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Are The Open-Source Graphics Drivers Good Enough For Steam Linux Gaming?

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  • #41
    Originally posted by ChemicalBrother View Post

    I have more problems running games with Catalyst than with radeonsi, so Catalyst is the actual restriction, not the open-source driver.
    For me it is quite the contrary. Plus, OSS drivers are always compatible with latest kernel and Xorg versions, and have wayland support.

    Insurgency is looking quite good here on Arch with a 6870. ~140fps on average, I would say, in the training mission, with some punctual drops to 40 fps. I might do some testing again with the gallium HUD, if I have time to do so.

    Speaking about this HUD... Isn't it possible to specify a file to output data to ? I though it was possible :/
    If not, I think we should just specify a folder, where to save data in different text files, without rendering anything on screen. This would even have the side effect of lowering the small overhead bring up by the graphs.

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    • #42
      Originally posted by F1esDgSdUTYpm0iy View Post
      Whereas it's obvious you're just trolling, I would like to respond to this remark -- For this particular machine I am using right now, without discrete GPU, Windows is the invalid platform for games. I tried, it won't let me play them properly. Too much overhead from the OS. Switched to Linux and Wine and suddenly, I'm able to play D3, HOTS and other (semi-)modern titles without too much of a hassle. On the OSS drivers no less.

      Intel or AMD? Intel's Windows driver is very poor in particular, especially on the OpenGL side. AMD simply suffers from a weak CPU. OS overhead should be minimal, especially in fullscreen, unless you are loosing performance in driver-land.

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      • #43
        Originally posted by << ⚛ >> View Post

        When VSync is enabled (60 Hz typically), GPU power consumption with the theoretical 420 FPS is lower than with 360 FPS.
        not really if it is faster only because of faster clocks

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        • #44
          If you want to play all new Linux games on launch-day

          that is impossible, there are too many games
          in reality it is the other way around: you can play all your games on mesa
          for example, my son uses windows and plays almost every day for many years. but he almost exclusively plays dota, cs and tf. and(surprise) they all can be nicely played on mesa since like forever

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          • #45
            Originally posted by pal666 View Post
            that is impossible, there are too many games
            in reality it is the other way around: you can play all your games on mesa
            for example, my son uses windows and plays almost every day for many years. but he almost exclusively plays dota, cs and tf. and(surprise) they all can be nicely played on mesa since like forever[/FONT][/COLOR]
            Well, since 2014, to be honest. I would even say Q2 2014. But that doesn't matter anymore, since those games are running fine now

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            • #46
              Originally posted by gamerk2 View Post
              Intel or AMD? Intel's Windows driver is very poor in particular, especially on the OpenGL side. AMD simply suffers from a weak CPU. OS overhead should be minimal, especially in fullscreen, unless you are loosing performance in driver-land.
              AMD. And it's not just the graphics performance that feels weaker in Windows for me; it's the whole thing. Booting is substantially slower, file performance is drastically slower (NTFS' performance really seems to decay quite hard after some time, not entirely sure why, part is fragmentation but I suspect something else is going on there as well) but, CPU performance as well seems to be weaker. Something about Windows' scheduler or something along those lines; my own C# password manager's performance is 50% - 100% better in Linux than in Windows (which is its native platform, given the fact it's C# but, still, it is faster in Linux). I have other such examples as well of software simply performing better in Linux; chess engines for example.

              Last but certainly not least, Linux gave me the ability to cherry pick the kernel and the scaling governor in play. Giving me far more control over things like latency and throughput than I would have in Windows. The Liquorix kernel, for example, seems to play really nice with Wine Staging with CSMT enabled. Some minor tweaks to the exact settings of the ondemand governor and I'm looking at a machine that does not feel like it's lacking punch at all (which it obviously is, AMD does indeed leave their APUs wanting in CPU punch).

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              • #47
                Originally posted by F1esDgSdUTYpm0iy View Post
                AMD. And it's not just the graphics performance that feels weaker in Windows for me; it's the whole thing. Booting is substantially slower, file performance is drastically slower (NTFS' performance really seems to decay quite hard after some time, not entirely sure why, part is fragmentation but I suspect something else is going on there as well) but, CPU performance as well seems to be weaker. Something about Windows' scheduler or something along those lines; my own C# password manager's performance is 50% - 100% better in Linux than in Windows (which is its native platform, given the fact it's C# but, still, it is faster in Linux). I have other such examples as well of software simply performing better in Linux; chess engines for example.

                Last but certainly not least, Linux gave me the ability to cherry pick the kernel and the scaling governor in play. Giving me far more control over things like latency and throughput than I would have in Windows. The Liquorix kernel, for example, seems to play really nice with Wine Staging with CSMT enabled. Some minor tweaks to the exact settings of the ondemand governor and I'm looking at a machine that does not feel like it's lacking punch at all (which it obviously is, AMD does indeed leave their APUs wanting in CPU punch).
                I think that's because linux actually tries to put loads where it would have the least amount of latency, where as windows just gives cpu time and the app has to do what it can with it. Windows is more like time slicing than scheduling.

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                • #48
                  Originally posted by << ⚛ >> View Post
                  The relevant source code is in mesa-11.0.4/src/gallium/auxiliary/hud. It would be possible to add file output there.
                  It's actually really easy to read out, i.e. when I played a bit with it, only so little is required: http://www.phoronix.com/forums/forum...806#post820806
                  But there's a lot missing for a proper solution.
                  I was hoping that this discussion might not only yield input for gallium_hud, but also output of the values: http://lists.freedesktop.org/archive...er/098544.html

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                  • #49
                    Originally posted by F1esDgSdUTYpm0iy View Post
                    Whereas it's obvious you're just trolling, I would like to respond to this remark -- For this particular machine I am using right now, without discrete GPU, Windows is the invalid platform for games. I tried, it won't let me play them properly. Too much overhead from the OS. Switched to Linux and Wine and suddenly, I'm able to play D3, HOTS and other (semi-)modern titles without too much of a hassle. On the OSS drivers no less.
                    While the performance will decrease while doing games like that (most of the time), I had a similar issue where I had to boot into Linux to run a game through WINE because Windows had issues somewhere, worked great on OSS drivers. Couldn't get catalyst drivers to work at the time due to some stupid dependency error forcing it to remove WINE, which is now resolved IIRC.

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                    • #50
                      Originally posted by F1esDgSdUTYpm0iy View Post
                      AMD. And it's not just the graphics performance that feels weaker in Windows for me; it's the whole thing. Booting is substantially slower, file performance is drastically slower (NTFS' performance really seems to decay quite hard after some time, not entirely sure why, part is fragmentation but I suspect something else is going on there as well) but, CPU performance as well seems to be weaker. Something about Windows' scheduler or something along those lines; my own C# password manager's performance is 50% - 100% better in Linux than in Windows (which is its native platform, given the fact it's C# but, still, it is faster in Linux). I have other such examples as well of software simply performing better in Linux; chess engines for example.

                      Last but certainly not least, Linux gave me the ability to cherry pick the kernel and the scaling governor in play. Giving me far more control over things like latency and throughput than I would have in Windows. The Liquorix kernel, for example, seems to play really nice with Wine Staging with CSMT enabled. Some minor tweaks to the exact settings of the ondemand governor and I'm looking at a machine that does not feel like it's lacking punch at all (which it obviously is, AMD does indeed leave their APUs wanting in CPU punch).
                      There might be another exponential algorithm at play in Windows Update.
                      Making your computer slower with each update.

                      Exponential algorithm making Windows XP miserable could be fixed
                      A decade of patches makes svchost.exe a very sad boy indeed.
                      http://arstechnica.com/information-t...ould-be-fixed/

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