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  • Duve
    replied
    Originally posted by unixfan2001 View Post

    Haven't been using SSDs myself for quite some time, but there were screenshots floating around a couple years ago where a window animation (wobbly windows) was breaking on SSDs by creating very noticeable seam between the window and its contents.
    I will be honest, I would just chock that up to X11 being.... X11.

    That said, the conformity was the real issue at large. Frankly, server-side decoration are rather ridged when it comes to design and since wayland was of the business of letting the client's basically do what it want's with it's own window, server-side decoration don't make a whole heap of sense when the client will be ordained by wayland to just do as it pleases. You would have to create some rather big hacks to get clients to conform to server-side decoration and I am not sure that the resulting code would be a good thing in the long run. We are already dealing with a 30+ year history of doing that, wayland wasn't about to repeat that.
    Last edited by Duve; 13 August 2017, 11:15 AM.

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  • unixfan2001
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    Nah, he is wrong, as he is parroting a third party decision without understanding it. That's wrong enough.

    Meh, SSDs may not be cool in a hypotetical situation where everything else is great, but in real life (and Qt) they may make more sense. And I don't see how they break compositing. The compositor itself must support them or the application can't use them of course.

    Anyway the main issue here is that there are programs that want to use either so you have to provide both anyway.
    Haven't been using SSDs myself for quite some time, but there were screenshots floating around a couple years ago where a window animation (wobbly windows) was breaking on SSDs by creating very noticeable seam between the window and its contents.

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  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by unixfan2001 View Post
    To be fair, he's not wrong.
    Nah, he is wrong, as he is parroting a third party decision without understanding it. That's wrong enough.

    Originally posted by unixfan2001 View Post
    SSDs break compositing and make UI design less flexible.
    Meh, SSDs may not be cool in a hypotetical situation where everything else is great, but in real life (and Qt) they may make more sense. And I don't see how they break compositing. The compositor itself must support them or the application can't use them of course.

    Anyway the main issue here is that there are programs that want to use either so you have to provide both anyway.

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  • unixfan2001
    replied
    To be fair, he's not wrong.
    SSDs break compositing and make UI design less flexible.

    The only upside to them is having a more unified design. But you can probably achieve the same with CSDs, a solid default template and a simple API to draw to it.
    Even if that means it's not enforced in quite the same way SSDs are (which does, again, make it more flexible however).

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  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by xen0n View Post
    I think he/she meant "server-side decoration".
    I know. I asked because apparently he can't explain why SSDs are bad, he just repeats endlessly that they are bad because GNOME devs dropped that feature, so they must be bad and old and whatever.

    I've had the same discussions with his former self too, Griffin.

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  • xen0n
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    SSDs are ancient?
    I think he/she meant "server-side decoration".

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  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by GhostOfFunkS View Post
    I wonder how it looks in the ancient SSD world
    SSDs are ancient?

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  • rubdos
    replied
    Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

    GTK3 =! Wayland

    Using GTK3 doesn't automatically mean Wayland is supported, it's just a requirement to use a Wayland-supported toolkit in order to have Wayland support. But there's many more to it, esp. in this case 'cause there's a lot of low-level stuff. So all low-level stuff that would normally request X calls need to request Wayland calls now.
    I assume he'd use libinput too instead of X calls. And if not, it's probably too low level, even for X. But don't quote me on that...

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  • Vistaus
    replied
    Originally posted by rubdos View Post

    Looks like GTK3, so I'd guess so.
    GTK3 =! Wayland

    Using GTK3 doesn't automatically mean Wayland is supported, it's just a requirement to use a Wayland-supported toolkit in order to have Wayland support. But there's many more to it, esp. in this case 'cause there's a lot of low-level stuff. So all low-level stuff that would normally request X calls need to request Wayland calls now.

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  • rubdos
    replied
    Originally posted by gnarlin View Post
    Yes, but will it run on Wayland?
    Looks like GTK3, so I'd guess so.

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