NSA, isn't it possible to check the source code since it's open source? I can immagine it's not that easy to decipher cryptographic code, but since it's in the kernel and a lot of parties are involved, it shouldn't be impossible?
                    The issue isn't in the code but in the math. https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/1...cal_backdoors/

                    Actually finding backdoors in math, aka the algorithm itself is an entirely different type of fish than finding backdoors in code.

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