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What Linux Games Are Most Important To You?

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  • Chris
    replied
    Originally posted by Aradreth View Post
    So you'd make people pay twice to play under linux, once for the data files and the windows engine and once for the linux engine?
    The linux binaries would be a fraction of the price of the full game. So instead of paying more than the Windows version, you'd pay for the Windows version, then a little extra. And for people that already have the Windows version, just the little extra.

    The original developers would also not go for it due to piracy as a lot of people would think "Why do I have to buy the game twice?" and pay for the linux engine and pirate the data files.
    Still getting them (the company that ported it, and by extension the original developers who got paid by the company that ported it) more money than if people pirated the whole thing or simply didn't buy it. :P

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  • Aradreth
    replied
    Originally posted by Chris View Post
    I could even imagine getting the rights to port/sell the engine without the associated game data, but which works with said data, would have cheaper license fees associated with it.
    So you'd make people pay twice to play under linux, once for the data files and the windows engine and once for the linux engine? Very few people would go for that. Also a lot of money that you pay up front is because companies don't like people seeing the source code for their engines, so I doubt the price would be much lower. The original developers would also not go for it due to piracy as a lot of people would think "Why do I have to buy the game twice?" and pay for the linux engine and pirate the data files.

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  • Chris
    replied
    To use the analogy that you use later on- you don't see people bitching about the Windows version's price of Halo/Halo2.
    No, they just didn't buy it. So how is the outcome any different?

    if someone like LGP asks publishers to release a linux-client that works with the windows-version of the game, the publishers wont care because they already sold those game-copys.
    Except for those people waiting for a Linux client to buy. No Linux binaries = no sale. Linux binaries = sale. So even if it is just binaries that are sold by the company that did the port, it translates to more sales for the original publishers/developers. Without Linux binaries, they aren't specificly selling to Linux users. With Linux binaries, they are.

    I could even imagine getting the rights to port/sell the engine without the associated game data, but which works with said data, would have cheaper license fees associated with it.

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  • Aradreth
    replied
    Originally posted by Dragonlord View Post
    I thought ID Software did introduce said distinction. After all you bought the game with which you bought a windows client and the right to play the game content ( and use it for modding that is ). Then you can go download the linux client ( limited support which is though okay with me ). So the client and game content had been two separate things. I know others do it differently but ID showed it works so I don't get why it is such a fuzz in the end.
    iD can do this because they own the IP but if a another company wants to port the game they would have to pay for the rights and do the work. So the only way they can earn back the money is by selling the linux version.

    If the port is done in house it's up to each company to decide how they want to do it; companies like Epic and iD charge you once for all supported OSes whereas Introvision and the guys behind Penumbra charge you once per OS (if I remember correctly).

    Think of as each OS being a different console, you buy it once for the specific console not once for all the supported consoles.

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  • Zhick
    replied
    Originally posted by Dragonlord View Post
    I know others do it differently but ID showed it works so I don't get why it is such a fuzz in the end.
    The way I understand it is that the publishers care even less for a linux-client if the client doesn't bring in new sells. For iD it's okay because they've been developing both clients roughly at the same time, but if someone like LGP asks publishers to release a linux-client that works with the windows-version of the game, the publishers wont care because they already sold those game-copys.
    It's actually even a bit worse because afaik LGP sells the games themselves and actually have to pay the original publisher for the rights to port the game, so they _have_ to sell linux-only versions since they wont get any money for the already sold windows-versions.

    Edit: To stay on topic:

    Wine (Warcraft 3, CS1.6) on lans
    War$ow
    And that's it. : /
    I'm propably gonna get X3 since I've always wanted to try out that series, and I'm gonna buy On the Rain-Slick Precipice of Darkness Ep1 as soon as the demo works with xf86-video-ati.
    Last edited by Zhick; 09-07-2008, 11:23 AM.

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  • Dragonlord
    replied
    I thought ID Software did introduce said distinction. After all you bought the game with which you bought a windows client and the right to play the game content ( and use it for modding that is ). Then you can go download the linux client ( limited support which is though okay with me ). So the client and game content had been two separate things. I know others do it differently but ID showed it works so I don't get why it is such a fuzz in the end.

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  • val-gaav
    replied
    Heroes of might and magic 5 Tribes of the East (WINE)
    Glest
    Gltron
    Eisenstern (http://eisenstern.com/) Seems nice and I love RPGs ... unfortunatly it's pre production phase . I do hope it will get finished one day.
    Last edited by val-gaav; 09-07-2008, 08:19 AM.

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  • Svartalf
    replied
    Originally posted by Chris View Post
    But as you say, the biggest cost is in the IP associated with the title. When you buy the Windows version, you buy access to that IP, so buying again for Linux where most of the cost is for something you already have...
    The IP access is a big portion, yes, but if you think I tell everyone that it's the biggest cost, you weren't reading everything I've had to say for some time now.

    Getting Linux binaries for free (if from the original developer) or for a fraction of the price (if from a 3rd party that ported it) seems reasonable in that regard.
    Unfortunately, the system's NOT structured that way. You can reason through it through and through- you bought the Windows version of the game which is DIFFERENT, in the eyes of everyone other than yourself and others that think like you, than the Linux or the MacOS version. To use the analogy that you use later on- you don't see people bitching about the Windows version's price of Halo/Halo2. Either they bought it or they didn't based on what they wanted to do on their PC.

    If all you need to buy is the support for your OS, why should you need to pay (more than) the full price of the entire game?
    You're not buying support for your OS. When you see a game ported to Linux from Windows, it's deemed by all players involved as a different thing than the Windows title- this is because it really IS a different work, at least in part. The ONLY time it will not cost more than the Windows title is when it's simultaneously released either by the Windows studio and publisher or by a separate interest. Moreover, you don't get to move over to the other OS save by the good graces of the studio or publisher in question. You get to do this with iD's stuff because they LET you do that. Ditto Epic. This is more to do with the fact that they did the work themselves than your thinking.

    I imagine this isn't limitted to just Windows-to-Linux, either. How many people do you know that bought the Windows version of Halo 1 or 2 after the XBox version? Despite the PC being far superior for FPS gaming, and despite the popularity of Halo, the games didn't do terribly well. And only a portion of those sales are from people who already had the console version.
    You just answered your own question there...
    Last edited by Svartalf; 09-07-2008, 01:15 AM.

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  • Chris
    replied
    This is part of the reason why I question people wanting the Linux version for free or for cheap when someone other than the original people do the version- that money's got to come from somewhere you know... :-D
    But as you say, the biggest cost is in the IP associated with the title. When you buy the Windows version, you buy access to that IP, so buying again for Linux where most of the cost is for something you already have...

    Getting Linux binaries for free (if from the original developer) or for a fraction of the price (if from a 3rd party that ported it) seems reasonable in that regard. If all you need to buy is the support for your OS, why should you need to pay (more than) the full price of the entire game?

    I imagine this isn't limitted to just Windows-to-Linux, either. How many people do you know that bought the Windows version of Halo 1 or 2 after the XBox version? Despite the PC being far superior for FPS gaming, and despite the popularity of Halo, the games didn't do terribly well. And only a portion of those sales are from people who already had the console version.

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  • Svartalf
    replied
    Originally posted by xav1r View Post
    Well, i just meant, if lets say the linux porting goes thru, and customers start buying, and they have a question on how to install or setup their linux game client on their linux box, would LGP be taking those calls?
    If they did it, YES.

    Unless the original studio/publisher does the work, the ones doing it for the OS in question are the ones that're on the hook for the support. This is part of the reason why I question people wanting the Linux version for free or for cheap when someone other than the original people do the version- that money's got to come from somewhere you know... :-D
    Last edited by Svartalf; 09-06-2008, 07:56 PM. Reason: changed the tone of the remark... :-D

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