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SDL 2.0 Has Been Officially Released

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  • #11
    Originally posted by stqn View Post
    LGPL, if your program is open-source, allows static linking. It even allows it for closed-source programs if you provide the object files to allow users to relink it with a different version of the LGPL lib.

    And as I wrote in the previous news, SDL 1.2 is not under the GPL, but under the LGPL.
    I'm aware of all of that, and wasn't the point. I thought it was implicit that I meant on closed source programs (i.e., most mainstream games), and without any extra requirement on your program, with the obvious exceptions of publishing any changes you did to the library.

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    • #12
      Of course, dynamic linking is superior to static linking as it allows you to update the version.
      It's not exactly a static v.s. dynamic but more a bundled lib v.s. system lib, but it should apply : a nwn install contains a bundled sdl 1.2.5. On a recent system, all it does is fail on startup.
      To launch it on those system, you need to remove it from LD_LIBRARY_PATH so that the nwn executable can link the system version.

      If SDL was statically linked, or even if the lib location was hardcoded, we couldn't even do that.

      With games statically linked to SDL2 created if the coming years, I expect then to be completely lost (i.e. to be impossible to execute) in ten years.

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      • #13
        Still no option to make an sRGB context?
        Is this 2013 or 1997?

        The only cross-platform windowing library supporting sRGB is GLFW...

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        • #14
          Originally posted by peppercats View Post
          Still no option to make an sRGB context?
          Is this 2013 or 1997?

          The only cross-platform windowing library supporting sRGB is GLFW...
          Explain this assuming I am ignorant (which is true). What is sRGB and what does it do?

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          • #15
            Originally posted by dh04000 View Post
            Explain this assuming I am ignorant (which is true). What is sRGB and what does it do?
            aids with gamma correction, an extremely important part in making graphics not look terrible.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by peppercats View Post
              aids with gamma correction, an extremely important part in making graphics not look terrible.
              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamma_correction

              I looked it up. It emulates "exposure" so color and contrast look as intended in the virtual world (ie: dark here but light there)? Did I get that right? How does valve do gamma then if SDL 2.0 can not. They have it figured out it seems.

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              • #17
                Yea, you also have gamma correction on UT2004, which also uses SDL...

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by dh04000 View Post
                  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamma_correction

                  I looked it up. It emulates "exposure" so color and contrast look as intended in the virtual world (ie: dark here but light there)? Did I get that right? How does valve do gamma then if SDL 2.0 can not. They have it figured out it seems.
                  Images are encoded in srgb space (non-linear) by default to make them look right on the screen. When using such textures you will want the color values in linear space else your calculations(also texture sampling/filtering/blending) will be incorrect.

                  I guess Valve will be doing tone mapping in the shader anyway, can live without a srgb framebuffer.

                  Btw afaik this srgb capable flag is to request a srgb capable buffer explicitly, you will get one by default if the gpu supports it.

                  Edit:
                  Did a quick check with HD4850/Catalyst and SDL2. Default framebuffer is reported as srgb capable.
                  Last edited by log0; 08-13-2013, 02:02 PM.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by shmerl View Post
                    No OpenGL 4.x support? It sounds bad. Is it in the short term plans?
                    Actually, it supports any OpenGL version. See Tesseract, it uses SDL 2 and OpenGL 4 functionality (if available).

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by Calinou View Post
                      Actually, it supports any OpenGL version. See Tesseract, it uses SDL 2 and OpenGL 4 functionality (if available).
                      That's good. They just wrote it confusingly as 3.0+.

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